How to Cut Corrugated Metal Roofing?

Eduardo blew some of the 2' x 12' galvanized, corrugated steel roofing material off of my barn, and I had to replace most of 2 sheets.
I didn't have any power on Saturday to cut it off, so I just nailed it up and let it run long off the eave of the roof, but now I have to cut it off flush with the rest of the roof.
Can anyone tell me what I should use to cut this stuff?
My brother (a contractor) says I should just put a plywood blade into my circular saw backwards, wear safety goggles and earplugs, grit my teeth and let 'er rip ... but somehow that sounds a little scary to me on an 18' ladder.
Any ideas?
Thanks,
Joe
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Jones wrote:

...
What gauge material? If it's anything heavier than 26, for just a few sheets I'd go w/ the Sawzall metal blade if it's in place already. I've heard of the other "trick" but no experience w/ trying it. I might try one on the ground to see what works. Any way to stay on the roof and work from the top instead of off the ladder?
BTW, I thought Ed only had 50-ish mph winds by the time it got there or was there a local spawned t-storm? Or is this an open barn that the wind can get under the roof? Seemed like shouldn't have lost much for what I heard of the storm so wonder if was adequately fastened down initially...just a thought/consideration from far away.
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Because it's corrogated, there's no easy way to keep the sawsall grounded against the metal while cutting, which means that its going to be really hard to control the beast against it's reciprocating motion. A light circular saw may be easier to control in this application.
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I've heard of people doing that, but I've never tried it, nor do I plan to. I'd use a jig saw with a metal cutting blade.
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Jones wrote:

I have heard of doing the "backwards blade" thing but I have never done it or seen it done> Has your brother actually done this or just re-telling a story?
I would cut it with a metal cutting abrasive blade in my worm drive saw. I have cut LOTS of corrogated roofing material with metal cutting abrasive blades
works fine
If you want a really straigth, cut screw down a guide for your saw....one less thing to worry about while you're 18' up.
cheers Bob
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I was a steel erection contractor for nine years, and cut hundreds of sheets of corrugated panels on carports.
I have tried SawZalla, circular blades, and many other things.
There are two things that work. One is a specialized cutter that has the same profile as your panel. That is, the teeth and ridges match your metal EXACTLY, and then it works like a giant paper cutter.
The second thing is some Wiss snips in good condition. Depending on the direction you cut, use the proper cutter, either right or left. It is a little slow, and you have to pull the cutoff out slightly to keep from jamming the blades. But it is the easiest way I found. Particularly that you are only cutting a couple of panels.
Other guys are telling you to cut them with a SawZall? Circular saw? Jig saw? Please let me know when and where you guys are going to do this. I want to bring a lawn chair, some adult beverages, and a video camera. And, I'll stop and pick up a big box of Band-Aids, too. Been there, done that, used the Band-Aids. This stuff is usually 26 or 29 ga. and will jump and dance all over the place. Hard to clamp down, keep from distorting, get a straight cut, or get anything but a terribly ragged edge.
I am currently cutting 39" wide panels for a cover for my wood pile. I am using my Wiss snips. Just pop a line with a chalk line, and you'll get it pretty close in the valleys.
Do whatever you want, but please report which way was the easiest. Sometimes it's just the simplest tool in the box along with some patience and craftsmanship.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Plasma cutter. You'll be done in seconds. A perfect task for one of the small units that has a built in compressor, runs on a regular 20A 120V circuit and has about an 1/8" cutting capacity.
Pete C.
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Steve B wrote:

My sympathy for your difficulties......the 20 gage material I worked with cut just fine with my Milwaukee worn drive & a metal cutting abrasive blade.
Perhaps you needed a better setup?
Milwaukee power shear works well also, a practiced hand can get a nice clean staight edge.
cheers Bob
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a friend was helping me with the corrugated metal once.
we tried the backward saw blade and it worked just fine. but be careful-the metal will flop around. have someone hold it if you can.
also, as someone suggested, use goggles and ear plugs.
Eduardo blew some of the 2' x 12' galvanized, corrugated steel roofing material off of my barn, and I had to replace most of 2 sheets.
I didn't have any power on Saturday to cut it off, so I just nailed it up and let it run long off the eave of the roof, but now I have to cut it off flush with the rest of the roof.
Can anyone tell me what I should use to cut this stuff?
My brother (a contractor) says I should just put a plywood blade into my circular saw backwards, wear safety goggles and earplugs, grit my teeth and let 'er rip ... but somehow that sounds a little scary to me on an 18' ladder.
Any ideas?
Thanks,
Joe
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-snip-

I've used the plywood blade on corrugated-- and for a really good time, an old 275 gallon oil barrel. Actually, I've used a crosscut blade backwards with limited success-- and a plywood blade the right way with good results. It burns its way through, so a steady pressure gets the job done-- and watch for sparks & metal bits falling in leaves.
It is indeed noisy- but you have a lot more control than you would with a sawzall.
Jim
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The best cut is using a metal cutting carbide blade. These blades are a bit expensive ($50 type). Morse, DML, Tenryu are some prime manufacturers. It will be well worth while if you do other metal work. You can use the blade on a circular saw or worm drive that you own, but they do make dedicated saws that catch all the chips, etc. Works great cutting angle iron, plate, sheet metal, etc. In a regular saw you will get lots of chips, but they are not hot - wear goggles.
Abrasive blades will work, but can give a burred, burned type edge. Plywood blade backwards is slow - plywood blade forward works better for me. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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