Loose kitchen faucet

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Hi,
We have a Delta kitchen faucet that is very loose.
It looks a lot like this one:
http://media.photobucket.com/user/cozykat/media/house/decor/DSC02162.jpg.ht ml
When I try to swivel the faucet left to right the base is moving along with the faucet. The entire base if very loose.
I looked underneath the sink and was hard to get a look at the underside of the faucet from the cabinet so I took a photo with my iphone. I can see t hat there are some screws that may be loose.
Also the faucet doesn't move back and forth very easily now. It seems like the hose and the hot and cold water feeds are not sitting right and it is not moving freely.
Can a person with very little plumbing skills fix this? It's going to be h ard to get at those screws because there isn't much room to work with under that cabinet. I am reasonably handy and can snake drains and take traps a part and fix broken toilet bowl valves and easy things like that but I've n ever done any big plumbing jobs.
I would appreciate any suggestions on how to fix this and if I should just get a plumber in to do the job.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
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On 11/13/2014 05:12 AM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I'm sure you can fix it yourself. why not post the photo you took with your iphone.
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Steve,
Delta has really good customer service. Installing these kitchen faucets is often an easy DIY job though sometimes space, under the sink, may be limiting. If you need small hands get one of the kids to do it.
If you need immediate assistance, call the Delta Help Line at 1-800-345-DELTA (3358).
The Delta Help Line is available: Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. EST Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. EST
It sounds to me as if you need the manual for your faucet, which is a "Debonair", I think. The manual will have the installation instructions.
Dave M.
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On Thursday, November 13, 2014 6:12:38 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

that there are some screws that may be loose.

s not moving freely.

er that cabinet. I am reasonably handy and can snake drains and take traps apart and fix broken toilet bowl valves and easy things like that but I've never done any big plumbing jobs.

Single hole faucets like that are held on by a large nut on the threaded shaft that goes into the sink. Never seen one held on by screws. If you look underneath and have someone wiggle it, what's going on should be obvious. Just tighten the nut with pliers.
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trader_4 wrote:

Gotta disagree here , trader . Most every single lever faucet I've ever worked on had a pair of studs coming thru the sink holes where the supply lines would be on a 2 handle unit . Often all that is needed is a deep socket to fit the nuts and enough extensions on the ratchet handle to get below the sink bottom . OP may want to loosen them first and work some more plumbers putty under the faucet base , it's probably mostly been worked out by the movement . Not good to have water getting past the base , can cause real problems in the sink cabinet ... and damage to the countertop if it's formica-clad particle board .
--
Snag



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On Thursday, November 13, 2014 8:37:47 AM UTC-8, Terry Coombs wrote:

A "basin wrench" may do it but I don't think they close down enough for small nuts. It should be an item in every DIY tool box.
Harry K
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On Thursday, November 13, 2014 11:37:47 AM UTC-5, Terry Coombs wrote:

I guess it depends on your definition of "single hole". To me, that means a real single hole sink. There are no holes where traditional faucets would be. The whole purpose is for a clean look. What you're talking about are retrofit schemes where it has a wide base plate that covers the no longer used holes. In that case, I guess they do use the old holes to secure it. But you then could not use that faucet in a true one hole sink. I have a one hole sink, there is no base plate, just the faucet coming directly out of the one hole. I'd call the other type a "single hole look".
In any case, what's holding it, what's loose should be obvious by crawling underneath with a flashlight.
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On Sunday, November 16, 2014 8:03:58 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

PS: After posting this, I went back and looked at the pic the OP posted of what he's talking about. That is indeed a one hole faucet, like I have, and there is no baseplate, holes, studs where the traditional faucets would go. It's held on by one big nut.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com;3308054 Wrote: >

Instead of showing us what your faucet looks like, if you could post a picture of the underside of the faucet behind the sink, that would be better.
As was noted earlier, single hole faucets like that normally just have a bolt and nut that tightens up under the counter top to secure the faucet in place.
Generally, one would tighten that nut with a socket wrench with an extension bar on it.
--
nestork


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If installed as in the photo, without the escutcheon plate, the faucet is attached underneath with a single nut that is hand tightened. Then, there are two Phillips locking screws to tighten. Link to the Delta faucet, page 3: http://www.deltafaucet.com/customersupport/documentation/16927-sd-dst.html?document=mi&documentIndex=0#flashWrapper This is a small job if you can get under the sink. Reach up to hand tighten then use a flashlight to find the screws.
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It's not a hard job. Older faucets like mine had tiny nuts holding it on, I replaced it with a much easier large nylon nut. Those little ones always rust.
You need good light. I use a headlamp. And one of those bendy Nite-Eze gumbies.
Little tiny screws and bits of metal will fall out. They will land in your eye. Remain calm. Your natural reaction will be a reflexive jerk that will bash your face into the drain pipe.
Do not allow your children near by. You will say bad words that they will gleefully post on youtube.
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On Friday, November 14, 2014 5:29:35 AM UTC-8, TimR wrote:

