Lessons from Sandy

Page 9 of 13  
On 11/7/2012 4:49 AM, harry wrote:

Heck, the government always comes along and bans the good stuff because it harms the endangered Three Toed Barking Sea Snail. I seem to remember an anti-fouling paint that worked very well but was outlawed because it worked too well killing anything that tried to attach itself to steel boat hulls and other underwater steel structures. O_o
TDD
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On Wed, 7 Nov 2012 02:49:24 -0800 (PST), harry

For a man who lives on an island you surly do not know much about salt water.
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On Mon, 5 Nov 2012 23:42:02 -0800 (PST), harry

And get painted regularly.

Most beach property has a rather high water table.
How did you get out of my killfile?
Jim
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On Mon, 5 Nov 2012 23:42:02 -0800 (PST), harry

That is a guy who was never a sailor.
Painting steel ships is an ongoing job and there is always someone chipping and painting something.
The real problem near the beach is salt air. Hot dipped galvanized is just a stop gap measure. You really need stainless or aluminum.
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On 11/6/2012 10:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In the late 80's I was out in The Marshall Islands and I saw some of the Japanese coastal gun emplacements from WWII rusting away. The gun barrels and gears were flaking off layers of rust and crumbling but the only intact pieces of metal were the galvanized sheet metal covers on parts of the guns. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 06 Nov 2012 13:44:12 -0600, The Daring Dufas

This is a 4 year old hot dipped galvanized anchor
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/anchor.jpg
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On 11/6/2012 2:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I saw a lot of corroded metal out in the islands and the galvanized sheet metal that disintegrated was the metal that had its zinc coating damaged or worn off. I've used spray on zinc coatings on parts in cooling towers to add life to them. ^_^
TDD
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On Nov 5, 7:24pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As whole neighbourhoods are demolished, raising the new houses would be no problem The lower floors have only garages and other non-habitable rooms. Boundary walls are substantially constructed and form flood barriers with watertight gates. Removable watertight barriers can be fitted to doorways
Buildlings are of masonry construction and the lower parts of walls and floors are tiled to swimming pool standards. There can be no basements. Electrical wiring is all run from the top down, there are no low level outlets The lower part of staircases is of concrete construction. Fixed furniture is (eg kitchen) of metal. There is high level easily accessible storage for high value items. Skirting/baseboards are plastic fixed with brass screws Arrangements are made to drain floodwater as it recedes.
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Doesn't seem designed to withstand the real force of water. The only way to withstand that is to let it pass, Harry. Build on pilings, high enough, sturdy enough and deep enough to keep the building wayabove the wall of water that can come rushing in. The only thing that kept the Dutch flood of '53 from being way worse is that there were so many old dikes that slowed and held back the sea when the first line of defense was broken. Ther is absolutely nothing like that in the NY metro area.
--
Best regards
Han
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On Mon, 5 Nov 2012 23:37:58 -0800 (PST), harry

stilts and guarantee the footings won't wash out? One single family house going down is not a disaster. An apartment building loosing it's footing is.
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On Tue, 06 Nov 2012 21:28:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

There are hundreds if not thousands of condos, up to 20-30 stories high on pilings on the beach in Florida. The joke around here is the condos will hold the beach in "the big one". Most are 10-12' to the first finished floor and open under that.
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On Nov 7, 2:28am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You use steel/concrete piles that are driven/bored in maybe twenty or thirty feet. Piles have been in use for two thousand years,
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On 11/7/2012 4:52 AM, harry wrote:

****trim excess****

Mankind has has been plagued by piles since the dawn of time. ^_^
TDD
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Till Sandy came along, and rectum.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message

Mankind has has been plagued by piles since the dawn of time. ^_^
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Depending on the soil conditions, most MURBS are already on footings. The only real change would be that the first floor, instead of being apartments or stores or whatever, would be open.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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Im surprised the 150 watt inverter worked. Thats not a terribly large capacity. At the least..Id have hooked up a 400 watt. Start up current for the average motor is pretty high and the furnace is a lot of ons and offs.
Thats something like (1) amp at 110vts. with a 150 watt inverter..and most motors will draw at least 4-5 on startup.
The 150 watt inverters work fine for things like camera battery chargers, electric shavers and the like..but thats about all.
Gunner
-- "
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On 05/11/12 08:07, Gunner wrote:

Depends on the make and model. Better quality inverters quote their running watts, but have a much higher motor start(peak) rating.
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 09:10:07 +1100, terryc

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

Quality or not, I bought this thing last year, didn't use it until last Friday.
Newegg: 1 x ($24.99) Inverter 150W Rosewill RCP-E150C
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Han
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

More: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)- Inverter/dp/B003YMIUD0>
--
Best regards
Han
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