Have you had to replace your fuel pump?

Page 5 of 6  
wrote:

floormats, and the seats are like new. If someone had cranked the ODO bact to 37000, it would be believeable - and it is on it's second set of tires, and original rear brakes and exhaust. Original starter and alternator as well.
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On 10/11/2012 3:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

One (10+ yr-old vehicle) out of total of some 10-12 vehicles in last 20+ years...iow, your "statistics" are terribly skewed...
As for the other rant on vehicles not lasting as long as days of yore, that's just convenient-remembering, too. As is the nonsense that fuel-injected engines don't outperform old normally aspirated...
There is a lot of extraneous "stuff" as far as gew-gaws that aren't all that necessary, granted, but it is what is demanded by the bulk of the market, not the other way 'round...
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On 10/11/2012 7:44 AM, dpb wrote:

Government mandated tree huger friendly fuel adulterated with ethanol is tearing up engines and fuel systems which were really designed for REAL gasoline. O_o
TDD
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On 10/11/2012 7:51 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote: ...

See no real signs of that here...E-10 has been around since the 80's--that's 30 yr which covers the time frame above...only thing I do see is that there's the mileage penalty owing to lower specific energy content...
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I dropped about 10% mileage when they went to E10. Might just have well pumped the gas full of air.
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On 10/11/2012 6:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Well, not really...despite the lower Btu rating, the ethanol does raise octane rating and aids in meeting emission limits. If weren't using it, the cost to meet octane needs and emission standards would mean CA summer-gas-like prices through rest of US and more like what they're now experiencing w/ the present supply disruptions there...
It's cheaper than the alternative additives to meet the same requirements (which is why refiners are and have been using well over the minimum amounts that would meet the mandatory use levels.
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On 10/11/2012 7:10 PM, dpb wrote: ...

Oh, and if the vehicle is properly tuned, you really shouldn't see more than about a 5-6% drop in mileage based on the relative energy densities of an average gasoline blend and E10...
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"well tuned" LOL!
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On 10/11/2012 9:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

The 'puter should do it...blame the programmer!!! :)
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Got me thinking. Maybe there is a market for a hippie retro car.... I mean they do buy VW beetles that are tiny, cramped little wonders that cost $20K, when they could have a real car. So, how about a car styled like a 60s car, with very limited features? They could probably figure out a way to have it get 12mpg too.
As for the fuel pump issue, the last fuel pump I replaced was back in 1978 in a Fiat 124 Spyder that was just two years old. Not example a fair example of the good old days though, because Fiats were real crappers.
I do concur with some of the OP's points, eg having to buy a special tool to remove spark plugs. I was recently working on a BMW and they have a penchant for using a different style frigging electrical connector on various cables, even those going to the same componet. And that wouldn't be so much of a problem, if the connectors could make it obvious what you have to do to get them apart. I've seen a lot of connectors in a long career, but I've never seen so many where even looking at it in broad daylight you can't figure out how it's supposed to come apart. Good luck with the ones you can barely get to.
The same BMW requires a 27mm socket to remove the oil filter. At least that's still a std tool, but why couldn't it be a smaller size that you're likely to have in a std socket set?
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My sister's Ford Taurus had to have it's in tank fuel pump replaced 3 times.
The service manager at that dealership told me that the reason why the pump was in the fuel tank was because it was extremely rare for one of them to go.
I told him that I didn't believe that these pumps were reliable and than my sister just happened to have bad luck. But I told him how Ford could fix the problem. My Toyota Corolla also had an in tank fuel pump, but it also had a removable cover in the trunk that provided access to the fuel pump so that the work involved in replacing the pump was dramatically reduced.
The real problem here is that major auto companies want to support their dealerships by ensuring enough things go wrong with enough cars that their mechanics are busy. Electric motors are extremely reliable, and once electric cars become more affordable and more widely accepted, you can count on defects being built into them as well to keep the mechanics in the dealerships busy.
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nestork


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Exactly right. Those who complain about one "luxury" accessory will swear by their electric operated side view mirrors. Fuel pumps are pure luck. I've replaced them once each in 3 of the last 5 of my daily drivers over the past 20 years.. All high millage Chevys and one Grand Am. No rhyme or reason I can see except initial pump quality. Just a month ago I replaced the rusty gas tank in my '97 Lumina. A lot of labor just replacing the tank. Took me and my son about 5 hours, working on the floor at a steady, careful pace. I was just handing him tools. That new tank cost $98. We moved the old pump to the new tank, just replacing the strainer sock. That pump has about 172k miles. Didn't want to spend +$200 on a pump that might outlive the car. An access panel to the pump is a good idea, but most car designers don't see it that way. New cars are leagues better than old ones, and that pump in the tank is maybe the biggest weak spot in terms of maintenance cost. I had the fuel pump fail on my '66 F-100 352ci in the middle of an intersection way back, and there was a nearby parts store. Took me 5 minutes to put the new pump in and get going again. Now you need a tow.
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On 10/11/2012 2:46 PM, Vic Smith wrote: ...

