GE's Customer Service came through on this one

Not associated with GE, just have quite a few appliances in the kitchen.
Had a problem with an 'out of warrantee' product, posing no danger, just a 'functional' problem. Yet, GE felt responsible enough for the problem they not only sent me a repair free, but hounded me to make sure I received it!
So, with the freedom to complain comes the responsibility to praise: Thank you, GE
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On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 6:39:57 AM UTC-7, Robert Macy wrote:

'functional' problem. Yet, GE felt responsible enough for the problem they not only sent me a repair free, but hounded me to make sure I received it!

I thought GE stopped making household appliances.
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On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 10:10:11 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

'functional' problem. Yet, GE felt responsible enough for the problem they not only sent me a repair free, but hounded me to make sure I received it!

Ford stopped making the 2005 Taurus many years ago, yet I can still get parts from them.
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On 6/26/2013 9:14 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

But you can still buy new GE-branded appliances.
(See above that I'm not positive of pedigree and it's not clear from GE site. I haven't searched thoroughly to find other reports but it does seem to me that at one point they at least talked of divesting the appliance business as well--perhaps that didn't actually happen or it's been re-acquired or it is simply a licensed operation, I'm not sure...but they're still on the market under GE label).
--


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On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 10:46:51 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I know...I was merely (subtly) pointing out that _even if_ GE no longer made household appliances it wouldn't mean that parts for existing units were no longer available.
The comment "I thought GE stopped making household appliances" seemed (at least to me) to imply that the author was surprised that Customer Service and Parts for GE household appliances were still available.
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On 6/26/2013 9:10 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

I'm not absolutely positive how the GE-branded stuff is working these days and couldn't clearly tell from the web site...it's still at the corporate GE site but the appliances themselves have their own--but then again, that wouldn't be surprising. Corporate history page doesn't deal w/ acquisitions/deacquisition/licensing issues re: trademarks, etc., that I could find quickly.
Certainly GE-branded stuff is still out there; just bought new washer/dryer recently...have had good success so far.
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GE is still very much in the major appliance business and has invested in that business over the last couple of years. The headquarters of the business is GE Appliance Park, Louisville, KY. GE is sourcing parts from other countries too. It's hard to know exactly what GE makes because they've sold the rights to put the GE brand on small electrical products of various kinds.
Tomsic
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I think I've been there. It's a 200 acres of grass, bushes, and trees, with triple size kitchen appliances for children to play on.
They have a small amusement park where kids can be tumbled in a 10-times-lifesize clothes dryer, and a water spray in a dish washer the same size.
Plus there's a small zoo, where chimpanzees have been taught to do laundry there are 8 machines,, and one chimp starts a load every 6 minutes.
I love Appliance Park.
Louisville, KY. GE is sourcing parts from

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wrote:

these days

corporate

again, that

that I

invested in

products of

Yeah, my favorite was the 8-ft garbage disposal.
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kitchen.

just a 'functional' problem. Yet, GE felt responsible enough for the problem they not only sent me a repair free, but hounded me to make sure I received it!

I'm glad to hear this. What was the product?
I have a 3-year old GE washer model WWA8829RBLWW that is a piece of crap. It has had a problem draining since it was installed. Customer service are AMERCIANS (gasp!) and extremely good to deal with, but once it's out of warranty (my mistake for waiting) it's cash on the barrel head for a service call or buy parts and start swapping them out to find the problems.
This is one of those "low water" top loaders that spins the clothes at such a super high speed that everything is wrinkled when it's finished, even on the "slow" speeds. It has no agitator because they claim "it doesn't need one!" Bull s***. That's ridiculous. It just sloshes the clothes around in 3-inches of water. It doesn't get the clothes clean.
Another problem is that there is no lint catcher because they claim "lint is ground up and flusheed out with the water." So you have to root out the drain pipe every few months.
When draining, the drain pump goes off and on over at about a 5 second cycle rate. I'm expecting that to fail any time. It pumps out a flowrate greater than called for in the specs and backs up in the standpipe. I know that for a fact because the previous washer was also GE and specs were for the same flowrate. This is fine for newer houses, but too high flow for our old drains.
I ended up having to seal the outlet hose to the standpipe nipple to keep it from backing up and running back down the nipple and leaking into the wall or on the floor. Floor is OK - but running into the wall caused a mold problem that did not surface until weeks later.
Summary -- does not clean, wrinkles clothes, makes a hell of a loud noise spinning, does not meet published specs. But all the overflows help keep the flloor sparkling! LOL!
Executive summary -- Don't buy any washer without an agitator or a high flow drain pump, and return it if it gives any problem the first few months.
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:54:45 -0700, "Guv Bob"

'functional' problem. Yet, GE felt responsible enough for the problem they not only sent me a repair free, but hounded me to make sure I received it!

has had a problem draining since it was installed. Customer service are AMERCIANS (gasp!) and extremely good to deal with, but once it's out of warranty (my mistake for waiting) it's cash on the barrel head for a service call or buy parts and start swapping them out to find the problems.

