If a basement is sealed can it still test + for radon?

Page 2 of 2  
Ether Jones wrote:

The radon should be well below 4 pc/l If not you should fix it and just get a quieter fan. Remember, the fan may be an anoyance but radon can kill you. Caulk if you need to but can you afford to be a skeptic??
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tmurf.1 wrote:

Says who? The radon remediation industry?
Do a little research. Follow the money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So you might buy a few test kits and turn off the fan, then run it 12 hours per day if it's more than 4, then 6 if it's less than 4 or 18 if more, and so on. With noise as the issue, you might replace the fan with a long-life light bulb at the bottom of a tall chimney.
The EPA says a non-smoker continuously exposed to 4 pCi/l has a lifetime risk of dying of lung cancer of 73 in 10,000, ie odds of 139 to 1. At 1.25 (close to the 1.3 average indoor level) it's down to 23/10K, ie 435:1. At 0.4 (the average outdoor level), it's 23/100K, ie 4,348:1. So why stop at 4? Will an electronic air filter help? The EPA plans to do more research on that.
The NSC gives 2:1 (men) and 3:1 (women) odds for contracting heart disease, 3:1 for contracting diabetes, 228:1 for death as a car occupant, 1,310:1 for death by medical complications, 4,857:1 for death as a bicyle rider, 12,417:1 for legal intervention involving firearm discharge, 55,597:1 for death by legal execution, 56,439:1 for death by lightning, 286,537:1 for ignition or melting of nightwear, 372,498:1 for death by contact with venemous spiders, 413,887:1 for death by flood, and 1,241,661:1 for death by contact with venemous snakes or lizards.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

The key word there is "continuously". Unless you sleep in the basement and plan to stay in this house for 30 years, I wouldn't worry about 4pCi/l
BTW, are all of EPA's other recommendations sensible and unaffected by politics and money?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and plan to stay in this house for 30 years, I wouldn't worry about 4pCi/l
I would, based on the death statistics.

Dunno, but it seems to me this standard should be tightened, based on the risk and the cost of the fix.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Figures don't lie, but liars can figure.
Follow the money.

Perhaps we should pass a national law requiring all automobile drivers to wear crash helmets, based on the risk and the cost of the fix.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The lifetime odds of dying from radon at 4 pCi/l (139:1 for a non-smoker) are about half the odds of death in a car (228:1), so it's strange that we've spent double to avoid auto deaths, as PE Drew Gillett points out...

The EPA is apparently still looking into electronic air cleaners, which can't reduce the gas concentration but can reduce the solid daughters of radon particles in house dust that get into our lungs and cause problems. I like the Envirosept charged-media filter, which uses a lot less power (under 2 watts) than a HEPA filter.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.