Condensate on storm door

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I have a steel front door that leaks a little air, so I installed a storm door to help the situation. A contractor friend told me the steel door was installed crooked. He fixed it as best he could. Since I have installed the storm door, it is constantly fogged over and dripping with moisture. Is this an insulation problem, or due to high humidity in the house????
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woods wrote:

Which it is "it"????
If the it in question is storm door, given the hint the other door wasn't installed squarely I'd guess it's leaking warmer air from inside the house and that's where the moisture is from that is condensing on the cooler outer door/glass.
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I discovered a little trick to fix my sagging door. I replaced one of the screws on the upper door hinge (the part connected to the jamb) with a 3.5" deck screw. The extra length penetrated the adjoining stud, which magically pulled the door back to a level position. No need to adjust the frame in any other fashion. Now the door swings level, doesn't leak air, and is easy to open/close (as it should be).
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Trick? Magic?
If you didn't already have hinge screws that reached the "adjoining stud" then it's no wonder your door sagged.
That's not magic, that's just a piss-poor installation.
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That works sometimes - if the door wasn't installed correctly. There should be shims between the jambs and framing on both sides which would and should prevent much movement. Yours worked, but you got lucky. It's definitely worth a shot, though, if the door is not too far out of square.
R
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Both. There is not a lot of wiggle room with a pre-hung steel door. The best and surest solution is to remove and reset the door correctly. Failing that, the big box stores sell various types of weatherstripping. There's a type that has a vinyl bulb attached to a jamb stop that will help seal the jambs and at the head. The saddle can be weatherstripped with the type that has a vinyl flap attached to a flat piece of metal, and that is attached to the face of the door.
You should check the humidity level in your house anyway. There are bigger issues than a little condensate on your storm door, and those can cause hidden damage/rot.
R
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woods wrote:

Hi, I have a steel door and storm door like you. The reason is your main door is leaking warm indoor air causing the condensation. Apso storm doors come in many different quality level.
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 08:04:55 -0700 (PDT), woods

I can't answer your question, but I would call this condensation. I'll bet there is some difference between condensation and condensate.
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Either condensate or condensation is correct. Correcting something that is correct isn't.
R
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 08:55:09 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

I don't think I corrected him. I certainly didn't tell him he was incorrect. I was as moderate and polite as could be. In general, if a poster is going to be asking about this elsewhere, and especially if he going to be googling for it, he needs to know the word(s) people actually use for it.
I would still say that he should google for both words, because plenty of people only use the word condensation.

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It's just another one of those language oddities that make up, from what I can tell, about 30% of the English language. Like flammable and inflammable. Makes no sense.
R
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 19:02:04 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

So true.

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In wrote:

Regardless, but irregardless, there are sure a lot of them. Many of them, if you look up the origins are other languages that have been melded into English. If you want to see more interesting comparison, check out the differences between US English and UK English! And Canada seems to be a mix of the two, depending on where you are. Even a lot of pronounciation of the same spelling in some cases end up with entirely different pronounciations.
HTH,
Twayne`
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RicodJour wrote: ...

...
Condensate is the fluid that has condensed during the process of condensation...
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Would that it were so simple.
condensate con·den·sate /kənˈdɛnseɪt, ˈkɒndənˌseɪt/ –noun a product of condensation, as a liquid reduced from a gas or vapor.
condensation con·den·sa·tion (kŏn'děn-sā'shən, -dən-) n. 1.     the act or process of condensing, or the state of being condensed 2.     anything that has condensed from a vapour, esp on a window
Condensate can only be the liquid result. Condensation can be the process or the liquid result.
English is a stupid language. The Germans probably have two entirely separate words...and each one 13 syllables that describe in agonizing detail. ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

But nota bene the usage of condensation for condensate is a second definition, and that obviously came from a dictionary of common, not technical usage (wherein much colloquialism is entombed). In Perry's Chem E Handbook, "condensation" is used only for the process by which a condensate is formed.
"Condensation occurs when a saturated vapor comes in contact with a surface whose temperature is below the saturation temperature. Normally, a film of condensate is formed on the surface..."
"Another type of condensation, called dropwise, occurs when the wall is not uniformlly wetted by the condensate with the result that the condensate appears in many small droplets..."
Perry's Chemical Engineering Handbook, Chap 10, "Forced Convection (Change in Phase)"
Sorry, can't leave training behind simply by moving back to and picking up farming... :)
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Do I differentiate between the words condensate and condensation? Yes, as you and I probably have similar educational backgrounds, but it is not incorrect in common usage to use the two words in question interchangeably. Just because the dictionary relegates a particular definition to a lower spot on the list, it does not make that definition invalid. Right? A professor would deduct points if you used the words interchangeably on a test. Luckily, we're not being tested every day when we're just shooting the breeze.
R
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re: "A professor would deduct points if you used the words interchangeably on a test."
Why? If both definitions are valid (read: interchangeable) then what would justify a reduction in points if the words themselves were interchanged?
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They are not interchangeable in a scientific setting...and the professor is an ass - never liked him. ;)
English is a stupid language. Take skim and scan. People use them interchangeably, but scan can mean the exact opposite of skim.
scan /skn/ verb,scanned, scanning, noun verb (used with object) 1. to glance at or over or read hastily: to scan a page. 2. to examine the particulars or points of minutely; scrutinize.
R
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