Drill Bits

Page 1 of 2  

Can someone give me a quick primer on drill bits? All I think I know is that high speed steel is the worst. Carbide tips are good. Where do cobalt and black oxide fit into the mix? My interest in is "standard" drill bits for thin metals and wood rather than masonry.
My Craftsmen sets are showing their age and wear. Where is a good place to buy drill bits? Should I look at an industrial supplier rather than a retailer?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mcp6453 wrote:

IME yes. I have some regular old HSS bits from McMaster-Carr and haven't had any issues with them in light use. The nice thing about HSS is that they can be resharpened.
If your Craftsman bits are just old and dull, you might try sharpening them rather than buying new ones.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

You and Steve made the same suggestion, but that doesn't solve the problem of my missing bits from my set! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

eBay is your friend. Cheap drill bits are easy to find, but quality ones are out there also. Or visit your local hardware store. Even HomeDepot carries good drill bits. And definitely get a good drill bit sharpener. I have one and I love it! Even cheap drill bits can be easily sharpened and given a new lease on life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In

Ebay is simply a tool which gives results dependent on the expertise of the user and how well they read the manual. It's not a "friend". In fact, without excercising care and RTFM it's one of the easiest places there is to get screwed.
Twayne
--
--
We've already reached
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Life is like that in general, is it not? No matter where you go and what you do, your results depend on your expertise, and if you are not cautious you can easily end up screwed.
Speak for yourself if you wish, but eBay is my friend, and with a little care and experience, it can be the friend of the OP. It it is a good place to find drill bits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zootal wrote:

Hmm, Define friend. I use eBay a lot but it is not a friend.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mcp6453 wrote:

If it's only a handful, order onesies-twosies next time you have to order from McMaster-Carr, or if you have a GOOD hardware store (mine closed, weep weep) they probably sell them in bins. You're going to break the 3/64" one the second or third time you use it anyway, unless you use them exclusively in a drill press.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't worry. They'll turn up. Or they won't.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I usually lose or break them before they wear out except for paddle bits...I have worn them out...Never thought about sharpening them though I just replace them.....How do you do those ???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just use paddle bits to drill a raggedy hole. That's about all I can get from them. I have never tried to sharpen one, but I guess it could be done with a small wheel on a Foredom, Dremel, or even a Makita die grinder. If I need a decent hole, I use a Forstner, and I have gotten a lot of those at garage sales. If I had to buy them new, I wouldn't. Some of these are so old, I have to cut off the faceted end to get them to chuck up.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was drilling 3/4 and 1 inch holes through 150 year old petrified 4X4's in my dads house for plumbing and heat(copper pipe)....After a while they just start burning their way through...Boy did that old wood stink when they started smoking...Went through a few...LOL...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
benick wrote:

I use a mill bastard "flat file" to sharpen paddle bits or any other bit I'm using out on a job. Of course a drill sharpener or bench grinder used with appropriate skill is much better for sharpening twist drills.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Buy a good drill bit sharpener. I have the Drill Doctor 750, and love it. Drill bits are from five cents to a dollar at yard sales. You already probably have lots of bits where a thirty second tuning would make them like new.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll take a look at that sharpener. I tried using one many years ago, and it did not go well. Is this one idiot proof?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/24/2009 1:56 PM, mcp6453 wrote:

I don't think sharpening drill bits is rocket science or that you need extra tools. Here's a first Google hit I got and I'm sure there are better:
http://www.essortment.com/home/drillbitsharpe_sbwh.htm
An occasional DYI'er like myself gets by resharpening with tools at hand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My dad was a lifelong machinist. He was a flight engineer on bombers in WWII in the South Pacific. He could take one of those little one by two inch whetstones and sharpen a bit in a couple of minutes. He looked like a surgeon looking at the angles, and holding his hands just so.
I never could get it. Even if I lived to be a hundred. Then with a badly broken thumb, bad wrist, and years of use and injuries, my hands don't work like intended.
For us, there are the cheating devices. I do good on knives, mower blades, chisels, and other stuff.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pretty close. I bought one about five years ago, and the new ones are more idiot proof. It sat in a closet for a long long time. When I did use it, there was a very short learning curve, and even the online directions went to the new one, and I had to search a bit for the instructions of the old one. It was so old, it had a VHS instruction tape.
They ain't rocket surgery, but there are a couple of little things you will catch on to. It sure is nice if you're in the middle of a project and smoke a bit to just go sharpen it, and not have to go buy one at a far away store or use the wrong bit and then wallow the hole. Especially when a decent sized quality bit is $10 now.
As I said, you can get lots and lots at yard sales for pennies, literally. I have THREE full indexes now, and that's mostly from just sharpening dull ones I had thrown into cigar boxes. I'd just buy more, but at garage sales. Occasionally, if I needed a letter bit for drilling a hole to tap, I'd go splurge on a new one.
From what I understand, the issues with the first ones were improved on the later models, but with the old ones, it would take a real doofus not to be able to work them. The biggest problem I have is sharpening small bits, but I am discovering that it is all in the touch. And listening to it when it cuts will tell you a lot, too.
Watch the video and keep the instructions. I understand there's a lot of valuable information in there. ;-)
HTH
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My local CostCo has a set of 99 Toshiba (or Hitachi) branded drill bits. Multiple copies of various and sundry sizes for $20. It's the gold colored metal, whatever that is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

that
black
metals
buy
retailer?
No, high speed steel is just fine in appropriate materials like mild steel, or softer materials.
Carbide is nice if you are working on hard material or if you are in a production environment where you have a need for higher speed and longer tool life.
Carbide tip drills are usually used for masonry or in some cases to drill holes in hard materials.
Cobalt is used for steels that are a little bit harder than HSS can handle (retainer pins) but not glass hard things like files.
Black oxide or the gold colored titanium nitride bits give you some advantages in corrosion protection and help resist galling, bit in and of itself means a whole lot less than the quality and the geometry of the steel below.
Check out McMaster Carr or another machine shop supply for the better quality drill bits, and you might want to order a few extra of the more commonly used sizes.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.