Dimmable CFL

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Hi, Came across a 23W dimmable CFL. Got one to try it out. It worked ~2 hours and pop, it went to full brightness and no more dimmable??!! Are they this unreliable? Or I got bad one.
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Please tell us the details!
The usual "dimmable CFL" to most looking for those means one that is safely usable with a "usual light dimmer". I find it hard to believe a lamp refusing completely to be dimmed by a usual-for-incandescent-type dimmer. Non-dimmable lamps tend to have short life expectancy when used with a dimmer against their instructions, and may blow the dimmer. Usually the lamp is what dies.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Packaging clearly said it is dimmable. I screwed it in side by side with 60W incdescent lamp, dimmed up and down a few times and noticed when dimmed too low it was scintillating. At certain point it quit doing that where I left it. Soon it went to full brightness while the other lamp was still dimmed. From then on it is no more dimming, just stay at full bightness.
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I suspect the ballast circuitry in the CFL had part of it fail, and the CFL converted itself into a conventional CFL. Those can have hardly any dimming and can appear to be at full brightness until the dimmer is dimmed past the point at which an incandescent has about 1/4 its normal brightness. They can also be hard on the dimmer.
CFLs also often dim more slowly than incandescents do at first, being about half brightness (or more) at a point at which an incandescent is about 1/4 brightness. A CFL may start dimming more rapidly when dimmed almost to being off, or may just suddenly turn off.
Special dimming ballasts for ballastless CFLs do better.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Tony Hwang wrote:

You can't really expect a CFL to have the same range as an incandescent bulb. If you are testing it to extremes you can expect it to pop.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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Blattus Slafaly ? (3) :) wrote:

expected to pop. I have 2 of them. They don't dim very well. By that I mean, when dimmed, they flicker quite a bit. The range is good if you can stand the blinkety blink. There are spots where they seem to settle down and be ok. BTW, I am using this on an X10 lamp module, so finding a "good" spot is quite difficult. With a real dimmer, it might be easier.
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I have this sinking feeling that dimmable screw-base CFLs at least sometimes lack provision to have their filaments maintained at a proper temperature when they are dimmed. I would expect some compromise in life expectancy with severe or moderately severe dimming.
One scheme mentioned a lot in some thread in sci.engr.lighting earlier this year is to have two sets of lights in a room - one for bright lighting and another for dim lighting.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Back to the old style 3-way lighting from before they made multi filament lamps and used several individual lamps instead. Put three small normal CFLs in that type of fixture and you're all set.
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 12:42:38p, Pete C. told us...

Hmm... Yes, like the old floor lamps that had 3 standard base sockets and one central mogul base socket. I wish I still had one of the really nice ones that my parents had. It was a beautiful lamp with marble base and engraved bronze post. An adapter could be put in the mogul base in order to use a CFL there, too.
We have several true antique tiffany-style glass and craftsman style lamps with mica shades that have either 2 or 3 pull chain sockets in them. However, I still use clear incandescent bulbs in them because the CFLs make them look extremely dull. I have thumbwheel dimmers on the line cords and I use slightly higher wattage bulbs than one might want so that when dimmed they give a much warmer light.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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I have replaced 8 can lights with 16 watt dimmable bulbs and they are great been in use about 1yr. I also replaced same situation lamps over my bar but on same circuit as flame type lamps on same dimmer. CFL lasted 2min. Seems like the CFL lamp is killed by voltage noise or disruption. Not going to plug CFL mfg unless asked. Frank
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 02:50:37p, Frank told us...

I think the problem is mixing incandescents of any type along with CFLs on the same dimmer.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

They have big honkin' CFLs with mogul bases too. They're starting to appear at the big boxes. You have to be careful though because there are also some similar looking mogul based CFLs that are designed to directly replace HID lights such as mercury vapor without removing the HID ballast.

Have you tried looking for a CFL with a warmer (lower) color temperature? Also if you try them be sure to try them for a few days since your eyes will adjust.
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 06:41:34p, Pete C. told us...

Thanks, Pete, didn't know that. Unfortunately, I no longer have any of the floor lamps I could have used one in.

It's not just the color (warmth) of the light that's an issue. It's the transparency of an clear incandescent and the filiment showing through that causes the glass shades to glisten. I doubt there will ever be a CFL that can produce that effect.
At least the upcoming ban on many incandescent bulbs will not include decorative bulbs like the very old style of swirled flame bulb. At least that's my understanding.
Another option I've used in very old lighting with two bulbs is wiring them in series. The bulbs last forever and the color and intensity is just right. I have one fixture that remains on constantly, that the bulbs are probably 30 years old or older.
As an aside, it's been said that Edison's home in Florida that is wired with DC power still has the working original bulbs throughout.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Boatwright wrote in part:

Just keep in mind that such century-life incandescents have energy efficiency so low that in order to produce a given amount of light, you increase your electric bill more than you decrease your lightbulb replacement costs.
The first-mass-marketed carbon filament incandescents had energy efficiency of a couple to at most a few lumens per watt.
There is a "centennial bulb" with a webcam showing a publicly accessable view of it continuing to work. I give low odds of its energy efficiency exceeding that of a 230 volt incandescent being powered by 120 volts, or roughly 1/4-1/3 that of modern 60-100 watt 750-1000 hour incandescents.
http://www.centennialbulb.org
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 08:32:16p, Don Klipstein told us...

