electrical inspection - appeal?

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We just got our final inspection. Inspector says we need a few duplex outlets in a couple places. We don't want them there. We don't want to rip out the wall to put them. We don't want to have our marble countertops cut (back splash) to put them.
Is there an appeals process? If its not a safety related issue (these are just convenience issues) then how can we be forced to do so?
thanks, russ
p.s. I'm in Tennessee.
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Russ wrote:

Code requires receptacles in certain locations and within a specified distance from each other. The requirement is intended to minimize overloaded receptacles and extension cords running all over thre place. It is a safety issue whether you agree with the logic or not.
Can you fight the electrical inspector? Very doubtful. You've violated code. Your opinion doesn't offset that fact. Sorry.
Who designed the house and who did the electrical work? Both people should have known the code and prevented this situation from happening.
R
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... Your opinion doesn't offset that fact. Sorry. : : Who designed the house and who did the electrical work? Both people : should have known the code and prevented this situation from happening. : : R :
True. Sometimes waivers can be gotten before the work is done so a good justification (not a preference) exists, but once the code is violated, it's violated. You can argue it, but you won't win. See your yellow pages for gvt numbers.
Pop
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Convenience is your definition, safety is the code definition.
Having recepticals spaced at shorter intervals helps to avoid the use of extension cords on appliances such as waffle makers or electric fry pans that can pull a lot of juice. Before you say you promise never to use and extention cord, some day the house will be sold and the new occupant will.

They do have schools there. Read the code.
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electricians are much cheaper than lawyers.
see also: http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002/maindwelling/newdwel/newdwelshow.htm#3
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Any wavier of NEC would be up to the local authority, which employs NEC rules in the first place. Since most local authorities know nothing about electric code, it's doubtful they'd waive anything

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How about under-cabinet power strips? Tom
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If it is a blatant code violation you wouldn't stand much of a chance with an appeal. If it is a matter of code interpretation, you might have a shot. Did the inspector cite the section of the electrical code that your kitchen is not in compliance with? I'm surprised that the violations were not picked up during the rough inspection.
There are other ways to satisfy the code requirements for countertop receptacles. You can put receptacles on the cabinets. You can install Wiremold Plugmold strips underneath the upper cabinets.
If you care to post some pictures maybe someone can come up with a viable solution.
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Russ wrote:

I doubt if they would wave the requirements (they ARE safety requirements) even in Tennessee.
If you ever go to sell the home, you might well find that trying to sell a home that does not conform to code could be a real problem.
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Joseph Meehan

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In most places, (maybe every place) your house only has to meet the code for when it was built. I.E. - my 1950 house really only has to meet the 1950 code unless I do some remodeling. However, it sounds like whomever did your kitchen remodeling doesn't know the electrical code.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

But remember that often things have to be upgraded to code when other work is done in the area.
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Hi, You need minimum outlets per code at certain height and distance. Many times some outlets are covered by furniture, etc. Code is code and it's there for a reason. If you did something against code is appeal going to do? If one exception is made for some, then the purpose of code becomes lame. Whoever did the wiring, made bad mistake. Tony
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what kind of fly by nite did the work for you? sounds like they don't know what they are doing. I would start looking at everything they did for more errors.

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Your wants are not relavant to the issue. I have never done work in Tennessee but all of the jurisiditctions I work in would NEVER give you a inch when it comes to residential electrical requirements. They will staunchly stand by the mininium code and that is final. The very fact that you had an inspection indicates that there should have been plans submitted and FOLLOWED.
Are you the one that decided not to install the outlets? If so set an appointment for the walls to be opened up. If not then the contractor(S) might be on the hook for the omissions.
There is nothing that says the outlets can not be above the back splash.
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If you don't have duplex outlets within two feet of every point on the countertops, you're not meeting code, and you'll fail an appeal, anyway. (And it is a safety issue, it's just a stupid safety issue.) How high is the backsplash? You could probably put the outlets above them, and thus avoid having to cut the marble.
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Goedjn wrote:

Roughly translated Stupid safety issue = a safety issue the speaker does not understand, which is why there are codes in the first place and why they should be adhered to even if you don't understand why. In fact I would say it is even more important to follow a code you don't understand because you are less likely to take the measures to protect against the hazard you don't understand.

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wrote:

Had you noticed that you cannot buy a small kitchen appliance with a cord longer than 24". This is a counterpart spec to the building code applied to consumer goods. If you violate the 2'/4' rule you will have counter space dead to appliances or need an extension cord for some.
FYI: In addition to eliminating the need for extension cords, it prevents long lengths of cord from being on the counter which is a hazard if something gets pulled down (I think that was the primary justification for the rule in the kitchen). It also has other side effects like allowing manufacturers to use lighter more flexible gauge wire in the cords and making it easier for us to store our gadgets in the cabinet.
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What is the 2'/4/ rule?
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Doubt you will get anywhere, even though the code does not always make sense.
I have a large dining room. In order to meet (but not exceed) the code the builder spaced two duplex outlets on each wall. Eight in the room. Now think about it. In a formal dining room you generally have a China Cab centered on one wall and it will need an outlet for its light. You will place a server/buffet/sideboard centered on another wall and maybe you occaisonally use a chafing dish on it or have a lamp sitting on top of it. Rarely, if ever will you have any other load.
So guess where the cords for these devices end up. Hidden behind the piece of furniture? No, dangling out the side and looking like hell to get to the outlet that is off center in the room to meet the code spacing.
I'm getting ready to wainscoat the room. Guess where the outlets will end up and how many there will be.
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wrote:

You can always have them closer. To get a receptacle at a point on a wall where it really makes sense you may have to install another on the same or adjascent wall to keep the spacing less than 6 feet. Only if you are trying to install the minimum code do you get poorly placed plugs.
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