Halogen screw in bulbs - waste of money

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I just looked at some of the screw in halogen bulbs that should fit any fixture made for common indecesant bulbs.
They claim more light for less energy.
When you read the wattage and lumens rating, it's obvious their claim is a lie.
A standard indecesant bulb actually puts out about 1% to 2% MORE lumens than the halogen of the same wattage. And the bulb uses the SAME wattage.
It's something like a 100 watt bulb uses 100 watts whether it's indecesant or halogen. The ind bulb produces somethingh like 1380 lumens, the hal light produces 1365 lumens.
The ind. bulb costs around 50 cents, the halogen bulb costs about $5. SO, what's the point. There is no energy savings at all, 100 watts is 100 watts. And after you pay 10 times as much for the halogen, you actually get 1% or 2% less light. The only advantage I saw was that the halogen is rated to last 1 1/2 times that of an ind. bulb. BIG DEAL..... First of all, those life expectency numbers are always exaggerated anyhow. And you could buy TEN ind. bulbs for the cost of one halogen.
I just dont see the point of these halogens at all, other than to make money for the seller.
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I use the halogen bulbs in fixtures that are difficult to reach, because they last considerably longer than standard bulbs.
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But the quality of the light is great. It's so clean and blue. rps

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On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 06:00:24 -0600, Generic Male Homosapien

[snip]
Eh? I just replaced 6 incandescent kitchen ceiling floods with like-wattage halogens... the improvement in light output is astonishing.
...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, P.E. | mens |
| Analog Innovations, Inc. | et |
  Click to see the full signature.
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the OP has no idea what he's talking about. 11 watt CF bulbs are the equivalent of a 60 watt incandescent, and a 25 watt CF is the equivalent of 100 watts, in lumens, not watts. it still consumes about 25% of the original.
the local IKEA store has a wall where half the wall is made of CF bulbs and the other is made of incandescent bulbs, and there's a watt meter showing each half's consumption. obviously they're not equal.
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Op is comparing incandesant to halogen, not CF. But he is still wrong Halogen are 20 % more efficent. than incandesant. But there are different styles of halogen.
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oh, halogen...
you mean like those Xenon lights on high end cars? the difference in luminosity is very obvious.
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no JJ halogen and zenon gas are different, and HID on cars are a different light altogether. Lights on cars have been standard halogen for years. Think of the little 2" spotlights ,mr16 with a whiter light ,those are halogen, and the burn hot. Most high quality display lighting is halogen. Zenon ,HID on cars is slightly bluer.
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is the only difference between these lights the gas used inside? do all of them have a filament inside (unlike fluorescent) ?
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JJ , im no lighting expert , But Hid have high voltage balasts and systems. Lighting is an ever changing science , technology. More will come ..
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Halogen bulbs are still incandescent. HID are gas discharge lamps (Xenon arc) -- same general principle (I am guessing) as neon advertising signs.
-=- Alan
On 11/07/03 04:03 pm j j put fingers to keyboard and launched the following message into cyberspace:

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Don't forget that, unless you're a jewelry store, lighting usually represents less than 20% of your total electric bill. If you're looking to save energy, invest in replacing the real energy wasters, like old refrigeratiors, unused freezers, dehumidifiers , air-conditioners.
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represents
that's not the only reason to use CF bulbs. My reason is simple: the lamp I have accepts 3 bulbs of maximum 60 watts each and I want more light. 100 watts would be too hot. Another reason is the house wiring is very old and there are many circuits connected to one wire. 300 watts in my lamp is too much draw.
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Sometimes it best to read before posting. The OP was comparing Halogen versus standard bulb. He said nothing about CF bulbs.
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wrote:

Thank you! I thought I clearly specified HALOGEN..... (duh)
Compact florescent is a whole different matter, and yes, those are a great energy saver. My whole house has them, even the garage. I work at night quite a bit, and I am not real good about shutting lights off. I now save nearly $10 a month from what my electric bill used to be.
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Do you?
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"j j" ( snipped-for-privacy@jj.com) writes:

I wondered about that myself. I've had a halogen desk lamp for about ten years, and it's only a 20W bulb. Previously, I had a regular bulb desk lamp there, and I used either a 40 or 60W bulb, yet I get by fine with the 20W halogen.
I like the enough that I've done repair on the thing to keep it running. It was a gift, but don't think it was bottom of the line. Yet, a few years in I had to replace the on-off switch. Then, my fault, I blew the fuse in the transformer, so I had to hack open the AC adaptor and fix that. Luckily there was a fuse in there separate from the transformer, and it got back in working order, though the case of the adaptor is kind of messy. The lamp is a little shaky in design, since it uses the mechanical parts to convey the low voltage to the bulb. I had to manufacture a bit to replace a bit that just wore out, and it was less then perfect. When the replacement wore out too, I just took the mechanical arm out of the picture, and ran wire from the AC adaptor to the socket. It's working better than it has in some years, since the scheme even before I had to replace the part suffered from less than perfect electrical contact between sections of the arm. Now it's nice and steady, and I can see it lasted for a good many years.
If I wasn't getting something out of it, and not only does the light seem good for the wattage but it's a smaller and easier to manipulate the late, I sure wouldn't have bothered with all this to keep it running.
Michael

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I have some 30 watt (or less, could be 28) CF bulbs made by Globo. They are supposed to be the equivalent of 100 watts and they are indeed very bright. They're also very resistant. My dad dropped one while changing it, from around 6 or 7 feet, and the thing still works great, no crack or anything.
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