How to adjust steel linked watch band (Wenger Swiss Military waterproof)

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Hi Rusty,
How can you still consider it well made , when you already had to spent 1100$ on repairs? At this rate I would put the money aside and buy an new one instead of trying to make it 'last forever'.
Michael, who (for already quite some time) uses a 230$ Seiko when diving... (OK, I bought it duty free)
--
Michael Wolf

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Cthulhu For President.
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Michael Wolf wrote:

This is a good point. I'm not so sure anymore about Rolex. Certainly I'd never buy another one nor recommend it. But, I'm already sunk in the Rolex mud, so to speak.
Amortized, it's been about $100 a year for maintenance for this Rolex watch. Of course, that might not be a representative number (I have no idea). I wonder what other people pay in "typical" Rolex maintenance.
Certainly I had gone in on the watch with the assumption of it lasting forever with little to no maintenance; and just as certainly, I've had over $100 a year in unexpected maintenance & repair costs ... yet I wonder what OTHER people experience.
Maybe my experience is atypical. I don't know.
At the moment, my main problem is assessing whether its worth fixing. One thing I may do is buy the tools to open it up and to remove the band. Once I open it up the right way (I don't want to hack it again), I might see what's broken inside.
BTW, after shaking it violently yesterday, it worked for about 12 hours then stopped again. I suspect an attachment point broke but I won't know until I open it up again. Sure I can stop at a jeweler to ask him to open it but I don't mind buying the tools if I can get them at a reasonable price.
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Speaking or wrist watches, what do others consider to be features of the "perfect" watch? Here's my personal criteria:
Light weight- I don't prefer a heavy watch Rugged case and band- I wear mine 24/7 Metallic Link band- easy on and off, no water problems like leather Sapphire crystal for scratch resistance Analog- I'm old and I have to think too much to use digital time Day, Date- (see above- grin) Quartz crystal accuracy- even a cheap quartz watch is more accurate than most mechanical Self energizing- no batteries to fool with Water resistant to at least 100'- if it's lower than that and I'm attached, it doesn't matter. This covers the pool, spa and shower, for me. Visible all night long without pressing any button
What this all boils down to is my Seiko Kinetic Titanium watch with the Illuminator face. Being Titanium, the watch and band are rugged, light and easy to take off or put on. The analog watch is driven by a Quartz movement for accuracy, and the charge is maintained by an actual generator in the watch- like a perpetual mechanical watch. The entire face is lighted all night, with the hands visible by the backlighting. The watch was $450 in the late 90's and is now about $300 in St. Maarten or St. Thomas.
The drawback to this is that it's not a showy watch, but at least the Titanium case and band have some gold plated areas that look great. I got mine about 1997 or so, as I recall, and it has been working great ever since.
Nobody
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I dont bother with them anymore, I get the time from the cellphone in the rare situation where I care about the time.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

FWIW, I have a Tag 2000 automatic, and I have averaged about $20 per year for the past 14 years on maintenance.(not counting broken and/or melted crystals, which are certainly not the watches fault)
But I don't take it diving...
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"Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions"
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: > Michael Wolf wrote: > >>How can you still consider it well made when you already had to spent >>1100$ on repairs? > > > This is a good point. I'm not so sure anymore about Rolex. > Certainly I'd never buy another one nor recommend it. > But, I'm already sunk in the Rolex mud, so to speak. > > Amortized, it's been about $100 a year for maintenance for this Rolex > watch. > Of course, that might not be a representative number (I have no idea). > I wonder what other people pay in "typical" Rolex maintenance. FWIW, I have a Tag 2000 automatic, and I have averaged about $20 per year for the past 14 years on maintenance.(not counting broken and/or melted crystals, which are certainly not the watches fault) But I don't take it diving...
I'm afraid to ask - how do you "melt" a crystal.
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plexiglass: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plexiglass and many others you can find with google
sapphire crystal: look for thread "sapphire glass types" April 11-14, 2005
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c snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

--

"Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions"
G.K. Chesterton
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Alan Street wrote:

Casting aluminum and Iron.
If you forget to take them off, you can sometimes crack them from spatter when welding without gloves.
Breaking them from imapacts while wearing your watch on your wrist is more painful, however, and the effects are probably longer lasting.
Suprisingly, they resist a grinding wheel quite well.
YMMV
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"Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions"
G.K. Chesterton
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On 18 Jul 2005 13:34:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

'D', which have surrated jaws. As long as you can clamp the watch down somehow and push down real hard on the back as you turn it, that will open most Rolex cases. Problem is, if the back is very tight, it *can* slip and damage the back. Some of the other cheaper Jaxa-like sets may be ok too for a one off job, but it's a trial and error.
The proper opener should be a round ring which fits the back perfectly. On this page you can find some Rolex case tools.
http://www.ofrei.com/page557.html
As you'll see they are not exactly cheap. One could almost buy a quarter of a Rolex for the best priced one. ;-)

to most watchmakers to even contemplate touching their watches. Mind you, dropped watches are not really an indication of a quality problem. Rest assured you have a fine watch there. What should be remembered is that most customers will only have their watches serviced when they stop. This could be as much as 10-15 years intervals and frankly in that time you've spent how much on servicing your car, which sits in the parking lot 70% of it's life ? :) Every 5 years, folks. Oils *are* oils.
ps: Hope this x-post is not ticking people off at rec.scuba, m.c.f and a.h.r. If so, <points finger> he started it, go get him ! ;-)
--

Regards, Frank


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Frank Adam wrote:

