current with switch off

hello all,
I've just started wiring up ceiling fans. But I'm confused on something.
Starting in the MasterBedroom. There is only one light switch with R/B/W/ground wires. White is nuetral and both Red and Black are power(hot). When I used a volt meter, I found that the Black/White shows 1.5 volts with the switch off.
Should I be concerned or is this normal?
-a|ex
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127.0.0.1 wrote:

Modern meters often are so sensitive that they pick up the stray voltage in the wires. The power gets there the same way power goes through a transformer. That is nothing to worry about. If you just wires any small resistance across those two wires it should drop to almost zero.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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ah, thanks... that makes sense now.
i checked the wires at the switch and boh R and B are connected together.
-a|ex
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| > 127.0.0.1 wrote: | >> hello all, | >> | >> I've just started wiring up ceiling fans. | >> But I'm confused on something. | >> | >> Starting in the MasterBedroom. There is only one light switch with | >> R/B/W/ground wires. | >> White is nuetral and both Red and Black are power(hot). | >> When I used a volt meter, I found that the Black/White shows 1.5 | >> volts with the switch off. | >> | >> Should I be concerned or is this normal? | >> | >> -a|ex | > | > Modern meters often are so sensitive that they pick up the stray | > voltage in the wires. The power gets there the same way power goes | > through a transformer. That is nothing to worry about. If you just | > wires any small resistance across those two wires it should drop to almost | > zero. | > | > | > -- | > Joseph E. Meehan | | ah, thanks... | that makes sense now. | | i checked the wires at the switch and boh R and B are connected together. | | -a|ex | |
They are? Or do you mean the black coming in from the fusebox direction is connected to an R going out to the light? If not: Could that have been a 3-way switch at time? There is something "funny" about the red and black wires if not as described in my first question.
Pop
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| 127.0.0.1 wrote: | > hello all, | > | > I've just started wiring up ceiling fans. | > But I'm confused on something. | > | > Starting in the MasterBedroom. There is only one light switch with | > R/B/W/ground wires. | > White is nuetral and both Red and Black are power(hot). | > When I used a volt meter, I found that the Black/White shows 1.5 | > volts with the switch off. | > | > Should I be concerned or is this normal? | > | > -a|ex | | Modern meters often are so sensitive that they pick up the stray voltage | in the wires. The power gets there the same way power goes through a | transformer. That is nothing to worry about. If you just wires any small | resistance across those two wires it should drop to almost zero. | | | -- | Joseph E. Meehan | | 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math | | |
You meant any LARGE resistance. A small resistor/resistance might burn or heat up if there is actually a voltage source there, depending on what the source is from. I use 1 Meg resistors, but even 100k would be OK to use. 10k probably OK too, but no smaller.
And the reading shouldn't drop to "almost" zero, it should drop to zero. If it's not zero, there is current flowing somewhere in there.
The OP shouldn't be concerned though. 1.5V (on what scale, etc.?) is going to be no problems. At 1.5V, heck, I'd grab it with my fingers even.
Pop
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Pop wrote:

True.

It should appear to be 0 on any consumer meter, but from a mostly theoretical point of view, it is almost 0. Again in reality you are right.

I also agree that the OP should be a little more concerned about those wires and what they are really doing that it appears he may be. I thought about addressing that issue, but did not. I am glad to see someone do so.
It just does not pay to assume anything in electrical work.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I would say it's normal, most likely a "phantom"voltage, esp. if your using a DVM. Thanks, Tony D.
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An AA battery gives 1.5 V.
JSH
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