incandescent light bulb phase-out in the U.S. (are flood bulbs exempt?)

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LOL!
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wrote:

The CFLs mounted inside of A-line bulbs (GE) look just like standard bulbs -- if looks are important; but I don't see why it matters if the CFL bulb is behind a shade or hidden in a fixture anyway.
Terry McGowan
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Clear CLFs? LOL! You people are so green your brain is moldy.
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I have a TV and a "Kill-A-Watt" meter. My TV consumes 12 watts when "off" and averaging about 70 watts when "on".
As a result, I have a power strip to cut power to my TV for the majority of the day when I am sleeping, at work or commuting, using my computer, or doing other activities besides TV-watching.

I spent my whole life in homes where heat and hot water were done with fossil fuels.

At USA national average, $2/month is about 18 KWH/month, or about 600 watt-hours per day. That is equivalent to all home lighting being restricted to a single 300W halogen torchiere restricted to 2 hours per day, or each day having combined-per-bulb 6 hours of running 100-watt bulbs or 10 60-watt bulbs. Since CFLs can easily cut this by as little as 2/3, make that 3 hours per day of combined operation of 3400W halogen torchiere fixtures, or 9 hours per day and bulb (combined-multiplied) for 100W bulbs, or 15 hours per bulb per day all-done with 60-watters. It appears strongly to me that most Americans use a lot more lighting than equivalent to 3 60-watt incandescents 5 hours a day or 5 of them 3 hours a day.

So you say...
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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wrote:

500W on/5W standby = 100x. Next.

Not worthwhile.

Goody for you. That isn't normal, here. Electric HW and heat pumps are the norm here. A few morons have bought into the "green" thing and have been suckered into LP tankless heaters, but 90% are electric tank heaters.

That's about right; maybe a *little* more. I do know how to calculate Wh.

Whoopie! I don't care. It's there with the pocket lint.

I did. You don't dispute.
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<slight snip to edit for space>

<SNIP from here>
12 watts * 22 hours/day * 365 days/1 year * 1KW/1000W * $.14/KWH $13.49/year in the case of my TV. In my case, the power strip paid for itself in less than a year.
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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Excellent, Don. 12 watts is indeed substantial. I've been wondering why the California Energy Commission folks have been so interested in what they call "phantom loads". You prompt me to measure my TV as well.
Terry McGowan
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wrote:

Wow! WTFC? The Satellite box is several times that and it *hates* being powered off.
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In wrote: > As a result, I have a power strip to cut power to my TV for the

Does your TV remember its settings when power's restored? Mine don't.
--
snipped-for-privacy@iphouse.com St. Paul, MN

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Mine does.
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- Don Klipstein

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There is some fair number of Americans using electricity for home heating and water heaters. Air conditioning is a bightime electricity user, and refrigerators/freezers are very significant.
As of a few months ago, the most recent studies that I could easily find determined that about 9% of American electricity consumption and about 11% of American electric bills were for lighting.
Not that it does not help significantly to cut that 9-11% in half, which appears to me easily do-able. And many Americans have their lighting accounting for well-above-average percentage of their electric bills, and benefit greatly by using energy-efficient lighting. For example, most apartment renters in the metropolitan areas of NYC, Philadelphia and Chicago - where electricity cost is above national average. Also many residents of rowhouses/townhouses/"brownstones" and most with gas or oil heat.
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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Am 16.09.11 07:21, schrieb Don Klipstein:

As for residential indoor consumption in pre-ban Europe, the figures were more like one-third of yours. Please check if your sources differentiate between residential and other.
<http://greenwashinglamps.wordpress.com/category/energy-statistics/u-s-energy-statistics/

But is there any law *forcing* these unfortunate people to use incandescent bulbs instead of cfl or led lighting?
And, by which logic do higher electric rates increase the percentage of electric bills caused by lighting? Wouldn't economics suggest that a high rate increases the incentive to save electricity where it subjectively hurts the billpayer the least? If the billpayer chooses to use compact mercury-fluorescent lamps instead of some incandescents, fine. They're not illegal, and first cost is pretty low thanks to darling China.
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IIRC, my figures are residential ones.
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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It varies by area and climate in the U.S. Energy Star says residential lighting is 12% of the annual energy bill for a typical single home. See: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product. The dollar value of that 12% is $264 per year.
Terry McGowan
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wrote:

Yah, I suspect your air conditioners run 24/7/365 trying to pump all that hot air out of your house.
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I suspect there is a constant sucking sound coming from your ears.
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On 9/12/2011 6:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

+2
--
Jack
Got Change: And the Change SUCKS!
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 20:13:33 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

There is no reason why a halogen incandescent lamp cannot be desiogned with the same light diffucing coating used for regular incandescent lamps. Have you ever seen a normal incandescent lamp in a clear bulb? It is also rather blinding. The issue of "blinding" is not related to halogen or non-halogen.
Vic Roberts http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com http://www.cflfacts.com sci.engr.lighting Rogues Gallery http://www.langmuir.org To reply via e-mail: replace xyz with vdr in the Reply to: address or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.
This information is provided for educational purposes only. It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web site without written permission.
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wrote:

Certainly. I have a lifetime supply squirreled away. I have something like 50 of them around my house (one of many reasons CFL is out). If you'd been reading, you would have known this.

Sure it is.
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Did you not say before that you like clear incandescents of the kinds being banned (which are mostly A19)? GE has four A19 medium-base clear halogens that meet the energy efficiency standard for escaping the 2012-2014 ban. I have seen them at Target.
Philips has two soft-whitish A19 halogens that meet the energy efficiency standard. One consumes 40 watts to produce 800 lumens, not far short of 840-890 lumens typical of 60W 120V incandescents rated 1,000 hours. The other consumes 70 watts to produce 1600 lumens, which is about 93% of usual of a "full blast" name brand 750-hour-rated 100W 120V incandescent. And about 45% brighter than most dollar store 100W incandescents.
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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