Dryer Trips Breaker...Except When it Doesn't

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wrote:

I have never seen anything but the compression sleeve.

A properly torqued termination will deform the wire a little and seal the contact point.

It depends on what it says. If the word "recommend" is used, it is not a requirement.

The ideal 65 is not listed for Al/Al splices.

When you consider hat a properly made Cu/Cu joint should never fail 7x is not that big a number. I still believe most of the aluminum problems are a workmanship problem. The same builders who were cutting costs with aluminum wire, were also taking shortcuts with the quality of the workman. In 1971, I knew guys who were starting as electricians right out of high school and wiring houses by themselves within a week. (Ryan Homes)
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wrote:

The new alloy is a LOT less succeptible to corrosion - which is extreme axidation.

If they are not listed, don't use them, regardless WHAT you think. You become liable if and when something goes wrong.

They are NOT approved for aluminum wiring - which says something.

ALL insurance companies in Ontario will insure aluminum wired houses with an inspection - requiring the conversion pigtails (expensive, and in my mind stupid) or coalr outlets

But gives them no "out" on 60 year old houses -

Not sure there are many "decent" home inspectors. Most I have run across are half blind and stupid. They don't see the obvious serious stuff, and pick up on all kinds of stupid little things of no real importance or expense to repair.
Home inspector doesn't notice signs of water damage in ceiling from leak in upstairs tub area - doesn't catch that the overflow is loose and has no gasket, tags a switch as installed upside-down when it is a three-way, complains about no GFCI in the bathroom, and totally misses an owner-installed steel stud wall in the basement wired with NMD wire and no grommets in the studs. Complains about no insulation on the concrete basement wall, but totally misses the fact the attic has barely R14 insulation and only half the vent area it should have, and the eaves troughs are 1/2 inch deep in roof grit off the deteriorated roofing shingles. Then he notes there are nail pops in the drywall, but doesn't notice the front step is crooked and the porch railing is rotted off on 2 of 5 posts and half the anchors to the brick wall areso loose they are holding nothing. And oh, yes - there are 2 cracked switch plates in the garage - where he totally misses the fact the door track is totally rusted away for the bottom 6 inches and the man-door at the back of the garage doesn't close properly because the jam is not square in the framing due to either poor workmanship, damage, or rot.
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On Sun, 28 Oct 2012 16:40:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It says they don't want to cannibalize the $5 a pop CO/ALR device market with a $2 device and pay U/L $50,000 for the privilege..
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
David Kaye wrote:

I kind of noticed that when I took the old breaker out. It is aluminum wire and the contacts on the breaker were...not exactly corroded, but like the wiki article suggests it looked like oxidation had done a number. I cut the wire back an inch or so and put in a new breaker and I'm in good shape.
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On Oct 23, 7:44 pm, triple7sss

Use the exhaust from a shop vac or from a leaf blower to blow out the duct. Try running the dryer with no hose on the exhaust, just the built-in lint filter and see if it still blows. If it does, then the exhaust system has nothing to do with the breaker blowing, and the problem is too much current being drawn by the dryer, or the breaker is going bad. You can get almost anyhandy person to move the dryer to a different breaker to see if the failure follows the dryer or not. If the substitute breaker also trips, the dryer is 99% at fault. If the new breaker does not fail, replace the original breaker.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

That is an excellent idea and why didn't I think of moving it to another breaker to test?!?!?! Thanks for that.
I did reverse my shop vac and first got a big face full of lint blowback which tells me that the duct was pretty well clogged. I vacuumed for a bit then reversed again and it would blow through.
I crawled under the deck and by shining a flashlight up the duct I can see great balls of lint inside. As I stand here today - that duct runs 16' to the outside of the house. My shop vac doesn't have enough ooomph to blow the lint clods out. Maybe it's time to try the leaf blower.
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On Wed, 24 Oct 2012 16:48:05 +0000, triple7sss

It will work IF you have another tandem breaker of the same capacity. Not terribly common unless you have electric heat or ?
/

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
clare wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm
I am lucky enough to be cursed with electric baseboard heat and have other 30 AMP breakers to try. I'll let you know.
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On 10/24/2012 10:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

I have 3 30A double-pole breakers. No electric heat. Dryer and built-in cooktop & oven (separate circuits).
[snip]
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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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triple7sss wrote:

There is a gizmo you can get. It's an arrow-head shaped nozzle, about 1/2" in diameter, for an air hose with exhaust ports pointing backwards.
You hook it up to your air compressor and feed it into the output end of your dryer exhaust.
Stand to the side or you'll get flocked.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
triple7sss wrote:

Thanks for the ideas and a couple things to update.
I reversed my shop vac and was rewarded with a face full of lint blowback. Indicates that the duct was pretty well clogged. Vacuumed down in there as far as I could get and then reversed and used the exhaust to blow and air goes through now.
Crawled under the deck and with a flashlight shone up the duct I can see giant balls of lint - not completely blocking anymore - and my shop vac doesn't have enough juice to blow them out or vac them back up. Sealed up around the shop vac hose going into the duct to generate more pressure but it is 16' from the dryer to the outside.
I also ran the dryer again with it vented inside and noticed that the BLACK wire going to the breaker gets hot. Not just warm but actually hot and is hot about 4 - 6 inches down the wire back from the breaker.
I don't know if this indicates a problem with the breaker or the dryer. The cord from the dryer to the wall is cool to the touch.
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*You need to push a brush through the duct to clean it properly and then blow it out. I put my brush in a drill and have it spinning while the dryer is blowing out cool air. I push the rotating brush in a few feet at a time and then pull it out and lint comes blowing out. Lowes sells a dryer duct cleaning kit and there are others available online. The hot wire could just be as a result of a loose connection on the circuit breaker. Tighten the connections on the breaker. If it still gets hot, replace the circuit breaker. There is also a slim possibility that the wire size is too small. You should also check with an ammeter how many amps the dryer is actually pulling.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
triple7sss wrote:

Bad breaker. I moved it over to another 30AMP dual breaker and the wire at the breaker never warmed up and never tripped. $15 later I'm in bidness.
Thanks everyone.
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 05:44:03 +0000, triple7sss

Like I said.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm triple7sss wrote:
clare wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/dryer-trips-breaker-except-when-it-doesn-t-718049-.htm
:-)
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