CAn you stand by the machine and turn it off when you see that not much water is coming out of the hose. I do that, mostly because I'm impatient. The sta-press clothes dries in only about 5 minutes anyhow, and the towels I sometimes take out when they're not dripping wet, but not dry either. and let finish drying on the shower bar.
Everything seems dryer when the clothes are warm. When they cool off sometimes I wish I'd left them in the dryer longer.

need one!" Bull s***. That's ridiculous. It just sloshes the clothes around in 3-inches of water. It doesn't get the clothes clean.
So what kind of repair would help this?
Just guessing that if other people with the same design don't get their clothes clean, you didn't miss much by not complaining on time. What can they do if it's a bad design. To get a refund, you'd have to complain very early.

That's what the owners manual says about my Kenmore Whirlpool too. No lint filter and the claim that it chops the lint up.

Well, I've never had to do that, in the 30 years I've lived here. Yeah, I'm just one person, but that still seems like 7+ years for 4 people. Maybe you use a lot of lint producing clothes? Do sweatsshirts do that?
I've also taken some precautions. I used to use a mesh "sock" that I rubberbanded ove the output hose.. But that got to be a pain in the neck. I do use something I found at a hardware store, a 3 or 4 inch piece of white plastic pipe, with little holes at the bottom and bigger holes as it gets to the top. This catches little lint at the bottom , and as these holes clog up, the water level rises, and it takes bigger lint to clog the top holes. If it overflows the top it just goes down the center, which is unrestricted, but I don't think it's ever done that, and I'm by the washer a lot.
I didn't do this at all for the first 2 or 3 years, but to prevent drain backups because of the overflowing stream behind my house, I put in a checkvalve in the drain. I didn't want line clogging it so I started being careful. Even before I was careful, no clogs.

And it used to stay on all the draining time?

called for in the specs and backs up in the standpipe. I know that for a fact because the previous washer was also GE and specs were for the same flowrate.
Conceivably, t he prev. machine wasn't meeting the spec and this one is. I've never worried about flow rate, but can you make an absolute measur ement. Time how long it takes to fill a gallon bottle, or whatever. And it does this even though the drain pump turns on and off every 5 seconds. If it stayed on, wouldn't it pump even faster? Maybe it has some circuit to turn it off so it doesn't pump too fast. That would mean the cycling is okay.
Maybe it backs-up because your drain is on the verge of being clogged

It's true, I have a "never" house, but maybe there is something sticking out somewhere that the lint sticks on. Is it worth getting a plumber to look in the pipe down near the clog? If you've been paying a rooter every few months, he might do it for free or discount. (Of course finding the cause might cost him your business, so maybe he won't give a discount.)

from backing up and running back down the nipple and leaking into the wall or on the floor.
Oh, no sink. I wish I'd known that when I wrote about the perforated pipe I use.

spinning, does not meet published specs. But all the overflows help keep the flloor sparkling! LOL!

I guess you're right. Except I'd complain even earlier than the first few months and I'd call on a phone that itemizes your phone calls, to prove you called. If you live in a one-party state, I'd record it.
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My guys at the parts house call them "Generally expensive" because repair parts cost more than other brands. Anyone remember the GE football compressors they put in refrigerators? And we all got to take out? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I have a 3-year old GE washer model WWA8829RBLWW that is a piece of crap. It has had a problem draining since it was installed. Customer service are AMERCIANS (gasp!) and extremely good to deal with, but once it's out of warranty (my mistake for waiting) it's cash on the barrel head for a service call or buy parts and start swapping them out to find the problems.
This is one of those "low water" top loaders that spins the clothes at such a super high speed that everything is wrinkled when it's finished, even on the "slow" speeds. It has no agitator because they claim "it doesn't need one!" Bull s***. That's ridiculous. It just sloshes the clothes around in 3-inches of water. It doesn't get the clothes clean.
Another problem is that there is no lint catcher because they claim "lint is ground up and flusheed out with the water." So you have to root out the drain pipe every few months.
When draining, the drain pump goes off and on over at about a 5 second cycle rate. I'm expecting that to fail any time. It pumps out a flowrate greater than called for in the specs and backs up in the standpipe. I know that for a fact because the previous washer was also GE and specs were for the same flowrate. This is fine for newer houses, but too high flow for our old drains.
I ended up having to seal the outlet hose to the standpipe nipple to keep it from backing up and running back down the nipple and leaking into the wall or on the floor. Floor is OK - but running into the wall caused a mold problem that did not surface until weeks later.
Summary -- does not clean, wrinkles clothes, makes a hell of a loud noise spinning, does not meet published specs. But all the overflows help keep the flloor sparkling! LOL!
Executive summary -- Don't buy any washer without an agitator or a high flow drain pump, and return it if it gives any problem the first few months.
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On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 9:54:45 PM UTC-4, Guv Bob wrote:
...Snip...

