How to drill a 1" hole in a steel-clad entry door

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Rebel1 wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/Search?keyword=door+brass+viewer&selectedCatgry=SEARCH+ALL&langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053&Ns=None&Ntpr=1&Ntpc=1
http://www.milwaukeetool.com/accessories/drilling-accessories/metal-drilling/step-drill-bits
We know what you're trying to do.
The only excuse for a 1" peep-hole is so you can shoot through it. Because, if you're not going to shoot through it, a 3/8" peeper or video camera would work.
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On 4/19/2012 6:52 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Actually, 1" offers a beautiful view. Trot down to Home Depot and take a look and compare it to smaller viewers.
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Before spending that kind of money for something you'll use once, pull the hinge pins and take the door to your local lumber yard, or a machine shop. They'll make the hole for you, and I doubt it will cost over $10.
But there have been lots of other good advice too.
Plus, dont you know any friends or relatives with tools? A 6pack of beer will probably get the job done by one of them.
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On 4/20/2012 12:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

It's a bit tough squeezing a 36x80" door into my Camry trunk. Also, it would leave the house wide open to burglars while I'm away. I've already recently been "burgled."
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And finally, before you drill that hole, are you sure you need it?
I ask because once at work I was told to drill holes in steel doors for a similar peephole.
I found the doors were all solid, but - next to a window. (like a motel room setup)
I couldn't see any point in the peephole, it didn't seem to add any security to what was already there. Of course my boss told me to do it anyway, so I did, but at least I raised the issue first.
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Since I already had a set of wood-boring spade bits that included 1", I went ahead and used it successfully, working with a 1/8" pilot hole and both sides toward the center. Turns out that the thickness of the cladding is only 1/32" and the core is foam. Here's what I used:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Irwin-1-Lock-N-Load-Speedbor-2000-Spade-Drill-Bit-88816-6pk-/260873813683?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cbd4a7eb3
Many thanks to all for your helpful comments. Dennis was right about the type of bit to use, despite being designed for wood.
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Jes exactly WHAT IS the cladding material? I find it hard to believe it is steel and you got through it with a spade bit, regardless of thickness.
nb
--
vi --the heart of evil!

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On 4/20/2012 10:25 AM, notbob wrote:

As Dennis said, it's really a soft steel. A magnet sticks to it. The seal around the door is also magnetic, like on a refrigerator, for a good weather-proof seal.
My micrometer gives the actual thickness of the steel as 0.026".
R1
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