Plastic corrugated roofing

I have a 8x6 shed and building a framework so that I can have an extended covered area, I will be using platic corrugated sheet for the sloping roof. Is it possible to bend a lip at the high end to stop rain running down the inside. thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ss wrote:

No, the corrugations will prevent this
Just tuck the end under the edge of the shed roof
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/03/2013 20:05, Bob Minchin wrote:

Nope, the extension is going from the end of the shed so although I can tuck under at one edge the rest of the extension will be over fresh air and a slope from back to front.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ss wrote:

I think you can get a moulding that is meant to seal against a wall plate. adapting that will get you to a straight line to which you can add something to give a drip edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have sealed a folded ridge sheet to box section roofing using expanding foam.
I suppose *light* lead flashing might form into the gulleys slightly but I don't think you could stop wind blowing snow and light rain up the gaps on anything other than a steep pitch roof.
Trimming the excess foam with a knife exposes significant voids.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 10:19:48 +0000, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm having trouble imagining where this extension bit of roof is going. Is it an extension away from the side of the shed at shed roof eaves level or an extension from a gable end of the of the sheds pitched roof (assuming it has a pitched roof)?

You can certainly get moulded ridge pieces and I thing moulded to flat bits as well. The latter would be used to butt against a wall with the roofing sheet underneath and flashing into the wall and over the top edge along the top of the flat bit.

Should be able to form lead to the corrugations without too much trouble, but probably best to do in situ which might not be easy as the roofing sheet isn't load bearing...

Domestic "foam in a can" I agreed more voids than swiss cheese. You can get foams that are much more uniform and aimed at the commercial/trade market, the low expansion ones?
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ss wrote:

No, but you could roughen the surface and run a bead of roof sealant along there.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Mar 2013 19:40:26 +0000, ss wrote:

You could always use a roll of flashing tape to form a peak along the join between the two sheets.
Removes a little bit of light but it should make it water tight and also should be fairly mouldable into the corrugations.
Cheers
Dave R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why is it that this stuff lasts for maybe 6 years then suddenly goes milky and brittle? One would have thought if it were the UV it would happen gradually.
This Novolux will self destruct in 6 years, thank you for using it..
Brian
--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"ss" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.