Help installing new bath spout copper tube from wall cut too short!

I replaced a bath tub spout with a Danco spout made to replace the old Moen spout.
I made a big mistake by cutting the 1/2" copper nub coming out of the wall to less than the minimum called for. The minimum length of the copper tube distance from the wall was 1.5", I cut it to 1". This resulted in water coming out of the back of the spout when I use the shower diverter on the spout.
As I see it I now have two options to fix the problem
1 to remove tile and cut through the backer board remove and replace the copper nub by soldering a longer copper tube to replace the shorter one
2 cut out a piece of plasterboard behind the plumbing to gain access to the back of the plumbing and remove and resolder a longer copper pipe
My questions:
What's the easier option 1 or 2 ??
Am I missing another option that would be simpler?? (NOTE I can't solder a coupling and a copper tube section to extend the copper tube from the wall as the coupling would interfere with the spout installation, not making it flush to the tile) Thanks for your help!
Vic
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I may be way out in left field here, but is there a butt joint for copper that will fit INSIDE the pipe?
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Noozer wrote:

I've not seen one, but if the OP can stand waiting a week or so and will cover the postage (which just went up again today BTW) I'd be happy to turn one out of a bit of scrap brass for him if he emails me about it.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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There is a commercially made coupling that fits inside of 1/2" copper tube. You will not find it at most big box stores, probably at a plumbing supply house, they are hard to find. I had used one in the past but cannot remember where I got it.
You may be able to locate some 1/2" outside diameter copper tube that will just fit inside a 1/2 inside diameter copper plumbing pipe. A little soldering and you are back in business without tearing apart any walls.

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I think we really need a pic here. Would it be possible to desolder something and put in a slightly longer pipe?
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vic wrote:

Another thought...If the spout firmly attaches to the remaining stub, but leaks because the stub doesen't go far enough into it to connect with some seal ring.....Then, maybe you could use some silicone caulk liberally applied in the right place to seal the stub to the inside of the spout. The water pressures there aren't all that high, y'know.
If you go that route, give the caulk overnight to set before succumbing to the temptation to test it.
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Of those two options if the backside wall is just wallboard and paint (as in not papered or other surface) that is far simpler than the tile route most likely. OTOH, _IF_ (the big if :) ) you can remove the existing tile w/o breaking it, you could reuse it and there would be no noticeable repair area if you're very careful about cleaning up and realigning everything when you put it back.
Other than the slip coupling no great ideas other than what is suppose to be on the end of the copper to mate? Not seen a spout that would expect just a stub piece of 1/2" copper as the mating surface against the inner gasket as that is a sharp and very narrow/thin edge which doesn't make much of a seal endwise -- or is there an o-ring around the outer diameter on the inside of the spout that's the seal? That seems pretty minimal seal for the water pressure when the diverter valve is closed, though...can't envision the connection to know what would be a workaround...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (vic) writes: | I replaced a bath tub spout with a Danco spout made to replace the old | Moen spout. | | I made a big mistake by cutting the 1/2" copper nub coming out of the | wall to less than the minimum called for. The minimum length of the | copper tube distance from the wall was 1.5", I cut it to 1". This | resulted in water coming out of the back of the spout when I use the | shower diverter on the spout. | | As I see it I now have two options to fix the problem | | 1 to remove tile and cut through the backer board remove and replace | the copper nub by soldering a longer copper tube to replace the | shorter one | | 2 cut out a piece of plasterboard behind the plumbing to gain access | to the back of the plumbing and remove and resolder a longer copper | pipe | | My questions: | | What's the easier option 1 or 2 ?? | | Am I missing another option that would be simpler?? (NOTE I can't | solder a coupling and a copper tube section to extend the copper tube | from the wall as the coupling would interfere with the spout | installation, not making it flush to the tile)
You could get the other style of spout that connects to 1/2" MIP rather than to a bare stub (nub). This connection is usually at the far (from the wall) end of the spout leaving you plenty of room for a solder (or even compression) coupling near the wall.
Also, are you sure the stub is soldered into something behind the wall? Often there is a threaded elbow there.
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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