How to clean aluminum baking pans used for roasting. Black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.

How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?... there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues
How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar, baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?... especially without need for any elbow grease!
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Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting.
How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?... there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove residues.
How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar, baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?... especially without need for any elbow grease!
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there is a product used in the restaurant business called "sok off" which does as you ask and truely without elbow grease.
snipped-for-privacy@zurich.csail.mit.edu wrote:

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Italian Mason wrote:

If the stuff works that well I'm definitely buying some. I Googled "sok off" and came up with only a couple of hits. There's "Soak Off" which also only returned a few hits. Where do you get yours?
R
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snipped-for-privacy@zurich.csail.mit.edu wrote:

3M pad, full strength Dawn, elbow grease. Be a fanatic about cookie sheets, which should be bright and shiny. Roasters can be dark and it doesn't matter. Or pitch the old one, buy a new stainless one.
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There is a product called aluminum foil which obviates the need for all that elbow grease, etc. Don't generally like to advocate waste, but here it's the foil(which is recyclable in some jurisdictions) vs. the hot water and detergent. BTW when I have a large pan, but only regular foil at hand, I combine two pieces with a tightly double- folded seam like a metal roof seam, running something hard along it to seal. Hardly ever leaks.
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Sev wrote:

I've heard of that stuff. The issue of dark or shiny for cooking delicate stuff is the outside of the pan. Some recipes burn on the bottom before the rest is done if the sheet is too dark. For roasting, dark pan cooks faster and that might not agree with some recipes. It's a lot harder to remove burnt on grease than it is to properly clean pans after each use.
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: snipped-for-privacy@zurich.csail.mit.edu wrote: : :> Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting. :> :> How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?... :> there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove :> residues. :> :> How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham :> Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar, :> baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?... :> especially without need for any elbow grease! :> :3M pad, full strength Dawn, elbow grease. Be a fanatic about cookie :sheets, which should be bright and shiny. Roasters can be dark and it :doesn't matter. Or pitch the old one, buy a new stainless one.
For cookies I use a teflon coated pan. I don't bake cookies on my aluminum cookie sheet anymore. I use it for other oven tasks, not cookies. Stainless, it seems to me, would have problems of its own. Teflon cleans so readily, it's really just the thing for cookies. Cleans in a snap. Must use plastic utensils and scrubbers, however!
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wrote:

My advice would be to either leave all the black scorched residue or throw them away and purchase stainless or enamel based utensils. Leaving them black would keep the surface sealed. cleaning would open the surface and allow minute particles enter the food you cook. It has been suggested else where that aluminium has accumulative effect on the body/ brain and could be the result of altzimers and associated problems. Why take the risk to save a few pennies

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On 15 Sep 2006 00:24:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@zurich.csail.mit.edu wrote:
:Scorched food residues. Aluminum baking pans used for roasting. : :How do you clean an aluminum baking pan that was used for roasting?... :there are baked on black, dark brown, light brown difficult to remove :residues. : :How would that home cleaning remedies guy on public television, Graham :Haley, clean it with some compound of various proportions of vinegar, :baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar or other substances?... :especially without need for any elbow grease!
I have an aluminum cookie sheet that has had black stuff baked onto it for upwards of 30 years. I gave up trying to keep it clean. I don't normally cook anything on it that adds to the residue, so a lot of the black stuff has come off. It's half shiny metalic, half black residue. Big deal.
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On 15 Sep 2006 00:08:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@zurich.csail.mit.edu wrote:

Heat it up until it glows, and dump water into it? Use this stuff? http://www.robotcoupe.net/Qstore/p000759.htm
Throw the crap away and buy decent cookware?
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wrote:

Automatic dishwasher detergent is a really strong cleaner. Heat up enough water to fill a container large enough to hold the item you want cleaned,then dissolve some automatic dishwasher(gel dissolves best) detergent into it and pour into the container (or put hot water into the container and mix in the detergent)then immerse the item. Let it soak until the stuff is eaten away.It helps if the solution is kept hot,and for really tough deposits,you may have to replace with a fresh batch of solution.
The problem is then finding a sufficiently large container for your item. ;-)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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It's bound to happen... if anyone suggests oven cleaner, do not do it. If you want some amusement value, go outside, take some oven cleaner and spray it on a sheet of AL foil, quickly ball it up, and leave it on a non flammable surface until the exothermic reaction starts it smoking. ;)
I've had some badly scorched sheets. A couple times i scrubbed them with a stainless steel scrubby (love them!)... I've also "seasoned" a few by coating with light oil and baking till black... like you would cast iron. The problem with cookie sheets and scrubbing is that you will micro scratch the sheet, which will likely make it a little more prone to sticking.
good luck! (and learn to use parchement paper or foil on your sheets! ;)
--
May no harm befall you,
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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