Goo-Gone substitute(s)

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You've been told more than one time that paint thinner is acceptable, WD40 is acceptable, Lighter Fluid is acceptable, gasoline is acceptable. None of these will hurt, melt, mar, stain, or otherwise harm your plastic case on your computer. Goo Gon is readily available at any grocery store. What do you want from the group, you've turned down every logical suggestion you've been given.
I guess you could try cooking oil. Avoid nail polish remover.
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DanG
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SOME lighter fluids, and Gasoline, will damage most styrene plastics, including ABS.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Incorrect use of the term troll.
And you never mentioned what type of plastic you have.
"Decorative" is not a type of plastic.
A lot of solvents won't destroy plastic. Nylon is another matter.
Acetone, toluene, laquer thinner will tend to melt most plastics, but you will get your label off and the residue from the glue - you might temporarily soften the plastic while doing it, and alter it's finish slightly.
Of those 3, acetone is least likely to harm the plastic in question.
You might also try nitromethane. You can find it at hobby stores - it's the fuel used for model airplanes.
Nitromethane will soften and remove dry superglue (cyanoacrylate) by the way - way better than acetone (or nail polish) will.
You might also try MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) but again, keep the exposure time to the plastic to a minimum.
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those solvents can also cause cracking or "crazing".

risky because of the fumes. it might also be absorbed by the skin,and give headaches,etc.

MEK is nasty on plastics.Risky.
you could also try vegetable oil,WD-40,isopropyl alcohol. Goo-Gone is an orange/citrus oil based product.
BTW,I use charcoal lighter fluid for bug and tar removal on my car. I think it's basically kerosene,or similar to it,but I haven't verified that.
--
Jim Yanik
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wrote:

Much closer to Varsol, actually.
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BINGO! The others *might* work on some plastics but on others they can dissolve the plastic or cause it to haze over. Why don't you simply check with someone who might know, like Rubbermaid. Reading their website a couple of years ago and they put out an FAQ on removing labels from their products (and by implication their competitors). Cooking oil (vegetable, olive, etc) is by far the safest and will eventually work on every adhesive likely to be used to attach labels.

Most vehicles these days have a list of chemicals that can be used on which parts of the car but unfortunately it's usually in the workshop manual and is intended for the body repair section of the dealer. Mine runs a couple of pages and contains such gems as "alcohol should not be used on the bumper bar covers except when completely dried off in a few seconds".
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If he's going out to the store for anything anyway, why not just buy the Goo-Gone or Goof-off in the first place? It won't damage even Styrene plastic, which gasoline, acetone, and laquer thinners will disolve quite quickly.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Paint thinner won't harm most plastics, they even sell it in plastic containers! Gasoline? Maybe on some plastics but not most. I've used lighter fluid to clean greasy buildup on "plexiglass" or something similar. No harm.
Test in an inconspicuous area if possible.
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wrote:

And damages some plastics, which the GooGone does not.
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If the plastic in question is a bucket, bottle, etc., try filling it with very hot water. That may soften the adhesive enough to allow you to peel the label off. Otherwise, careful and gentle heating with a heat gun or hair dryer may do the trick.
Soaking in a solution of washing soda in hot water (about 1 cup per gallon) works sometimes.
Or you could try solvents: mineral spirits or naphtha won't harm most plastics.
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 23:22:05 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

It's decorative trim plastic on a PC. I'm not going to risk trying acetone. I was looking for a more benign substitute.
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Nobody suggested trying acetone.
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Them suggestions be eight. Now, they be nine (benign; say it out loud)
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 23:32:07 +0000 (UTC), Jeff The Drunk

baby oil
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

acetone
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Uno

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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 17:24:25 -0600, Uno wrote:

Ok so in order to remove the label I need to melt it off along with the plastic? No thanks.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Funny. I guess I didn't know your situation. I was using acetone all day removing goo from fixtures, the tub and the sink.
Yeah acetone + plastic = goo.
Cheers,
--
Uno

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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Try WD-40, as Jamesgangnc suggested, or another oily substance, like mineral spirits. Waterless hand cleaner (Goop, Go-Jo) or lanolin should also do the trick. And then there's brake fluid, which can even dissolve paint off styrofoam without harming the styrofoam.
Most plastic cases are made of styrene, ABS, PVC, acrylic, or polycarbonate and are easily dissolved by acetone, lacquer thinner, some enamel thinners (that evaporate quickly and make your skin cold upon contact), carburetor/throttle body cleaner, and PB Blaster. These chemicals are so harmful to those plastics that they're often used for gluing them together.
Some plastics are really good at resisting most solvents: polyethylene (HDPE, LDPE, MDPE, used for translucent and opaque bottles), polypropylene (PP, used for Tupperware, plastic storage boxes), nylon (opaque), acetal (lots of plumbing parts), and PET (clear soda bottles)
Here are some databases for chemical compatibility of many materials. Unfortunately only a few plastics are included:
www.coleparmer.com/techinfo/chemcomp.asp
www.coleparmer.com/techinfo/chemcomp.asp
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Goo-Gone is kerosene. -----
- gpsman
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 17:16:13 -0700 (PDT), gpsman

Definitely not. It is up to 95% Hydrotreated light petroleum distillate (This is a mixture of C10-C14 naphthenes, iso- and n-paraffins. Neither the concentration of aromatics nor of hexane is greater than 0.1 % by volume), ,up to 10% TriPropylene Glycol Methyl Ether, and up to 10% Citrus extracts.
Deodorized Kero, as well as many solvents such as stoddard solvent, fall into the hydrotreated light distilate category
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