Yes. That Rolex is absolutely BEAUTIFUL INSIDE (from a metalworking standpoint)!
When I first bought this used Rolex, it didn't keep good time (losing perhaps a minute a day). I opened the back simply by using a small flathead screwdriver in the notches, twisting out the normal way. I was AMAZED at how BEAUTIFUL it was inside! Honed out of a single block of stainless steel & gold, it seemed. There was a fine gold coiled spring, with a big counterweight, and what looked like a solid silver backplate, and a red stone in the middle of the spring and a very easy to adjust adjustment lever with a few alignment marks on that spring. The entire inside was an absolutely beautiful sight. I adjusted it for a few weeks until I got it down to a loss of about 20 seconds a day but I never did get the timing exact. (Maybe there are other not-so-obvious adjustments?)
I closed it up each day as tightly as that screwdriver would allow me to.
Then one summer, I went swimming in a volcano in Greece (Thira) and the sulphur got inside somehow and gummed it all up. That's when I had the $800 repair. I haven't opened it since then because I'm told it's been sealed with Argon gas. Is that true?
My point is, the case can be opened with a screwdriver but I prefer to use the correct tool (so I'll check out the wonderful link you provided above); but I'm asking an ancilliary question of alt.horology ... which is...
Once opened ... Q: Does the Rolex need to be sealed in a special gas environment?
P.S. Removed scuba as this no longer applies to scuba diving ...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You're not going to open a properly pressure sealed watch with a screwdriver unless you have super human powers. Is your real name Clark Kent?
I was

Really? Beautiful? Rolex finish is workman like but nothing more. Looks like crap compared to this.
http://www.tp178.com/mh/union_panorama/index.html
Honed out of a single block of

Where was the gold? Looks like rhodium plated brass to me.
There was a fine gold coiled spring,

Sounds like a fake Rolex. There's no regulator lever on a datejust movement! You got taken 3 times over!
Or
YOU'RE A TROLL1111111
Richard "TROLL! TROLL! RUN AWAY! TROLL! TROLL!!!" F
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Hi Moka Java,
I looked you up and you appear to be legitimate based on your posts so I will take the time to courteously answer your questions and observations.

I don't know about that gold. I am quoting from my memory from many years ago, probably more than a decade, give or take a few years. I just remember it being very solid looking and very well machined out of a single block as far as I could tell.

Huh? I'm pretty sure it's not fake as it was sold by a jeweler (although not an "official Rolex jeweler") but a jeweler nonetheless who'd be out of business the first fake Rolex he got caught selling. Plus it was in for repairs twice and you'd think _those_ official Rolex jewelers would have mentioned something. And, there's that pawn shop in Texas (admittedly not a reliable source based on the price he quoted of about $500 which can only be for a stolen Rolex - certainly not for a fake, I would think).
Again, I'm quoting all of this from memory, but, interestingly, the Rolex spring adjust didn't seem very much different than that which you pointed us to at http://www.tp178.com/mh/union_panorama/index.html
Specifically, the lever looked very much like the adjustment in the photo
http://www.tp178.com/mh/union_panorama/bilder/union_pano_geh01_txt.jpg
Are you saying this kind of lever is NOT in a Rolex Oyster Perpetual Datejust of probably '70s vintage (I have a separate thread on the year of manufacture).
RD
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On 18 Jul 2005 16:31:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

unable to open it so I brought it home. That evening, I ran a bead of silicone caulking around, inside the rim of a 2" pulley. Next morning I used this "gripper" to unscrew the cover, after which I went back and showed the watchmaker how I had done it and explained that I had probably succeeded because it was my watch and I didn't have to worry about explaining to a customer how I had messed up his antique watch. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 01:12:38 -0400, Gerald Miller

purpose, made from rubber. You simply used your brain, i'll withhold any kudos for that watchmaker though.
ps: My old boss used to open them getting the grip with fine emery paper. By the time i've become an apprentice he caught on, that one can use any soft sheet of thin rubber and a suitable die from a glass press(for the uninitiated, this looks like one half of a pulley).
--

Regards, Frank


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On 18 Jul 2005 16:31:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Rolex Oyster with a "small" screwdriver. You could probably chisel it open but the damage to the case back would be severe.

--

Regards, Frank


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Frank Adam wrote:

Hi Frank,
I looked up your posts and you're a legit guy so I respect your advice.
I'm glad you've said the Rolex isn't filled with an inert gas as I always wondered about that particular detail.
The funny thing is, and this is wierd, I pulled the watch out of the drawer this morning because I wanted to find the serial number and then I shook it feverishly to wind it up and then banged it a few times against the bedpost (pretty hard, with about the force we throw a baseball into a mitt) and lo and behold ... that old Rolex started ticking again!
Sweet! That barely audible fast-paced tickit tickit tickit tickit sound I haven't heard in years! Within a minute, it stopped once and I banged it again. That sweetly revived Rolex has been ticking for about 6 hours now without stopping (I'm wearing it on my wrist right now, to keep it wound).
The only problem is my wrist must've grown in the intervening years as the band is a bit too tight nowadays. I remember having links removed years ago so I will try to dig them up as I'm pretty sure the jeweler gave them back to me (they are partially gold, after all). I hope I saved them in the original box which, since I moved a few times, is buried somewhere in my old stuff in the basement.
Thanks for your advice. I moved the main questions about the serial number over to a separate thread as this really has nothing to do with adjusting the band on a Swiss watch (although the gold-plated silver face does say "T Swiss Made T", whatever those "t's" mean.
RD
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"whatever those "t's" mean."
Those Ts simply refer to the luminous substance used in the watch to make the hands and dots "glow in the dark". I believe the Ts stand for Tritium, the amount of Tritium used is above a certain industry established limit for this slightly radioactive substance. Sort of like a "warning label". Ts are used on other watch, also.
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Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, the one after deuterium.
Unlikely that thats in a watch to make the hands glow.

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"Unlikely that thats in a watch to make the hands glow"
Then what substance is in "Tritium tubes" that make several makes of watches hands glow ????
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