Limestone

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Also, I wasn't using Comet with bleach on the limestone -- I was using it on the sink, bathtub, and toilet.
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You learned on the internet not to use bleach on limestone, well I guess I have been doing it wrong on our limestone house and patio since 73, and all the other homes and commercial buildings ive cleaned, gee if only I had checked the internet then. What you know perry is little.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in 3134.bay.webtv.net:

Thank you for your kind and thoughtful response. Pray tell me then, with all of your exhaustive expertise, why a sponge with bleach on it bleached out the limestone when I laid it on the floor of the shower stall to dry? And why only the areas of tile on which I have used a bleach-based cleaner are stained?
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On Sun, 25 Jun 2006 20:25:22 GMT, Perri Morgan

Probably because your limestone was dyed.
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Bleach does nothing more than kill mold , it does not "bleach out" limestone or change its color from when it was cut. You said the sponge "Bleaced out" the area, well all it did was clean and kill mold, nothing more harmfull than that. Stone is porus and remains wet, mold grows where conditions are right, like in your shower. So go get your laundry bleach and pour some on, you have thought this out to death and the answer is simple, Bleach.
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m Ransley wrote:

Once you clean the limestone to the best you are able, then you must seal. The pros use a sealant called POROUS PLUS, and it goes for about $90 for a gallon, which will last you the lifetime of the bath. It is somewhat toxic so be careful. But, my experience is some of the mold works its way into the stone and is never compeltely cleaned. As well, the surface can be harmed, and then you may need a pro to buff it with a refinisher/polisher. Isn't limestone FUN? looks fab when new though.
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about
well,
That's probably what I need to do -- and just get a pro to do the whole thing, including the sealing. I have no idea whether they did it when the house was built or not.

Sure does! I wonder why it's used for bathrooms and kitchen countertops so much, though, given its porous quality? But I was mesmerized by the fossils and stuff in this stone. Still am.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in 3136.bay.webtv.net:

The limestone is sort of a taupe color with some darker veining; the spot where I put the sponge with bleach on it discolored to a white spot in the exact color of the sponge. It was months ago, when I first moved in. So if it wasn't the bleach in the Comet that discolored the tile -- to white, no less -- then it was some other agent in the cleaner.
So I don't put a sponge with Comet on it on the limestone to dry anymore. Problem solved.
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Perri Morgan wrote:

Once you have successfully cleaned an area, the stone then needs a sealer to help it resist further attacks by mold, chemical cleaners, etc.
My understanding is that most stone installers recommend periodic resealing for long life of the beautiful finish. Kitchen counters are a notable example as we gets lots of food, juices, spices, and cleaning agents applied.
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Yes, that has been recommended, but I'm reluctant to apply any more sealer for fear that whatever the cause, I might be sealing it into the stone. But as soon as I come to a resolution, I plan to start sealing more frequently than I did this first year.
Thanks for your response.
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Perri Morgan wrote:

He gave you the answer. The product is called "Photoshop" and is so commonly used that it is both a noun and a verb.
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Oh no. If that's what it is, I'm going to become homicidal. Is there any way to restore it, then?
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On Sun, 25 Jun 2006 17:40:19 GMT, Perri Morgan

You don't have any scrap peices to experiment on, do you? Toothpaste and a stiff brush would probably work.
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As a matter of fact, I do -- lots of them! It hadn't even occurred to me to try different substances that I'm using on the tile scraps.
What a great idea. I can't believe I didn't think of it myself. Thanks!
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My guess is that the stain is potassium permanganate, KMnO4. Use oxalic acid to remove it. Bartenders' Friend and Stainless Steel Cleaner (spray) contain oxalic acid. You can probably buy a few ounces at a pharmacy or chemical supply house.
Perri Morgan wrote:

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Can I try using the stainless steel cleaner that I use for my appliances or do the pharmacy or chemical supply formulas contain a higher concentration?
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 14:34:29 GMT, Perri Morgan

You can *TRY* anything you like. The problem is, you used limestone, and anything that's likely to chemically remove the stain is likely to chemically remove the limestone, faster.
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Goedjn wrote:

When trying anything new, try it on a hidden surface to see how it goes.
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I've got lots of leftover limestone to experiment on.
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Does this look like what you're seeing
http://angier-fox.com/images/04-ynp/image/0411-ynp-00141.jpg
http://angier-fox.com/images/04-ynp/image/page17.html

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