Home Gas Pressure


I have a gas outdoor grill hooked to my home gas line here in Southern California.
This winter my grill is not heating near enough. I can cook on it but takes some time.
I took out the lava bricks and cleaned everything up. Burner is fine and all holes open. Flame comes out even but low.
Years back I did put in new valves as its a Sears and easy to get parts and install, but have been holding off.
Seems that this has occurred since the gas company came along and installed a new meter to replace the original one some 45 years old. So I am wondering if this new meter has a lower flow rate.
I have two gas furnaces, upstairs and downstairs and gas water heater and they function fine.
Also, I cook in evening at sundown just went gas use would be high with everyone's cooking and furnaces kicking in.
So I was holding off doing an overhaul to see if this gets better in summer.
Any one have an opinion about the new meter having a lower flow rate???????
Or if I overhaul should I put in different gas jets to get better flow?
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Bob wrote:

I am going to assume that it once worked OK and nothing was done that would change that. Remember that propane and NG require different parts and if you have the wrong parts (I can't remember which way) it could cause this problem.
You may want to take a careful look at all the tubes where air or gas or both pass. Some spiders just love to make their homes in there and can block things up. It is not good for the spiders either. I have head of some sort of prevention, (stainless steel wool?)
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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<snip>
Probably not.

No. Or maybe. Call your gas supplier. The technician can likely give you a helpful opinion on modifying the grill.The big clue is the low flame, indicating that the normal flow is compromised by either low pressure (adjustable at the meter) or an undersized or otherwise faulty gas line. A malfunctioning shutoff valve could cripple flow, for example. One common diagnostic technique is the familiar 'substitute known good part' that you see in every auto repair manual. Borrow a good grill from a friend and try it out - the results will be very informative. HTH
Joe
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In my area, spiders somehow manage to plug the gas orifices in my outdoor grill with their web material. The low flame creates the impression of low gas pressure, but the real issue is actually an obstruction. In my grill, the solution is to take apart the jets and clean the orifices with a toothpick.
Smarty
wrote:

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