The problem in general is there's almost always something else in the way in a modern vehicle where stuff is so cramped...the stinkin' LeSabre (and I'm sure a lot of others) had the battery under the rear seat cushion for pete's sake!!! Pita to drag that big ol' thing outta' there to get to that on a cold, rainy day in the hospital parking lot... :(
Did the tank in the '98 Chebby 4x4 not long ago 'cuz the purge valve failed and the pump sucked it in and collapsed it. It wasn't too bad 'cuz can get under it w/o too much trouble. The biggest pita on it actually was the gas line disconnects at the tank--they're a springloaded fitting on a cast plastic fitting on the top of the fuel pump. There's a little specialty "tool" that's supposed to release the three fingers and let slide off but getting it in there and getting them to release under the truck w/ the restricted access and no leverage is not any fun at all. I'd gladly have the old line fittings w/ a tubing wrench...I was tempted to chop 'em off and replace w/ just a hose clamp but finally did manage it...
3rd party replacement tank was about $115 while The General wanted $1100 for the OEM tank alone...don't recall the fuel pump--think even the Delco there is only $200 online. The PU could have access thru the bed except there's a 150 gal diesel tank sitting where it would have to be and it was more trouble to move it than crawl under...
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I was pro-active on that one. I took my car to the battery store when it was over five years old and cold weather was coming. I have no idea how much longer it was going to last, but it did not let me down but I figured it would in the winter. Second battery was still working when I got rid of the car.
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Volkswagen and Audi have had them back there for decades. Remember my 1949 VW. On the 1928 Chevy it was under the floorboards. Same on the 65 Chevy Van.

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On 10/11/2012 10:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

The '28 Chevy (truck) didn't have a battery from factory--granddad did add starter by the time I was beginning to drive--it's actually what learned on. The gas tank was the seat structure w/ just a pad on top and a rear backrest; I can't think where the battery was actually mounted altho it may have been under the floorboard. I'm still mad at Dad for having sold it while brother and I were off at uni and he's been gone over 10 yr now... :)
The Chevy trucks were under driver's side floorboard (as was the brake master cylinder as well) at least thru early 50s.
The battery on the Chrysler 300M was hidden in front of the right front wheel behind an access panel in the front inner fender. By service manual required removing wheel altho I managed w/o. _NOT_ a good design decision, either. We're on several miles of dirt road and that was the absolute worst "mudding" vehicle I've ever tried to get to/from town with after a rain...it was a great interstate long distance vehicle that I got for the transition period from E TN to W KS and served that purpose well for the time were still making very frequent trips back and forth. But, it couldn't live up to being a farm car even as a second vehicle so is now an Enclave w/ the AWD and much higher road clearance. Unfortunately, it's hardly rained since got it so haven't had much opportunity to really test its mettle... :(
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Vic Smith;2942073 Wrote: > An access panel to the pump is a good idea, but most car designers don't > see it that way.
Which begs the blindingly obvious question...
If Toyota engineers thought it was a good idea, and I think it's a good idea, and you think it's a good idea, then why the he11 doesn't Detroit think it's a good idea?
It just seems our society funtions on waste. We intentionally put fuel pumps in gas tanks even though the old mechanical pumps were very reliable and seldom caused any problems. And, we intentionally DON'T make it easy to replace that pump if it does fail. And GM and Ford do that because they think that once the customer has purchased one of their vehicles, he then becomes a cow to be milked regularily.
My Toyota Corolla had an in-tank fuel pump, but there was a panel in the trunk for easy access to that pump. My sister's Ford Taurus had to have it's fuel pump replaced three times and each time the fuel tank had to be dropped cuz there was no removable panel in the trunk. Is there any freaking wonder why more and more people are buying Japanese and South Korean cars?
Someone needs to explain to someone in Washington that you don't become rich by making junk that your dealerships have to repair often. You get rich buy making a quality product that doesn't have to be repaired often, cuz then everyone will want your product, just like most people in the world would prefer a Toyota Corolla or Honda Civic over a Ford or Chevy.
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nestork


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On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 00:18:13 +0000, nestork

They do, but it add $1.25 to the cost of a car so they don't do it.
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Or maybe it adds $1m to their liability premiums, encouraging consumers to mess around with volatile gasoline by providing them ready access.
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 03:31:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

No. I had to replace a fuel tank but the pump was fine.

Do you run the tank empty? Nearly? That's *really* bad for fuel pumps.

Nope. The only fuel pump I've ever replaced was the old style, bolted to the side of the engine.

Do you have emissions inspections in your state?
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