Household goods affordability

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On 10/15/2013 12:20 AM, nestork wrote:

Actually the Maytag appliance brand is are now owned by Whirlpool - the old Maytag doesn't exist in any real sense as most (all?) current products are Whirlpool-designed and mostly made offshore. Assuming that both are today in good functional condition, I'd rather have a 20 year old Maytag product than a new one, as I'd expect the latter to have a longer remaining service life.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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On 10/15/2013 9:53 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

offshore. The controls for high efficiency models are more complex, more water valves as it can fill in five different places.
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On 10/15/2013 12:20 AM, nestork wrote:

We bought a Maytag when we got married 47 years ago Bought a new one last week. No comparison there either. Much different technology, but cheaper in the hours worked from what I recall of prices..
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The $60 microwave oven made me a "chef"! : )
What would you have paid for one in 1960?
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On 10/15/2013 7:07 PM, Bill wrote:

In 1960, the wife stayed home with Wallace and Theodour. She had black and white TV. After her morning dexedrine, she had plenty of energy to do her chores, and cook on the range. Dad came home in the 8 cylinder Buick, using ethyl gas, played with the boys for a while, and went to the den to smoke his pipe. They would have paid about $19.95 for a microwave, which would have lasted 20 years. And comes in avocado green.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/15/13 7:27 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Close but no cigar.
Quote:
Raytheon licensed its technology to the Tappan Stove company. Tappan introduced a large 220-volt wall unit as a home microwave oven in 1955. It sold for $1,295 (figure $10,500 today).
From http://tinyurl.com/jw9fkpc
The article was written in October 2010.
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 19:47:58 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Wwwooooosssshhhh!!!!!
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On 10/15/2013 7:47 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

"Hand Crafted Zenith TV Sets" were very expensive at the time too. Mass production has brought the price of many items down. The price of anything that the government screws with too much skyrockets. I imagine that if government wonks decided that microwave ovens must have absolutely perfect shielding and safety, the price of microwave ovens would be priced in the thousands of dollars. o_O
TDD
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 20:27:19 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Percy Spencer discovered the heating effect of microwaves in 1945.
The first Raytheon commercial microwave oven was the 1161 Radarange, which was marketed in 1954. Rated at 1600 watts, it was so large and expensive that it was practical only for restaurant and institutional use.
In 1947, the first commercial microwave oven hit the market. These primitive units where gigantic and enormously expensive, standing 5 1/2 feet tall, weighing over 750 pounds, and costing about $5000 each.($52,273 in today's dollars) The magnetron tube had to be water-cooled, so plumbing installations were also required.
By the early 1950s, domestic appliance makers began showing interest in the microwave. Lacking the distribution and marketing infrastructure to promote and sell the product on its own, Raytheon entered into a licensing agreement with Tappan Stove Company in 1952. In 1955, Tappan introduced the first domestic microwave oven, which featured a more compact but less powerful microwave generating system. With a price tag of approximately $1,300, these domestic models fared only modestly.
In 1967, Amana, a division of Raytheon, introduced its domestic Radarange microwave oven, marking the beginning of the use of microwave ovens in home kitchens. Although sales were slow during the first few years, partially due to the oven’s relatively expensive price tag, the concept of quick microwave cooking had arrived. In succeeding years, Litton and a number of other companies joined the countertop microwave oven market. By the end of 1971, the price of countertop units began to decrease and their capabilities were expanded
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 20:50:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A prof told us the USN RADAR operators would warm their hands in front of the antennas in WWII.
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On 10/15/2013 8:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

A Vietnam vet who operated a radar unit told me he would aim it at the passing Gooks to sterilize them. Back in the 80's when I was out in the Pacific at the missile range, there are some very powerful radar units out there and when a Russian trawler got too close, the operators would aim the big radar dish at the snooping ship and they would quickly come about and take of at flank speed with smoke coming out of a few places on the little ship. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 20:50:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I was just getting out of college in 1972 and setting up my first real "place of my own". As a bachelor chef, one of the first items on my list was a microwave oven. Unlike most of my cars, it's not something I "wish I still had" but I sure enjoyed using it and quite honestly there isn't more then a dimes worth of functional difference between the one I had in 1972 and the one I have today other then increased power and a revolving turntable.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

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On 10/15/2013 7:07 PM, Bill wrote:

Don't know but I think it was $150 when we married in 1966. more than a week's pay at the time about $125 a week. This one was $950, less than a week's pay. I could have bought one today for abou two days wages. http://www.gti.net/mocolib1/prices/1960.html
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 06:20:44 +0200, nestork

I suppose there's some truth to that but if you want to compare you need some basis of comparison. Dollars or hours are about all I can think of. I sort of like hours better because it makes it somewhat closer to a work = get stuff equation. If the average weekly income in 1940 (for 60 hours of work) was $50 it would still make a big difference if that $50 was earned with 40 hours of work or with 60 hours of work. So if you looked at 1940 versus 2000 and said the average weekly income in 1940 was $50 and in 2000 its $500 it looks like people make 10 times as much for a weeks worth of work. But if you covert it to dollars per hour labor equivalent than 1940 is $0.83/hr and 2000 is $12.50/hr and the ratio is not 10:1 it's 30:1. It's not nearly as important as "what is cost in dollars" but "what it cost in your labor/time". Another way to look at this is the old joke about how if Bill Gate's drops a hundred dollar bill on the sidewalk when getting out of a taxi it's not worth his time to stop and pick it up, his time is too valuable. Now for a single instance that's obviously silly, but what if the comparison was - should Bill Gates spend all day picking up $10,000 dollars in $100 bills that fell out of his suitcase or should he let it go and proceed to his meeting in the penthouse to seal some deal. Clearly for Bill he should just hope on the Elevator. If that happened to me... I'd be on my hands and knees scooping up the money, my "important meeting" of the dust bunny club could wait.
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Bingo. Mc Cain's my senator. I've been to his "town halls". Just like the letters he sends to reply to contact emails, all his town halls amount to are him telling you why you are wrong and he's right. And that's if you can actually get him to establish his position on something instead of pandering to both sides of the fence.
the only people they represent are the people who bribe them with large amounts of cash.
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Right, and you can't count them one more time to check the results because that would be racist.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz:

That is *exactly* where I was going with it.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 10/13/2013 6:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The ultimate consequence of Affirmative Action is sitting in The White House. o_O
TDD
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 19:52:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

zING!!!!
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