<snip> Yes they do. About 2 years ago I turned on (or tried to) the kitchen faucet and the whole thing came right off the sink. All the parts that held it down had rusted away.
Yes, I called a plumber. At my age I am past laying on my back under a sink :).
Harry K
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On 11/14/2014 10:01 AM, Harry K wrote:

I replaced my kitchen faucet a couple of weeks ago. Before tackling the job, I looked online for advice, since everybody has ideas that I haven't thought of. The first suggestion was brilliant: make sure the local hardware store is open when you start the job, since you may have to run to the store for stuff. Good advice for any home DIY task.
It was also (correctly) pointed out that installing the new faucet is the easier part of the job; getting the old faucet out is often much more of a challenge.
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On Monday, November 17, 2014 5:24:06 PM UTC-5, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

May? You gotta be kidding.
The MINIMUM trips for a DIY plumbing job is 3: one to buy the parts you think you need, the next one to buy the parts it turns out you really need, the next one to replace the parts you broke or dropped somewhere you can't get them out of.
There IS NO maximum number of trips.
PS. The pros are laughing, but they shouldn't. They do the same thing, except they've got more parts on their truck and don't have to go to the store.
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On Thursday, November 13, 2014 4:12:38 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

http://www.deltafaucet.com/customersupport/documentation/16927-sssd-dst.html?document=mi&fromDetailArea=kitchen&documentIndex=0#flashWrapper
There's a big nut under the sink that holds the faucet in place. It has to be tightened, but first you have to loosen two lock screws that hold it in place. Retighten them after you tighten the big nut.
I noticed some photos of Moen faucets. They're good unless they leak because repair normally requires removing their cylindrical cartridge, and it often becomes stuck because of mineral build-up. Google "stuck Moen" to see how difficult it can be to remove and how the factory recommendations and usual removal tools are often completely useless. Because of this, I'd choose one of these Moen faucets only where the whole faucet can be replaced fairly easily, like a sink, and definitely not in a shower or bathtub, where the faucet is installed in a wall. However some of the newer Moen designs dispense with the cylindrical cartridge and use a much easier to remove ceramic cartridge.
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On Sunday, November 16, 2014 6:49:27 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

A big nut and then two lock screws to hold the nut. Is this a faucet or the landing gear on a 777?
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On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 1:21:45 PM UTC-7, trader_4 wrote:

I'm guessing Moen did that because the big nut can't be tightened enough by hand, there may not be enough room to turn slip joint pliers in the narrow space between the back of the sink and the kitchen cabinet, and few homeowners have a big flare nut socket or crow's foot socket for the nut. OTOH almost everybody has a screwdriver to tighten a couple of smaller screws.
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 12:57:53 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

I'm having a hard time visualizing this. If the large nut can't be tightened enough, then how are two lock nuts that hold that nut going to secure it? If it's loose and you lock it, it's still loose.
I think the one hole faucets I've seen have been like Nestor says, ie they use a metal part that's cup like, larger than the hole, that goes over the part of the faucet that comes through the sink and then they use a smaller 5/8" or so nut to tighten that up.
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'Terry Coombs[_2_ Wrote: > ;3308223']

>

> supply

I expect every single lever faucet will come with a wide 8" C-C base as an accessory so that it can be retrofitted to counter tops or sinks with existing two handle faucets. Otherwise, people wouldn't buy that single lever faucet because it would leave two wide open gaping holes in their counter top or kitchen sink.
Terry, I expect what you've seen are those accessories for covering those 8" C-C holes, but the faucet can be installed without that base accessory.
--
nestork


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On Sunday, November 16, 2014 2:17:15 PM UTC-5, nestork wrote:

Makes sense. I also should correct something I said. I said the faucet the OP has is held on by a large nut on the faucet where it goes through the one hole. I'm not sure it's actually a large nut that larger than the hole itself. It's been a long time since I put mine in. And now I vaguely recall that maybe there is a piece that goes underneath and then a smaller nut tightens up against it to hold it. That would also be easier to deal with than a large nut.
But in any case, as I said before, if he crawls under with a flashlight and takes a look, it should be obvious what holds it and what needs to be tightened. Also, if the exact faucet can be indentified, there are likely install intructions and/or parts diagrams that show what's going on.
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