concrete by the bag?

If you leave a bag on concrete mix in a damp place, you will have a hunk of concrete in the shape of the bag. right? so, why not pour the bag right into forms and water it? And it will eventually draw moisture from the surrounding soil to set up. This would be of course include re-bar. "If I can not dance, I want no part in your revolution." Emma Goldman
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cyber writes:

Yes, this is done for certain applications, like rip-rap embankments.
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Been there, Done that..
Standard practice when setting street sign posts, etc. The crew doesn't have to carry around a load of water, just the redy-crete bags.
I was looking at set of plans for a Pole Building and that was the perscribed method for the building posts.
Steve
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It works as long as you don't need strong even concrete. As noted it is a standard for fence post and such. However the concrete is not going to reach anything close to full strength.
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cyber Spilled my beer when they jumped on the table and proclaimed in

I did just that for one of the fenceposts here...However, if you need the concrete at it's full strength, you need to properly mix it.
NOI
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Thund3rstruck wrote:

I put about 1/3 of the total cement in the hole around the post, add some water and stir it up as best I can with a stick, then do the same for the remaining 2/3 of the cement.
Works for me, I probably end up with something better than not adding any water at all and worse than properly mixing it before pouring it in the hole.
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia Spilled my beer when they jumped on the table and

Actually, that's what I did with a fence post here. Then again, it isn't meant to support a lot of weight. just the post, the fence, and when the dog leans up against it...to bark at people walking by. <G>
If I need some concrete with any strength, I mix it properly...
NOI
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wrote:
[snip]

I bought cement mixer at Sears, probably 40 years ago, still going strong, just have to replace the belt from time-to-time.
...Jim Thompson
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wrote:

Works fine, especially for functions like soil stabilization. It's not strong, but if you're not building a bridge or a foundation that way it works fine.
If you plan on this, you might use a quick setting concrete designed for setting fence posts and the like.
Jeff
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A chunk of weak concrete.

It would be very weak and not good for much. If you're planting some posts, this isn't the worst way to go, but if you're making footings, it's going to be too weak.
John
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I wonder if how to mix it as it comes out of the bag. It must settle in the bag during shipping. Maybe pouring it out in long thin layers into the forms? Using a sprayer to moisten each half inch? How would the cost compare with having the Redi-Mix truck show up? tho this project does not lend itself to the big one-time pour. "If I can not dance, I want no part in your revolution." Emma Goldman
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Why not mix it as it is intended. You can mix it in a wheel borrow or they sell a plastic tubs for mixing small batches..
It costs a lot more for RediCrete than Redi Mix. I don't have the exact numbers.
If you are considering a pour of about 3-4 yds you can order a truck and it is much more cost effective. If you are like me and lack the help to spread, skred, etc. (working by myself), I ordered 10 yds of crushed rock, and 5 yards of sand and purchase my cement in the 90# bags as I go from project to project.
I have a cheap Harbor Frieght mortor mixer and do wheel borrow batch at a time.. I form up my footing or slab and do areas that I can manage in a half day..
I just did a 12ftx20ft 4 in. slab for my carport and it took a total of 4 half days. However I skipped every other day to allow the last pour to cure before working next to it.
I still have to do an additional 900 sq ft to pour for my shop and may have to order additional sand but should have plenty of crushed rock..
My method is the most economical, albeit slowest. But I'm retired and in no big hurry..
Steve
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: Why not mix it as it is intended. You can mix it in a wheel borrow or they : sell a plastic tubs for mixing small batches.. : : It costs a lot more for RediCrete than Redi Mix. I don't have the exact : numbers. : : If you are considering a pour of about 3-4 yds you can order a truck and it : is much more cost effective. If you are like me and lack the help to spread, : skred, etc. (working by myself), I ordered 10 yds of crushed rock, and 5 : yards of sand and purchase my cement in the 90# bags as I go from project to : project. : : I have a cheap Harbor Frieght mortor mixer and do wheel borrow batch at a : time.. I form up my footing or slab and do areas that I can manage in a half : day.. : : I just did a 12ftx20ft 4 in. slab for my carport and it took a total of 4 : half days. However I skipped every other day to allow the last pour to cure : before working next to it. : : I still have to do an additional 900 sq ft to pour for my shop and may have : to order additional sand but should have plenty of crushed rock.. : : My method is the most economical, albeit slowest. But I'm retired and in no : big hurry.. : : Steve :
For my 1CY job, I simply went to the local equipment rental yard and rented a trailer load of mixed concrete. Does require a 3/4 ton tow vehicle..
Rick -- Computer recommends - Hard drinking calypso poet
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I knew of the rental set up in So. Calif. They had as small batch plant in their back yard.. It os a great way to do a small job when you don't want to mess with the extra charge for delivery of a small load.
I looked around for the same thing here in Pac. NW but no one had the mix trailer or the batch plant weren't interested in selling directly to the customer..
Steve
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to
Where in the NW? seattle has these
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NaH! I'm out in the woods (what's left of them) in Mason Co... 90 miles from Seattle.
Steve
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Steve
I do the same thing. I never pour anything larger than I can reach across with the trowel (using both sides). That means about 6 feet wide. I got an old steel mixer that i bought for $5, but had to provide my own electric motor, cord and fan belt. I buy about 20 5 gallon pails of sand and stone whenever I want to do a pour, and just load them in my pickup. That way I dont have to pay for delivery, or handle the stuff twice. I buy portland cement and mix. I can make a stronger mix if I want. I know you order either 4 bag, or 6 bag mix. I usually make mine a 5 bag mix and it is always strong. I save lots of cement too by using up rocks and old concrete. I make my forms and toss all the old rocks I got in there. Just keep them at least one inch below the finished surface. I wet the soil under the pour area, and walk around on those rocks to be sure they are tight against the soil. I do the same with any old concrete, bust it up, and put it in the hole. I wet all these rocks and stuff right before pouring to insure adhesion. The rocks should not touch each other.
Yes, this is time consuming, but where I live, they wont deliver anything less than 3 cu yards. There are none of those haul your own ready mix things either. I dont know what I would ever do with 3 yards all at once. I'll spend the time, and skip the expense.
As for using the ready crete in bags, that is far too costly. I mixed and poured my whole garage floor last summer. The garage originally had a dirt floor, with one section of real bad concrete. I busted up the bad concrete, hosed the dirt off the pieces and that bacame part of the floor again. I did the whole floor in 8 separate pours. A total of I originally checked into having the concrete delivered. It would have cost me about $250 for 3 yards. I cheked into ready crete in bags, and it would have cost over $400. I ended up paying about $125 for all the portland cement and sand and stone. I actually poured about 4 yards total area (@ 4" thick), but only used 3 because of all the rock I put in the bottom.
One final note. I think that ready crete in bags is weak. I doubt that stuff is even a 4 bag mix. Whenever have used it, I end up adding more portland cement. That seems pointless.
One other thing, before I had the mixer, I made a wooden box about 5 feet long and 2 feet wide, and mixed it in there. The box worked great, but that is just too much work.
Gary
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I may not be understanding your questions.
Concrete (not cement, not masonry) in a bag comes in several different weight bags. The largest are about 80 # which is roughly a half cubic foot. There are 27 cu ft in a cubic yd, so about 54 each of 80# bags to make 1 cubic yard. When using Sackcrete, you mix it in a wheel barrow with the appropriate quantity of water. Most bagged mixes are only 2000-2500 # concrete with small stone. Ready mix is better concrete.
At $3/bag about $162 / CY Local ready mix varies, here it is $65 / CY Many companies charge a 3 CY minimum.

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