Dropped screws down drain

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First time I've done this.
In the laundry room. A box of tons of screws fell down into the sink below. Several ended up right at the drain. I was able to get out most of them delicately, but a few dropped down into the drain (plastic pipes).
Any tips on how to remove them now? I'm thinking possibly coat wire with magnet attached?
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magnet on a flexible thingie, can buy them most hardware stores
don't run water, though.
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Thanks, I'll check the stores for a flexible thingie. :) I won't run any water until I sort this out.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2012 15:00:47 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

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Big enough magnet and you can 'walk' the screws back out of the drain. The real question are these screw mission critical or can you do without them. if the latter, run the water and don't be concerned.
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The screws aren't critical at all. The problem though is that my house drains its water from a septic tank to a septic bed that is up hill and requires a pump to get the water there. Screws and such could 'screw up' the pump!
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wrote:

The screws aren't critical at all. The problem though is that my house drains its water from a septic tank to a septic bed that is up hill and requires a pump to get the water there. Screws and such could 'screw up' the pump!
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First put some decent magnets is a small cloth bag (tobacco pouch of the old days comes to mind) and lower that down the drain line.
If you can reach the line further down put some magnets at a low point to arrest the progression to the pump. Does the pump have a disconnect and a screen to block such accidents?
If so a temporary 'p' trap with magentas might help.
My grandparent's place in the country had a grease trap in line that was great at catching all sorts of stuff we kids managed to pass down the kitchen drain. Anything that went down the toilet was gone gone gone.
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I'd be thinking to take the trap apart. No sense missing one, if the magnet flexes in the wrong direction.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The screws aren't critical at all. The problem though is that my house drains its water from a septic tank to a septic bed that is up hill and requires a pump to get the water there. Screws and such could 'screw up' the pump!
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On Oct 25, 10:11pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Thanks Stormin'.
It looks like I'm all set to rock an' roll tomorrow.
I didn't notice that there was a square knob that allows access to the p-trap further down.
I was able to open it up, rather easily just now. The p-trap (bottom) is about a foot away from this opening. But it's angled down in a devious way, so I'll still need use the magnet trick to get those buggers out.
I'll send a fishing report sometime tomorrow. :)
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The nice thing about PVC. It cuts fairly easily with hacksaw, or Sawzall, and you can put it back together with Fernco couplers. Low pressure drain, even easier to patch.
I hope you get all the screws, easily. And your sewage ejector is saved.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Thanks Stormin'.
It looks like I'm all set to rock an' roll tomorrow.
I didn't notice that there was a square knob that allows access to the p-trap further down.
I was able to open it up, rather easily just now. The p-trap (bottom) is about a foot away from this opening. But it's angled down in a devious way, so I'll still need use the magnet trick to get those buggers out.
I'll send a fishing report sometime tomorrow. :)
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On Oct 26, 7:47am, "Stormin Mormon"

Thanks Chris.
I just got back from a successful fishing expedition. I bought a pack of pipe cleaners and some magnets.
I put some magnets in a small plastic pouch and hooked a couple of pipe cleaners to the bag.
I tried going in through the opening near the p-trap, but the bag was snagging in the pipes. So I tried going straight down the drain in the sink. That worked.
There was some water at the trap, which was to be expected. First catch, three screws. Second catch, two screws. Third catch, one heavier screw. Fourth catch, a nut!
I had estimated about 4-6 screws falling down, so I think I got em' all. :)
Thanks for everyone's help!
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I'm very pleased, for you. And thank you for sharing the good news.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Thanks Chris.
I just got back from a successful fishing expedition. I bought a pack of pipe cleaners and some magnets.
I put some magnets in a small plastic pouch and hooked a couple of pipe cleaners to the bag.
I tried going in through the opening near the p-trap, but the bag was snagging in the pipes. So I tried going straight down the drain in the sink. That worked.
There was some water at the trap, which was to be expected. First catch, three screws. Second catch, two screws. Third catch, one heavier screw. Fourth catch, a nut!
I had estimated about 4-6 screws falling down, so I think I got em' all. :)
Thanks for everyone's help!
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Very, VERY lucky that the screws have some iron (attracted to magnets) in them!
David
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I would also be reluctant to disassemble the p-trap. Even though you can get away with it most of the time, it's been my experience that the rest of the time the p-trap will leak at the union fitting after having been disassembled.
If that ever happens to anyone again, have your carpets shampoo'ed.
And, while the guy is there cleaning your carpet, ask him to use his carpet extractor to suck out the contents of that p-trap.
The vaccuum motors used in carpet cleaning machines are much more powerful than those used in ordinary vaccuum cleaners. I expect that a strong wind up the drain pipe would carry even steel screw up and out of the drain.
Or, at least, I'd try using a powerful vacuum before I took the p-trap apart.
--
nestork


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On Sun, 16 Dec 2012 03:05:39 +0000, nestork

Nothing that a dollars worth of new gaskets cant fix.....
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I always thought these were a good idea. Not sure that the whole thing needs to be clear, but the clear removable ring-catcher is cool.
http://www.amresupply.com/part/PS6165-P-TRAP-1-1-2-inch-CLEAR-CLEANOUT
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They're great, I put some in at the cabin It makes winterizing so much faster
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I'd expect that to pump a lot of stinky sewer gas into the room. Then, you'd have to go out to the carpet van, and have them drain the 200 gallon waste tank so you can try and disassemble the tank to get your screws back.
Paraphrasing Trevye, "I think you better think it out, again."
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I would also be reluctant to disassemble the p-trap. Even though you can get away with it most of the time, it's been my experience that the rest of the time the p-trap will leak at the union fitting after having been disassembled.
If that ever happens to anyone again, have your carpets shampoo'ed.
And, while the guy is there cleaning your carpet, ask him to use his carpet extractor to suck out the contents of that p-trap.
The vaccuum motors used in carpet cleaning machines are much more powerful than those used in ordinary vaccuum cleaners. I expect that a strong wind up the drain pipe would carry even steel screw up and out of the drain.
Or, at least, I'd try using a powerful vacuum before I took the p-trap apart.
--
nestork



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On Dec 16, 5:56am, "Stormin Mormon"

Uh, the vacuum exit on a truck mounted machine IS outside.
Plus you can easily put a few layers of cheese cloth over the tubes to prevent the screws from going all the way up inside. Or, a metal screenwire strainer, kitchen utensil. for extra support.
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Take the drain apart?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
First time I've done this.
In the laundry room. A box of tons of screws fell down into the sink below. Several ended up right at the drain. I was able to get out most of them delicately, but a few dropped down into the drain (plastic pipes).
Any tips on how to remove them now? I'm thinking possibly coat wire with magnet attached?
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