is venting your dryer to the house O.K in winter?

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I have a washer and dryer in downstairs bathroom and in winter I feel it is stupid to vent it outside while the furnace is working hard on both heating and humififying whole house. Will it do damage if I disconnect the outside vent and send the output (through the old pantyhose filter) into the house?
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fyi, Home Depot (and probably any hardware store) sells an inexpensive kit for this that we use. It connects to the end of the dryer's output tube and filters the lint. It works well, and does save on heating.
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Probably not a good idea. First it violates code in most areas. Second if it is a gas dryer there are gas fumes going into the house. Third the moisture it generates will be very localized and could allow mold growth. fourth, it will put a lot of lint into the house, as some lint will still get through both the dryer lint filter as well as your homemade filter. I have seen it done, there has always been a lot of lint around the discharge. Seems like a good idea, but it is not.
Stretch
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Stretch wrote:

Really?
CO detector: $30. If it's not a gas dryer, you get only heat.

Added humidity is generally good in the winter.

Add an A/C filter (or a part of one): $1.00

Conversely, how much lint does one see at the usual discharge outlet?

Total cost to handle any downside problems: $31.00. Savings on heating bill: unknown, but not insignificant.
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Yep. Besides lint, there is some out gassing of some of the non-natural fabric. If antone in your house is slightly allergic, that allergy will come out FAST.

CO detectors sold inth e box stores are UL 2039 detectors. Read their alarm points. Something like 30 ppm for 8 hours before thay alarm?

True, but not like that....

AC filter? I thought the OP wanted heat? If you mean the blue filters, they ain't worth spit....

Quite a bit. You should see where an AC unit is close to the dryer vent.

bill:
But medical bills and funeral expenses may be higher.
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Can you name one?
Nick
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wrote:

I can.
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Which one? Chapter and verse.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

I can't name the the particular number myself, but I believe there is a section that specifies that manufacturer's installation requirements must be followed. I've yet to see a residential gas dryer that did not require venting to the outdoors per the manufacturer's installation manual.
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wrote:

Stretch did it before I could. See his response...
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Regarding venting dryers inside the house...
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu ( snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu) said...

In the province of Ontario, Canada, it is against code to vent a clothes dryer indoors, but it is not as obvious as a simple rule saying a dryer must be vented outdoors.
Under the definitions of terms and phrases section of the code (1.1.3.2) the definition of an EXHAUST DUCT is as follows:
"Exhaust duct means a duct through which air is conveyed from a room or space to the outdoors"
On its own, it requires a stretch of the imagination to see that this covers a clothes dryer. Combined with the fact that dryer manufacturers label the outlet as an "exhaust", it is clear that the code requires, by definition, that an exhaust duct vent to the outdoors.
There is a rule in the OBC that ties clothes dryers directly to the fact that they have an exhaust. Rule 6.2.4.11(3) states:
"Exhaust ducts directly connected to laundry drying equipment shall be independent of other exhaust ducts".
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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if you want water dripping from the ceiling
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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Allergic to the clothes they are wearing? I'm guessing that would have come out the first time they put it on.
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I bought a used house in MA about 25 years ago. Electric dryer vented inside, no vent in bathroom or over stove.
Window frames and inside corners: loads of mildew. Windows sweated and soaked the sills in midwinter. Far too much moisture (and who knows what else inside)
I replaced the range hood with one that vented outside, did the same for the dryer, and squeegeed the tub walls after every shower to keep moisture out of the air.. No more dripping windows, no more mold. When it was really cold out, I'd go as far as to pre-dry myself with a washcloth after showering and wring the water out into the drain instead of putting it all in a towel, and into the air.
-- Email reply: please remove one letter from each side of "@" Spammers are Scammers. Exterminate them.
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No offense, but you really shouldn't be trying to make "educated" guesses, Stretch. Most of your response is pretty far off the mark but not all.
: Probably not a good idea. First it violates code in most areas.
That's odd; not here in NY. Didn't in Chgo when I lived there. Doesn't in Buffalo, NY. How/why would it violate code?
: Second if it is a gas dryer there are gas fumes going into the house. True, maybe ... but most gas dryers I know of and it's been a long, long time since I've seen one, vent the gases up the chimney and still shoot the clothing heat out the dryer vent hose. I seriously doubt any dryer dries the clothies in the combusted air of the gas flames. They use a heat exchanger, same's a furnace, the few that are around. That'd sure make the clothes smell great, wouldn' t it?
: Third the moisture it generates will be very localized and could allow : mold growth. Probably not since he's trying to distribute this around the home. A dryer's also a low duty-cycle appliance - and just the blower on most dryers would push the air well past any doorway - they generate quite a breeze.
fourth, it will put a lot of lint into the house, as some : lint will still get through both the dryer lint filter as well as your : homemade filter. Not necessarily, not even most likely, although I'd suggest one of the units made for that purpose instead of homemaking one, if it can be afforded.
I have seen it done, there has always been a lot of : lint around the discharge. Same here; and quite successfully at that. I DO admit to a very fine dust though, which settles in a white sort of mist in the general area of the dryer so it does generate some dust. Nothing of any consequence though if you normally clean your home.
Seems like a good idea, but it is not.
Seems like a good idea, and it CAN be a good idea. We use it whenever the temps go down near zero or below (farenheit). : : : Stretch Yup, you did stretch just a bit, there <g>
Pop :
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While I can't quote the codes, it's in there. How well do you know the mechanical codes? We have to, it's our job,