I've no doubt of the inefficiency, but thought it was interesting, and I've seen the Centennial Bulb before. Just thought it was a curiosity.
As a further aside, my dad had a habit of installing double light fixtures with 25 watt bulbs at strategic places throughout the house and basement, wired in series, to produce a very low light level. He didn't like walking into dark rooms, especially when the light switch wasn't near the entry. To him, of course, this wasn't a waste of energy. Of course, this was in an era when energy consumption was not an issue or concern.
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Wayne Boatwright
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 04:25:21 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
[snip]

I have several small lights around for that purpose, although they're LED lights that use about 2.5W.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Mon 28 Apr 2008 05:28:13a, Mark Lloyd told us...

When my dad did this, LED lights weren't even a glimmer in anyone's eye. I'm not even sure LCD displays were around then either.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

For low lighting I use LED bulbs. They consume only 3W per bulb. Few different colors. Soon I hope LED will replace CFLs.
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For low lighting, if you use LED bulbs that have several lower power LEDs, I recommend green or blue ones for longer life if you can accept the color. The green ones are brighter. Many low power white LEDs fade, with a halflife often only around a year.
Same story with LED nightlights. Green and blue are brightest for night vision and red is dimmest.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Do you believe that 130V-rated (commercial?) incandescent lamps, operating at ~120VAC, are longer-lasting enough to be worth the hassle of getting them (wholesaler) and price, compared to an everyday bulb?
I recall that, some >30-years ago, I acquired one or more 130V-rated incandescent lamps from one of the local, "city sales" wholesaler. I don't remember following-up on the lamp's lifespan, but it was an attempt to increase the operating life of a hard-to-reach lamp.
My biggest road block to converting to compact fluorescent lamps is that all but one of my most-used light fixtures is controlled by a dimmer switch that gets USED.
I need FILAMENTS to illuminate my home. A governmental mandate - un-funded, I might add - to force me to convert to CFLs (beginning in a couple years) is unconstitutional.
The federal government may NOT legislate the forced conversion to a replacement technology unless it can be PROVEN that it is a superior technology in ALL ways but, most importantly, retrofit CO$T.
This is the twenty-first century! We can (and should) no longer avoid harvesting our own energy resources within our own lands.
Our air and water are cleaner than they have EVER been, yet, during that same time, we've been growing and prospering as a society. We've learned from our mistakes in the past. When we have an oil spill, it's often reported by the gallon instead of the barrel to prop-up the all important NUMBER.
A modern oil drilling operation has a surprisingly small footprint. When they are done at that location, they restore the site to before-drilling conditions.
We need to build more oil refineries domestically then go get more of OUR OWN oil. This would certainly slow the RISE in the price of gasoline.
We also need to start building more nuclear-powered, electricity generating stations. No thanks to prohibitive legislative and environmental enactments, it takes YEARS just to do the paperwork for a new nuke. That needs to be whittled-down to a couple of years at most.
It's only 2008 and we apparently can't WAIT to forget about 9/11. (2001 for those of you that forgot.)
Next March 28, it will be thirty YEARS since the TMI2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) "accident" and we can apparently NEVER forget.
Which event killed more people?
Carbon footprint? When compared to a nuclear power station, an equivalent coal-fired operation has a *HUGE* footprint. It's fuel is delivered 2-3 times a week by the >100-car TRAINLOAD. It adds to the MOUNTAIN of coal that a station keeps on hand.
Omaha has such an operation along the Nebraska side of the Missouri river. The railroad tracks bisect the city.
We also benefit from Fort Calhoun (nuclear) Generating Station somewhat further north upriver from OPPD's North Omaha (coal-fired) Station.
My utility is currently building a second, coal-fired unit outside Nebraska City - about 60 miles south of Omaha along the Missouri river.
I would LOVE another nuke.
But, I digress. Back to Thomas Alva Edison's most earth-changing invention: The light bulb.
The federal mandate to phase-out the common incandescent lamp is an unconstitutional encroachment on the private sector.
Banning ourselves (huh?) from harvesting huge fuel resources within our own lands is absurd at least. Considering the price of gas, it's become stupid, too.
We really need to grow a BRAIN and a backbone about energy: The BRAIN to build it (refinery, drill site or nuke power station) and the BACKBONE to OVERCOME all the hand-wringing and shrieks of anguish from the crybaby left while it happens - clean, safe and quite overdue.
--
:)
JR

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