How hard is it to change a fridge compressor?

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Any special tools? Do they come sealed with freon inside or something? Compression fitting or what? Fridge is 3-5 years old, stainless steel Kitchenaid Superba.
Thanks,
Dean
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training, experence, and licenses are required. Then comes the $2500-5000 bucks your going to lay out for tools.
Call a pro and consider it might be time to think about a new one. Some are not worth fixing
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evacuate the old compressor and charge the new one (they don't come pre charged). You also need some special refrigerant lubricant. The fittings can be gotten at any good appliance parts store. As to what fittings you need, look at how the current compressor is installed, and look at what the new compressor requires. You can figure from that out what fittings you'll need. There can (rarely) possibly be some soldering involved. There's also some technique involved in charging up the new compressor (must be done slowly).
It's really not cost effective for the do it yourselfer, unless you can rent the equipment cheap.
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That unit should have a minimum of 5 year warranty on the compressor-possibly even 10. Some warranties cover parts and labor on the "sealed system"(any of the system that holds refrigerant), some cover parts only. Have you checked into that? If it is only 3 or 4 years into a 5 yr warranty, they should be able to go by the serial number if you are not the original purchaser, or have no paperwork. Good luck Larry
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Ok thanks all, I won't try it myself then, given your input. Will look into the warrantee though.
Cheers,
Dean
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In Wisconsin you would need to be certified to even buy refrigerant. The list of what you would have to do is just to long, If it is not under warranty Call a professional, Even if you are mechanically inclined it would probably be over youre head.
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All of USA, need a license.
I've changed compressors in refrigators, takes about three to four hours, and several hundred dollars in equipment and tooling.
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lp13-30 wrote:

That worked for me once. There was a sticker with the manufacture date and it failed within 5 years. I got a new compressor installed for free with no paperwork.
Best regards, Bob
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If it is 3 to 5 years old, it may be under warranty.
Are you sure it is the compressor? There are many things that can go wrong and will seem like the compressor is the problem, but it may not be.
It is not a DIY job though. Refrigeration takes specialized tools and a license to handle the refrigerant.
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You're right it may be the relay or starter. This is what happens: I hear the relay click, the compressor does not start. After 10 secs, the relay clicks off, presumably its getting hot trying. After a minute, same thing, over and over again. If I knock the compressor (which may jiggle the relay I guess), the thing sometimes starts. At that point I let it go as long as it can until my groceries are cold, and try not to open it too much!
Anyone think it could be the starter and relay? When the compressor runs, its sounds smooth and quiet.
Thanks!
Dean
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Last customer I talked with says Sears gets about $170 to install a hard start kit on the compressor. I'm a bit cheaper at $130.
Yep, that sure sounds like the solution.
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{All of USA, need a license.} That is what I assumed although can yo not by 134a from auto stores with out certification except fo California and Wisconsin? I dont know for sure. Guess I could goolgl it
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Don't know about any other states, but in Texas anyone can buy 134A. They even have it at WalMart. Larry
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On Monday, September 12, 2005 10:30:10 AM UTC-4, dean wrote:

Your symptoms sound identical to mine. I bought a start cap and relay and installed it. I applaud the other poster for getting it done in 15 minutes . It took me considerably longer. Even though I bought the correct OEM pa rt from Sears it didn't quite fit without a little kludging. But it still works 3 years later. Can't remember what it cost, but it was way cheaper t han a service call.
Some of my friends speculated it may have failed because I didn't clean the coils enough. I dunno. This refrigerator is designed to make it difficul t, two A coils lined up to make a W, so there's no way to reach the inner o nes.
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On 1/27/2014 7:58 AM, TimR wrote:

Really, that's all it took to do the actual replacement. Researching and diagnosing the problem took me a bit longer<g>
As it was a one size fits all, it was simply a case of following the schematic, clipping some wires and reattaching same with compression terminals(?)
Then, too, the junction box was mounted on the side of the compressor and the only impediment to reaching it was the back cover at the bottom of the refrigerator. Imagine that... something that was actually easy to service<g>
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Hey, it may be a few years later, but glad it worked.
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I've had to leave a faucet drip, it's been below 10 F in NY state, last several days. And windy. Tonight we have a wind chill advisory. Wind chill -25F or colder, and exposed skin can frostbite in half hour or less. I believe it.
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Yes, most heating pads are only a couple hundred watts. Since the end of the cord is in the water, I'd advise an outdoor cord, though.
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replying to dean, Marat wrote:

Thats How Its Done

http://youtu.be/bkmLGbMjnAU

http://youtu.be/bkmLGbMjnAU

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On 1/25/2014 2:44 PM, Marat wrote:

As I can't see Dean's original post, I'm wondering if this is yet another googlef*ck with a post from 8 years ago<g>
That said, are you sure the compressor is shot? Had a four year old Frigidaire go south on me, bought SWMBO a nice French door with lower freezer that she'd been lusting after. While awaiting delivery of the new unit, got to playing around since... nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Turned out that it was a starting capacitor unit. Stopped at the local appliance store, told the guy what I needed and he said "all you need is this handy dandy universal kit for $19.95. No need to go out and try to hunt down a OEM replacement part for three times the price."
$20 and about 15 minutes of my time and we have a spare refrigerator in the garage that works like new.
Easy way to tell. If the unit attempts to start and just hums, spend the $20 and you may have solved the problem. Even if it doesn't work, the attempt will cost you less than a service call.
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