How to seal a mouth guard?

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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I think the alcohol and/or alcohol-based dental rinse may have damaged the material and even caused the cracking in the device.

No, I don't think even dried Super Glue would be safe to keep in your mouth overnight. And, I think the Super Glue will be brittle and not compatible with the device.
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On 9/17/2013 10:17 AM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Have you asked the dentist? Tried denture cleaning tablets?
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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I doubt that any type of sealant would work, and I would be concerned about using any type of sealant on a device that you keep in your mouth overnight.
I first tried going to the company website, and then tried doing a Google search for: --> nti-tss plus cleaning <--
Looks like any alcohol-based cleaning is a bad idea. One source suggested maybe dilute vinegar would help once in a while -- for build-up of deposits, I think.
But, here's what I found overall: http://www.kellerlab.com/154/index/sonic-cleaner.php
http://www.smileshop.com/orstore/productsearchgrid.aspx?categoryid=Retainer-Brite
http://www.kellerlab.com/tinymce/filemanager/files/NTI%20Plus%20Patient%20Consent.Owners%20Manual.pdf
Each morning, clean the appliance thoroughly with cool, not hot, water, and brush with regular toothpaste. Do not put it in the
dishwasher or microwave! Once in a while you may have to soak it for a half hour in diluted white vinegar if crusty deposits are starting to develop. Soak, then brush.
What is the NTI-tss Plus made of? The NTI-tss Plus is made from a safe, clear, plastic that is non-absorbent and will not stain. The plastics are non-allergenic, and can be easily cleaned with a toothbrush or safe, non-alcoholic cleanser.
What is it made of?
The NTI-tss Plus is made of a safe, clear, hard
thermoplastic material. It's non-porous so it
won't stain or absorb odors. It's non-allergenic.
And easy to care for. simply clean with a
Sonic Cleaner or rinse with water or alcohol-free
solution.
Good luck.
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That's what I was afraid of. I wouldn't use any kind of oil-based sealant, such as is used on decks, but I was hoping there might be some kind of plastic sealant that dries to a hard, non-porous finish. I think any kind of epoxy would be too thick.

I've done that for years. It's not working anymore.

I don't see any "crusty" deposits. It is somewhat stained (yellowish-brown, like coffee-stained teeth).

The "will not stain" part is not true.

The "won't stain or absorb odors" is not true. Well, I don't know if the odors were "absorbed" or generated natively. ;-)

I've had it cleaned a few times by the dentist using their sonic cleaner. Didn;t make much difference as far as I could tell.
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On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 5:28:04 PM UTC-4, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I think it's time to bite the bullet, as it were, break down, and buy a new one. You got "several years" out of the first one. No reason you won't get "several years" out of the next one.
Like I said before, lots cheaper than fixing the damage from grinding your teeth.
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On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 20:00:01 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You don't understand. Now it's personal -- between me and the mouth guard. I can always get a new mouth guard. I only get a few chances to tackle a challenging problem that is not even close to being worth the effort. ;-)
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On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 22:49:35 -0700, Jennifer Murphy

I understand that. 40 years ago I spent 10 dollars on parts for an 8 dollar electric coffee pot and I don't even drink coffee.
I still do similar things.
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wrote:

But it's not even the $10. How many hours did you spend and how many trips to the hardware store?

Yea! At least one other similar sufferer. I wish I had a nickel for every hour I ever spend on a uselsss, but irresistable, project. Actually, now that I think of it, if I just had the hours back, I'd be a lot younger. ;-)
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On Thursday, September 19, 2013 1:49:35 AM UTC-4, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

As long as you admit that it's not worth the effort, have at it!
So many people come on here looking for cockamaime solutions to common problems, spending dollars to save dimes... It's rare when someone actually realizes that they are pursuing a fruitless endeavor.
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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Go to the news group sci.med.dentistry. There is at least one dentist who posts there. Steven Bornfeld
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:
...snip...

Thanks for that suggestion. I posted a question there and have already received a nice reply from Steven.
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"Jennifer Murphy" wrote in message
This is an odd request, but this forum has come up with amazing solutions to odd requests so many times...
I have fairly severe bruxism (teeth grinding). I've fractured several teeth over the years. My previous dentist gave me a standard mouth guard. I continued to fracture teeth. My current dentist recommended a device called an "NTI-TSS" (nociceptive trigeminal inhibitor tension suppression system). It's a tiny mouth guard that fits over just the front teeth. The theory is that the front teeth resist clenching whereas the back teeth are triggerred to clench when they sense something to chew (biting vs chewing).
http://www.kellerlab.com/115/products/nti-tss-plus.php
In any case, my NTI is starting to exhibit an unpleasant odor. I think the problem is that it has developed some tiny cracks between the hard outer shell that stop the clenching and the inner, softer material that fits snugly around the teeth. These cracks are now serving as breeding grounds for bacteria. This problem didn't occur for the first several years I had the device, which is why I think it is related to a deterioration of the seal.
I've tried soaking it in alcohol and various antibacterial rinses. This cures the problem for a few days. I would like a more permanent solution.
Here's my question. Is there a material that I can use to seal the whole device? I'm thinking of some type of acrylic that would seep into all of the cracks and form a barrier to the bacteria getting back in there. I'd soak it in alcohol to kill the bacteria than apply the seal.
Whatever it is would have to be safe to have in my mouth every night.
If that fails, I guess I'll go get a new device. They are about $500, so if I can make this one last longer, I'd like to.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Could you check with a dentist to see if the (glue) they use to glue caps on teeth would work as it may be thin enough to fill fine cracks. WW
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