If a basement is sealed can it still test + for radon?

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Just bought our home 4 months ago. It tested positive for radon (but just barely). The seller agreed to install an active radon reducer fan-type. It runs all the time, sucking air from under the basement slab. After recent testing, the radon leven was very very low.
I see is that there are many large cracks in the floor. Around the outside edge runs a gap at least a quarter inch. Then there are several shrinkage cracks also very large.
If I were to seal every one of these cracks with urethane calk and thus make the basement airtight, would the radon problem go away?
Or can radon leach through concrete block and floors? I sure would like to shut off that noisy 24-7 fan and convert it to a basement bathroom vent to the outside.
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46erjoe wrote:

If you could cure radon with a caulk gun, do you think people would be installing systems like the one you have?
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no, the problem will continue. radon is unhealthy so only replace the noisy fan with a quiet one. search for radon at energy federation: http://www.energyfederation.org/consumer/default.php/cPath/30_406_1304
46erjoe wrote:

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46erjoe wrote:

It might, if there were a vapor barrier under the slab.

Sure, but you might put poly film on the floor with carpet over that and poly film on the walls with foamboard over that.
Nick
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wrote:

Is this a case where a squirrel cage fan would be better because it is, aiui, quieter? Or is their capacity too low? Or some other problem.
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46erjoe wrote:

If the radon level was "just barely" over limit with large cracks in the floor, then yes, sealing the large cracks thoroughly will very likely reduce the radon level below the EPA recommended remediation level.
Are you a non-smoker? Do you spend only occasional time in the basement? You could just turn the fan off and stop worrying about it. Impartial researchers and medical people with no monetary incentive to fuel the scare campaign are skeptical of the radon hysteria.
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If your a smoker you dont care about your health or early death!
True radon makes lung cancer more likely if you smoke
but smokers dont care....
or they wouldnt smoke.......
ANYONE WHO SMOKES TODAY DOESNT HAVE THEIR HEAD SCREWED ON RIGHT1
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We've been discussing NON-smokers, who are about twice as likely to die of lung cancer than in an auto accident, with odds of 139:1 vs 228:1, in a house with a radon mitigation system that maintains the indoor level at the EPA-recommended max pCi/l limit.
Based on death statistics and Drew's description of how the 4 pCi/l limit was picked, it seems to me that homeowners should try harder to achieve lower radon concentrations, in order to reduce this serious risk.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

go check the info, the rate of lung cancer for smokers in high radon are like 4 times either smoking or radon. combo rate is bad but smokers are risk takers to begin with and really dont care.
sadly till they get cancer and are dying...
thus my on comment rant about smokers
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

It's not a "serious risk".
Results from Radon tests performed in the basement are not indicative of Radon levels in the rest of the house.
Unless you live in the basement, and plan to stay in the house for 30 years, find something else to worry about.
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I disagree.

Who said anything about basements?
Nick
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all radon tests are done in basements
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wrote:

Only because that is the point of entry. If you have radon in the basement, you want to remove it at that point so that it does not waft it's way up through the rest of the structure.
CWM
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Charlie Morgan wrote:

older homes leak so much air, and radon is heavier than air...
its probably not a issue unless you live in the basement.
anyone concerned can do a radon test upstairs. usually the normal opening and closing of doors windows furnace venting etc dissapate radon.
when testing they demand the home be sealed for the week of the test....
life is full of risks, test the upstairs, I had a friend do that in a home with a number of over 8 in basement, upstairs the number was near background.
she still plans on getting a radon control system someday befor she sells, but her basement is storage only so she isnt concerned
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wrote:

Radon is heavier than air... so how does it get into the basement? Does air in the basement ever get used in forced air heating systems? Can there ever be negative pressure in a house that might draw something heavier than air up through the house? What would cause it? Ohhhhh!
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Furnace and chimney flues create negative pressure so does weather changes when low pressure fronts come thru.
plus stuff tends to go from higher pressure under ground to lower pressure ambient air pressure, add cracks or voids just makes it worse
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nope. The standard procedure around here is to continue living in the house as you normally do. If that means opening the windows on a cool summer day, then so be it.
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If you have a sump pump the radon can leach in via the sump pump pit.
Sealing the cracks can help but it probably wont get you as low as the 24/7 fan you have now.

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The installers sealed the sump pump well with urethane foam.
What I hear you folks saying is that yes, radon can pass through walls and floors... bend steel with his bare hands, and who ...
Radon evacuation systems suck!
On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 09:11:57 -0600, "Jay Stootzmann"

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46erjoe wrote:

If the radon level was "just barely" over limit with large cracks in the floor, then yes, sealing the large cracks thoroughly will very likely reduce the radon level below the EPA recommended remediation level.
Are you a non-smoker? Do you spend only occasional time in the basement? You could just turn the fan off and stop worrying about it. Impartial researchers and medical people with no monetary incentive to fuel the scare campaign are skeptical of the radon hysteria.
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