How to seal a mouth guard?

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This is an odd request, but this forum has come up with amazing solutions to odd requests so many times...
I have fairly severe bruxism (teeth grinding). I've fractured several teeth over the years. My previous dentist gave me a standard mouth guard. I continued to fracture teeth. My current dentist recommended a device called an "NTI-TSS" (nociceptive trigeminal inhibitor tension suppression system). It's a tiny mouth guard that fits over just the front teeth. The theory is that the front teeth resist clenching whereas the back teeth are triggerred to clench when they sense something to chew (biting vs chewing).
http://www.kellerlab.com/115/products/nti-tss-plus.php
In any case, my NTI is starting to exhibit an unpleasant odor. I think the problem is that it has developed some tiny cracks between the hard outer shell that stop the clenching and the inner, softer material that fits snugly around the teeth. These cracks are now serving as breeding grounds for bacteria. This problem didn't occur for the first several years I had the device, which is why I think it is related to a deterioration of the seal.
I've tried soaking it in alcohol and various antibacterial rinses. This cures the problem for a few days. I would like a more permanent solution.
Here's my question. Is there a material that I can use to seal the whole device? I'm thinking of some type of acrylic that would seep into all of the cracks and form a barrier to the bacteria getting back in there. I'd soak it in alcohol to kill the bacteria than apply the seal.
Whatever it is would have to be safe to have in my mouth every night.
If that fails, I guess I'll go get a new device. They are about $500, so if I can make this one last longer, I'd like to.
Thanks for any suggestions.
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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Since you use it only at night, why not soak it in an alcohol mouth wash during the day?
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Good suggestion. I'd recommend soaking in 'digestible' alcohol like EverClear 190 proof. That way the residu will NOT harm you. But soaking in alcohol is likely to destroy the plastics. Causes 'crazing' at the surface.
There is a 'commercically' available epoxy like goo that is used in the Electronic industry to encapsulate 'anything' for implanting inside the human body.
Sorry, don't remember the name but it sounds exactly like what you describe. Look under FDA approved Medical Electronics encapsulation products.
Be sure to 'sterilize' as much as possible the item before encapsulating though. bleach kills EVERYTHING - bacteria, mold, virii; and now Clorox has some strange wetting agent added to their bleach.
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wrote:

I don't want to "encapsulate" it, just seal it. The inside of the device fits tightly over the front teeth. Anything that is more than a seal and it won't fit any more.
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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 08:47:11 -0700, Jennifer Murphy

I thought he meant to just push the stuff in the cracks, or wherever you planned to put it.
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wrote:

I tried that and it mostly works, but it's messy and inconvenient. It also tastes bad. And I think I remember asking the dentist about it and was told that alcohol is not good for the plastic. I also tried soaking it in a dental antibacterial rinse. Still messy.
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On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 10:17:40 AM UTC-4, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

You said the first one lasted "several years." For the sake of argument let's say the device lasted 5 years. That's $100/year, or about 27 cents per day to save you THOUSANDS of dollars on cosmetic dentistry.
Seems like a wise investment to me.
There is nothing you can soak this in that will permanently stop the bacteria growth, especially now that the bacteria have presumably gained a proverbial foothold down deep in the presumably porous foam core of the device.
There is nothing durable you can paint on this device that will not be poisonous to you, either.
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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 07:17:40 -0700, Jennifer Murphy
guard?:

You could try one of these
http://www.bing.com/shopping/title-boxing-single-guard-mouthpiece-single-clear/p/CCA4FAF63427FE815020?q=boxing+mouthpieces&lpq=boxing%20mouthpieces&FORM=HURE
They are a lot cheaper than what the quacks try to sell you, so you don't have much too lose and you do have a lot to gain.
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wrote:

Those are standard mouth guards. As I said in my original post, they don't work for me. The "theory" is that they actually cause the rear teeth to clench more.
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On 9/17/2013 8:57 AM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Can you just cut off the back end so they don't touch the rear teeth?
Can they stand heat? Bacteria doesn't like boiling water.
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The problem there is that it won't stay put. Also, it it's too small, there's a risk of aspirating it. The NTI grabs the teeth very tightly to avoid those problems.

No, I was specifically told not to boil it or even wash it in very hot water. I might have violated that last part a time or two, which could be part of the reason that it has become degraded.
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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 10:26:15 -0700, Jennifer Murphy

I don't know about the ones in the URL above, but FTR when I anticipated a fight, a mugging by someone I knew, I bought a mouth guard meant for football players iirc.
I followed the instructions and heated it in very hot or boiling water, waited the amount of time it said, then bit down on it to make it mold to my teeth. And it did.
The guy never tried to fight me. I don't remember how tight it was and I can't check because my teeth have moved around a bit.
In the store they only had one size, but on the web they probably have enough sizes to fit anyone.
(I remmeber now. I had one that was meant to move my teeth into position when I was 13 years old, the last step in having braces (at the time. I think different methods are used now.) . It worked too and I still have it 50 years later, but it wouldn't fit my mouth even 30 years ago, so I had to buy the other one.

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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I don't have an answer for you but this website may be useful in how to keep the thing clean. http://www.ehow.com/way_5665486_homemade-cleaners-mouthguard.html
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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 16:07:33 +0000 (UTC), "badgolferman"

Interesting suggestions. I'll give them a try. I've tried rinsing it each morning in alcohol and a dental rinse without success. I think the little buggers have gotten a foothold (do they have feet?) and unless I get it sealed, nothing will work because of the environment it is in 8 hours a day.
Thanks
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On 9/17/2013 10:42 AM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I don't think rinsing it will help the critters deep in the cracks. You gotta get the killer down where they are.
I'd try putting it in a bath of the strongest disinfectant you think it will stand and pulling a vacuum on it with a seal-a-meal or some such to suck the air out of the cracks to let the killer in when you remove the vacuum.
You can even "boil" the liquid out of the cracks at relatively low temperature, but you'll need a better vacuum than you can get out of a kitchen appliance.
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Why wouldn't the rinse penetrate every crack? Surely rinse molecules and smaller than bacteria?

Are you saying there's some effect like surface tension or something that traps tiny air bubbles deep in the cracks and prevents the rinse from getting everywhere?

If that's what it takes, I'll just get a new device. ;-) But it would be a fun science experiment. So many interesting projects, so little time.
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There are so many dentistry schools in the USA, many with people trying to earn tenure through research, that you could probably locate someone investigating mouth guards for bruxism, and she might know the answers to most questions.
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On 9/17/2013 12:08 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I can't tell how big the cracks are, but if they're small, it's not about molecular size, it's about surface tension. A small amount of air can completely prevent liquid from entering a crack. The vacuum removes the air so the liquid gets sucked into the crack when you remove the vacuum. You can do a similar thing with pressure overcoming the resistance of the air pocket. A more difficult problem is the mouth slime that's in there. Maybe hit it with high pressure air to drive out some of the slime before the vacuum.

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>

I haven't read all of the responses in here, so my apologies if someone has already suggested using a product like Polygrip, or anything that's used to hold dentures in place.
It might be a bit hard to pull your mouth guard off, but if you pull slowly it should come off without harming your teeth.
--
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I went to the local hardware store. The only thing that looked like it might work as a sealer was Super Glue or Crazy Glue (Cyanoacrylate). When I have used it in the past to make repairs, I recall it penetrating into cracks very rapidly and leaving almost no residue. I think it would get into even the tiniest cracks and it would kill anything.
But is it safe to have in my mouth even after it is completely dry and cured?
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