Does anyone make high-friction door hinges?

Some of the doors in my house won't stay in a partially open position because the walls are so out of plumb. One wall is 5/8" off vertical over the four-foot length of my level! So repositioning the hinges is out of the question. Anyone know of high-friction hinges designed to overcome this problem?
TIA
Ray
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It's easy enough to make your own. Just remove the hinge pin, lay it on a hard surface, and hit it in the middle with a hammer, just hard enough to put a very slight bend in it. Reinsert the hinge pin. Voila! a high-friction hinge.
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I have been able to bend the hinge posts just a bit out of alignment, causing more friction on the pin, and the door will stay put. Depends on your exact situation, but may be worth a try.
--James--
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I'm not aware of any. The usual solution is to remove one or more of the hinge pins and either bending it slightly or deforming it slightly with a cold chisel. Note which area of the pin has the mating hinge plate moving over it since there will be no benefit to deforming the pin portion that is stationary with respect to the hinge.
Over coming as much tilt as you have may be a challenge.
RB
Ray K wrote:

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Thanks for the great idea, Jim, Doug and RB.
Ray
Ray K wrote:

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Ray K wrote:

I hope that it sasfies you Ray, it's a hacker's solution which didn't work very well for me. My office door kept swinging halfway shut because the jamb was out of plumb. The building owner's maintenance guy's solution was to bend a hinge pin just like others have advised you here.
Maybe it was because it was a solid door and heavy, so he had to bend the pin severely, but the door felt weird every time I moved it it, with no "follow through" when I stopped pushing or pulling.
I straightened out the hinge pin and thought about making up my own magnetic catch to hold the door open. But then I went shopping and for a few bucks I bought a "latching door stop". it's a kind of a ball and spring loaded socket design, two parts which mount to the baseboard and the door. It works great, and the door feels "right" when I move it.
Just my .02,
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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Jeff,
Here's a clever door stop/holder. I have them on all my doors and they hold quite well even when the wind blows through the house.
http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/search.exe?BP=1 Magnetic Door Catch, part no: 47-175.
RB
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

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The magnetic latch idea is nice, but not for my situation. My problem is that one disengaged from the latch the smallest amount, the door swings to the full open position; I don't need anything to hold it open. I would like it to stay at whatever position it's at when I release it.
The earlier suggestions of bending one hinge pin worked perfectly.
Thanks to all,
Ray
RB wrote:

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