You are wwwaaaayyyyy behind the times. Go to a store and look at one. Even the big commercial jobs vent everything through one pipe.

The great smell is fabric softener sheets. Gas dryers don't apply flame to the clothes, just to the barrell of the dryer.

Not at all...
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You're a strange heatman;
: > : Probably not a good idea. First it violates code in most : > areas. : > : > That's odd; not here in NY. Didn't in Chgo when I lived there. : > Doesn't in Buffalo, NY. How/why would it violate code? : > : : While I can't quote the codes, it's in there. How well do you know the : mechanical codes? We have to, it's our job, I don't know the "codes". I call the Code Enforcement office or, in the rural area where I am now, stop in and talk to them. Unlike most people, I don't consider the code people enemies; they're just educated messengers who interpret the codes, just as I used to do with CFR's. : : > : Second if it is a gas dryer there are gas fumes going into the : > house. : > True, maybe ... but most gas dryers I know of and it's been a : > long, long time since I've seen one, vent the gases up the : > chimney and still shoot the clothing heat out the dryer vent : > hose. : : You are wwwaaaayyyyy behind the times. Go to a store and look at one. Even : the big commercial jobs vent everything through one pipe. Sorry, at Sears, 6 miles from here, I looked at one last night, then I went over to Howland Pump and looked at one there, a commercial set of three were on the floor. ALL vented to a chimney. All 4 vented the drying area separately. All 4 used a heat exchanger but it took they guy at Howland to tell me that about the Sears one, although it obviously did. : : > I seriously doubt any dryer dries the clothies in the : > combusted air of the gas flames. They use a heat exchanger, : > same's a furnace, the few that are around. That'd sure make the : > clothes smell great, wouldn' t it? : > : : The great smell is fabric softener sheets. Gas dryers don't apply flame to : the clothes, just to the barrell of the dryer. Makes me wish I had one so I could see if it would set off the CO detector. I know it'll set off the CO2, but I think it's heat & humdity did that; the pipe separated. : : > : > Seems like a good idea, but it is not. : > : > Seems like a good idea, and it CAN be a good idea. We use it : > whenever the temps go down near zero or below (farenheit). : > : : > : : > : Stretch : > Yup, you did stretch just a bit, there <g> : > : : Not at all... : : I'll believe you guys if you can find/quote a verifiable source where it's in the code, any residential code or code that applies to residential. We're not really playing the commercial game here.
Pop
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Err, my kenmore gas drier vents it all through one pipe. Its a few years old. I wouldnt want the exhaust from the unit blowing into my home. I like less carbon monoxide in my air.
If you like more, why not use the oven to heat your home too???
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Pop (& Nick)
International Mechanical Code:
Section 913.2 Exhaust Required. Clothes dryers shall be exhausted in accordance with Section 504.
Section 504.4 Exhaust installation. Dryer exhaust ducts for clothes dryers shall terminate on the outside of the building and shall be equiped with a backdraft damper...... Clothes dryer exhaust ducts shall not be connected to a vent connector, vent or chimney.
See also sections 504.5, 504.6, 504.61, 504.62, 504.7.
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: Pop (& Nick) : : International Mechanical Code: : : Section 913.2 Exhaust Required. Clothes dryers shall be exhausted in : accordance with Section 504. : : Section 504.4 Exhaust installation. Dryer exhaust ducts for clothes : dryers shall terminate on the outside of the building and shall be : equiped with a backdraft damper...... Clothes dryer exhaust ducts shall : not be connected to a vent connector, vent or chimney. : : See also sections 504.5, 504.6, 504.61, 504.62, 504.7. :
