Light bulb lube???

Page 1 of 2  
I've noticed that when changing lightbulbs that the socket seems quite "rough" and the bulbs don't screw in smoothly. I always wonder if the contact is as good as it could be.
Is there something I can apply to the threads of the bulb to "lubricate" them?
Thx!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is a good question!
I would think such a "lubricant" would need to conduct electricity for it to work....
If it DID conduct electricity, and you got too much on - going up to the glass portion, then it would be an electrocution hazard (when replacing the bulb the next time and touching the glass and lube). Or if you put too much on between the ring and bottom contact, it could cause a short circuit.
If it DID NOT conduct electricity, the bulb might not light.
If I were a manufacturer (in these days of lawsuits), there is no way on earth I would ever manufacture such a product and advise consumers to use it on light bulbs.
However there is aluminum wiring anti-oxidant "goop" available in electrical departments. I don't know if this would act as a lubricant or as a glue after it has been on a bulb socket for a year or more? Use very little and at your own risk.
"Noozer" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No... Mineral oil helps avoid fretting corrosion in electrical connectors.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rub them with a soft pencil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-> Rub them with a soft pencil. ->
You mean with the graphite?
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.bulbez.com /
Captain Joe Redcloud
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The tail lights in my car have some kind of grease on them to fight corrosion. I imagine an auto parts place would sell it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is what I was thinking, but I don't think that it would be rated for the heat of a 120volt bulb.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Noozer wrote:

Actually some automobile lamps get hotter than the ones in your home. The stuff is a dielectric grease and it is easy to find at auto parts stores as well as some electrical departments in hardware stores.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good luck with that. Based on a year's worth of intensive lamp shopping for my new house, I've found 95% of lamps now come from China. The bases are just one step better than Reynold's heavy duty aluminum foil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Kanter wrote:

I fear that is why you have to look. I can't see how they could make them cheaper.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most of the better lamps I found were "artisan" products. You know: $400.00 because they came with a hand stenciled shade or some such thing. Doesn't matter, though. I don't find corrosion problems in lamps. Seems to occur more with ceiling fixtures.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Kanter wrote:

Yep, more heat.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug said: Good luck with that. Based on a year's worth of intensive lamp shopping for my new house, I've found 95% of lamps now come from China. The bases are just one step better than Reynold's heavy duty aluminum foil.
============== You should also discover that 95% of the lamp sockets are also made in China and are equally worthless. Center contacts corrode quickly and the cheap pop rivets that carry current get loose and often melt from the heat from the increased resistance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph Meehan wrote:

You can find dielectric grease as labeled for sparkplug boots. Sparkplug boots get really hot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Odd as it may sound, there is a lubricant for light bulb bases. Sign companies are the typical users for signs which have thousands of bulbs that may stay in the sockets for years. The main reason for using a lubricant is to minimize corrosion so that the bulbs can be removed without damaging the socket. Put the words "base lubricant" into the first blank at: http://www.atlantalightbulbs.com/search.html and you should get a hit.
If you don't find something that's specially made for the job, try a silicone-based lubricant. Don't use much and wipe the base of the bulb before putting it into the socket. As I recall, the lubricants are non-conductive since screwing the bulb into the socket will rub a clean metal-to-metal contact. A conductive lubricant (like graphite) could cause a short circuit or set up conditions for an electrical arc. That you don't want since any arcing will make things very hot very fast.
Don't use the usual lubricants like oil. The heat from the bulb can cook the oil into a solid glue.
TKM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In sort, I think you have your answer: don't use lubricant, and don't worry about it. Household light bulbs have been functioning fine witout it. And given all the warnings, hazards, caveats, and pitfalls that have been mentioned here, and since you don't indicate that you have any particular reason to use lubricant (you just seem to think it would be useful, which apparently it is not), then don't do it. It isn't useful in your situation, and could make for big problems, like getting electrocuted.
-Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
kevin wrote:

Your reading of the responses seems a lot different than mine.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm...

Well, it sure seems like the OP does not actually have any problem whatsoever, other than a sort of feeling that maybe the contact could be better. The OP didn't say the bulbs burn out too fast, or get hotter than expected, or flicker, or get stuck in the sockets, or are hard for him to put in, or take out, or hum, or sometimes need wiggling, or make a scratching noise when installed that irritates his sensitive hears, or make keep him up at night worrying. In short, the OP made an observation, and wondered if it meant anything. From reading the responses, the answer seems to be "No, your observation means nothing." To wit:
If you put the wrong stuff on, the that is a hazard...

.... or just make your bulb not work:

Or as another poster puts it, after describing why in lubrication is called for in other harsh or extreme conditions (sign companies with hundreds of bulbs that stay in for years at a time)...

.... the lubricant won't necessarily give you better contact anyway, since it is non conductive. And again...

.... the wrong stuff could be a hazard, or...

.... cause problems later.
Or you could put in something not designed for 120V bulbs...

.... and just presumably take your chances that it won't be some kind of problem, all in order to solve a "corrosion" problem that the OP never indicated he even had (quite rough != corroded).
Or you could search for an expensive product ...

.... to replace something that is working, has probably worked for years for the OP, has no visible signs of trouble, and is commonplace in probably 99% of electrified homes on the planet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
kevin wrote:

Humbug. That is just a summary of your thinking and has nothing to do with the responses provided here. Electrocuted? About as much chance as having your car drive over you while you are driving. Possible but as unlikely as you winning the $340+million lottery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.