It has had a problem draining since it was installed. Customer service a re AMERCIANS (gasp!) and extremely good to deal with, but once it's out of warranty (my mistake for waiting) it's cash on the barrel head for a servic e call or buy parts and start swapping them out to find the problems.

ch a super high speed that everything is wrinkled when it's finished, even on the "slow" speeds. It has no agitator because they claim "it doesn't ne ed one!" Bull s***. That's ridiculous. It just sloshes the clothes aroun d in 3-inches of water. It doesn't get the clothes clean.

is ground up and flusheed out with the water." So you have to root out th e drain pipe every few months.

cle rate. I'm expecting that to fail any time. It pumps out a flowrate gr eater than called for in the specs and backs up in the standpipe. I know t hat for a fact because the previous washer was also GE and specs were for t he same flowrate. This is fine for newer houses, but too high flow for ou r old drains.

it

l


I have a comment on your solution - the sealing of the standpipe.
My washers have always drained into the utility sink so there's lots of roo m for water before any kind of flooding would occur. With the front loader I have now, we rarely get more than a couple of inches in the sink unless s omething is blocking the drain, e.g. a rag that fell into the sink.
However, when we had our old standard top loader, which used a heck of a lo t more water, the sink would sometime fill to the point where the water was higher than the discharge hose outlet. When that would happen, the back pr essure on the pump would prevent the washer from draining. The same thing w ould happen if the nylon "lint trap" on the end of the hose got too full to allow for the free flow of the discharge.
I mention this because it sounds like you are filling your standpipe to the top and the fact that you have it sealed is probably causing serious back pressure on the pump. Maybe that's why it cycles so often. Even if that is not the cause of the cycling, I'm sure it's not good for the pump nor for t he efficiency of the washer to be throttling back the discharge due to back pressure.

spinning, does not meet published specs. But all the overflows help keep the floor sparkling! LOL!

low drain pump, and return it if it gives any problem the first few months.
My front loader doesn't have an agitator and does have a high flow drain pu mp. It cleans the items quite nicely and my utility sink set up works bette r than it did with my agitator/low flow pump machine. Of course, that's mai nly due to how much less water it uses.
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 08:54:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I realize now you are saying it *should* have a high flow drain pump. Derby points out that there could be another problem. My old machine says nothing about whether it's high or low flow afaicr.

Well of course front loaders never do. My mother's front loader in 1953 didnt' have one either. But tossing the clothes around in the water is a lot like using an agitator.
Next time, I'm going to try to get one of those ecological models that has rocks in the drum and the clothes get tossed on the rocks. That's traditional, energy-saving technology. The rocks only need replacing every 20 or 30 years.

utility sink set up works better than it did with my agitator/low flow pump machine. Of course, that's mainly due to how much less water it uses.
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On Thursday, June 27, 2013 6:25:55 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:

h flow drain pump,

nd my utility sink set up works better than it did with my agitator/low flo w pump machine. Of course, that's mainly due to how much less water it uses .
This group recommended, and we selected Speed Queen AWN412. 3.3 cu. ft. White Top Load Washer
Wow! What a workhorse! HUGE opening, big tub, Built like a tank. solid, rel atively quiet, too.
We turned to this group for help when after frustration not finding a washe r with a 'simple' control What we needed was the ability to start a wash cy cle, stop, add chemicals, soak, restart wash WITHOUT HAVING ALL THE WATER D UMPED OUT!, soak, add other chemicals, etc. In other words a completely var iable length of time to wash. We had found a washer with what appeared to b e the manual control, but it was discontinued, unavailable and the replacem ent model, you guessed it, after grilling the sales person found out that i ndeed their replacement model ALSO dumps the water if you try to restart th e wash cycle!
Every one of the washers for the 'home' markets seemed to put their design efforts into making whiz-bang 'automated' controls and apparently NO effort s went into the design of the washer.
Thus, absolutely sold on avoiding washers that cater to the 'home' market a nd now will always go after models catering to the 'industrial' markets, li ke Speed Queen, that is *if* this model ever breaks down.
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On Thursday, June 27, 2013 6:25:55 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:

high flow drain pump,

nicely and my utility sink set up works better than it did with my agitator/low flow pump machine. Of course, that's mainly due to how much less water it uses.
This group recommended, and we selected Speed Queen AWN412. 3.3 cu. ft. White Top Load Washer
Wow! What a workhorse! HUGE opening, big tub, Built like a tank. solid, relatively quiet, too.
We turned to this group for help when after frustration not finding a washer with a 'simple' control What we needed was the ability to start a wash cycle, stop, add chemicals, soak, restart wash WITHOUT HAVING ALL THE WATER DUMPED OUT!, soak, add other chemicals, etc. In other words a completely variable length of time to wash. We had found a washer with what appeared to be the manual control, but it was discontinued, unavailable and the replacement model, you guessed it, after grilling the sales person found out that indeed their replacement model ALSO dumps the water if you try to restart the wash cycle!
Every one of the washers for the 'home' markets seemed to put their design efforts into making whiz-bang 'automated' controls and apparently NO efforts went into the design of the washer.
Thus, absolutely sold on avoiding washers that cater to the 'home' market and now will always go after models catering to the 'industrial' markets, like Speed Queen, that is *if* this model ever breaks down.
== This seems to be the trend for most mfrs - dress it up and put lots of automatic crap on it. I was glad to hear recently that Ford is going back to putting knobs on it's dashboard controls. Same for the cell phone gadgets - I see now that Jitterbug and others are around $20 a month for basic phone service. Then with all the extra savings, you can buy a deck of cards and play a game with "real" people!
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On 7/3/13 10:57 PM, Guv Bob wrote:

> Every one of the washers for the 'home' markets seemed to put their > design efforts into making whiz-bang 'automated' controls and > apparently NO efforts went into the design of the washer.
Do be glad you can still get one. I run a decade old bosch and it already has electronic controls. I don't think I can find a washer with mechanical controls here in urop. Top loaders around here are a (narrow and unuseable) joke.
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On 6/26/2013 8:54 PM, Guv Bob wrote: ...

crap. It has had a problem draining since it was installed. ...

...

...

...
We've one of roughly same age altho I don't know the precise model number.
It has none of the above issues other than I agree the high-speed spin sounds like an F14 getting ready for a carrier takeoff...
This house is nearly 100 yr old and there's no trouble w/ it overflowing the drains and the pump doesn't cycle. That problem is, to me, not the washer but an inadequate drain.
We do farm work clothes as well as regular and I don't see any problem re: getting them clean as the previous (also GE top-loader that was pushing 30 yr old before finally giving up the ghost).
Other than being somewhat noisier I've no complaints and have needed no service.
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finished,

clean.

number.

overflowing

the

no

Lots of good info, fellers. All complaining aside, I'm sure the drain is too small for this washer. I played around with it before sealing the drain and it made no difference if it the water was going into he drain or into a bucket - the pump cycles off and on either way. So I figured, I might as well keep it from leaking out and the sooner the pump dies, the sooner it will be out on the curb.
I kept the old washer that had worked great and had a real link filter basket. It's still sitting out in the garage. I had intended run a water pipe out there and use it for washing rugs, etc. The transmission seal was starting leak and it would have been $150-200 to repair it. Now I'm think I'll go ahead and get it repaired and sell the new improved model before it dies.
Another thing about the lack of a lint filter.... We wash mostly plain old clothes and towels, etc. Hardly ever anything with a lot of loose fibers like sweatshirts. The lovely wife says that with this machine, she has to clean the dryer filter twice during an average cycle, which tells me the washer is definitely (in technical terms) a piece of crap.
I wonder if they still sell this type of washer. Whoever designed it needs to have his balls shot off a high noon. LOL!!
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On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 6:39:57 AM UTC-7, Robert Macy wrote:

for tips and news on appliances check out http://atbayappliance.com/news-and-tips/ a reliable company in california.
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