Hmm, that was interesting to see and I was ready to apologize, but something looked awfully familiar there. On top of that, being "international" I couldn't find anything in my quick research that would show it to be applicable to anything but commercial construction regs and nothing "national" that seemed to call for it other than a couple of city codes and their construction codes. So, I'm doubting that anything makes it applicable as a coded national requirement like NEC or NFPA etc.. Remember, the context here is the homeowner and what he can/can't do per applicable codes. This is exactly why I often tell people to check with their local code enforcement offices because there can be a lot of surprises.
A quick search showed that what I was right, there was something familiar about it. It's the same place that said, among other things:
"a) Attic furnaces and crawlspace furnaces are not permitted. " but, what's missing there is the fact that they ARE permitted, just under a different section and with caveats. But, this isn't the point here; the next one is:
"d) All dryer vents shall be metal or metal flex. Non-metallic vents for dryers are not permitted. See Section 504.6 and Amendment to 504.6 " Soo, the flexible, nylon-wire-ribbed parts sold in stores with UL and CSA ratings, even ETL probably, and EC, aren't allowable? I respectfully submit that they ARE permitted, just NOT for the commercial construction company doing the original install. Local codes will determine whether they are acceptable or not.
And then:
"All ductwork shall be a closed system and in compliance with the International Mechanical Code Section 603. Use of a stud space or joist space for a supply or plenum return is not permitted. Gypsum ducts are not permitted. Delete Sections 603.5 and 603.5.1. "
Well, I can show you several inspected and approved places where that's done, one of them being my own home when we lived in Chgo, another being my nephew's home, built three years ago, right here in NYS. It's simply not a requirement, OR has exceptions in other areas of the code, just as the sections you quoted from likely do.
This one just plain caught my eye and is another example of how that international code you quoted from isn't a requirement. It says:
"Fuel Fired Appliances See Section 303 for approved and prohibited locations. a) Section 303.3 Prohibited locations Fuel-fired appliances shall not be located in, or obtain combustion air from, any of the following rooms or spaces. 1. Sleeping rooms 2. Bathrooms 3. Toilet rooms 4. Storage closets 5. Surgical rooms "
That's blatantly untrue and there HAS to be a section of exceptions or dependencies somewhere even for an international code. Fuel fired appliances are used in hotel rooms (sleeping rooms) and in my own home, which has now been inspected twice, once before we moved in and three years ago for acquiring a boarding licence to be a foster child home, and the ONLY thing either inspection ever found was too many things plugged into a power strip because its location appeared close to "permanent". It appeared as an "exception" and not a "violation". Oops! Sorry, I lied; they did find a violation - my garage wood stove (a huge one) wasn't considered grandfathered anymore and I had to pull it out. The previous owner here was a fireman and I guess he knew his way around the codes; he built, installed and inspected it <g>. I didn't get that courtesy. Oh, they also considered it an "incinerator", not a wood stove, which made the "rules" a little different. The inspector wouldn't budge on that one. All I had to do tough was take the stovepipe off it and cover the chimney hole - then he passed me. Took about 15 minutes.
Anyway, I guess I should have said "applicable" code to the OPs situation, but I thought that was understood. Guess not.
Not really trying to be a PIA by the way - I just don't care for misperceptions.
Pop
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