Code question on generator grounding

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But you had better check your local codes. It's likely they will not allow that setup. NEC et al are only starting points; then the local guys get into the act and add their own idiocy, I mean, opinions of how things should be. KNOW BEFORE DOING is the proper mantra. Otherwise you could be doing it more than once.
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On Mon, 8 Sep 2008 20:04:46 -0400, "TWayne"

Very true. However I am fortunate enough to live in a rural area not subject to codes. Nevertheless I generally do my own projects to code where the code make sense.
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Some of the panel makers make them. Square D makes them for their Q0 panels and I think they now have them for their Homeline panels. Others also have them.
Google "generator interlock kit" or see http://www.interlockkit.com /

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On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 11:02:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote Re Re: Code question on generator grounding:

Thanks!
It looks like it can be an interesting "home-made" project:
1) Make a template out of cardboard
2) Use the cardboard template to fabricate a working interlock from 1/8" aluminum plate.
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I did this in my previous house before interlock kits were available. It was not hard and worked very well. After checking the cost of the kits (ridiculous!) I plan to do it again, esp. since I have two 200 Amp panels, the kits would cost $300 to $400 depending on where you bought them.
In my situation, I do not want a gen large enough to power the whole house so I won't use autostart anyway. I will manually turn off the HVAC brakers before starting the gen. Then everything else in my house will have power available, even if I cannot run it all at the same time.
I had a 6KW gen hooked up this way before. Had a 21 day power outage and another 10+ day power outage and never a moment's trouble and no overloads of tripped breakers occurred. Saved a lot of $$$ on fuel by not having a huge generator.

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On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 12:55:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote Re Re: Code question on generator grounding:

You have two 200A panels in one house? Or is one of the panels in a work shop building?

I've have a similar configuration and experience with a couple of 10+ day outages.
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This is standard for homes with 400 Amp service.
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On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 12:55:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Your house must be way cool!

generator. To me, having the whole panel on the generator would be much easier to set up and much more flexible.
If the generator doesn't auto start, and I have never seen one that did, then you can shed which loads you want to lock out, and the family knows to be careful when the power is out.
The one time the daughter uses the blow dryer, and everything goes dark would be enough reminder. The breaker lets you safely test the limits.
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wrote:

But this is what you have to do if you use a transfer switch/panel that has only a few circuits. That's why I plan to backfeed the main panels.
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On Mon, 08 Sep 2008 23:48:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote Re Re: Code question on generator grounding:

Indeed, having the generator feed the entire panel is the way to go. That gives you the flexibility to choose which loads to feed at the time you need to use the generator.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

clear reference in the NEC. The intent of the NEC seemed to too establish a good single point ground at the entrance panel/meter base. I did this with two ground rods (10 ft as I recall) at the mater base. The run to the entrance panel is about 15 ft further inside my basement. I have six subpanels, and none of these are grounded...all neutrals tie back to the entrance panel.
My generator is located at the other end of my house, about 150 ft away. I have a 10 ft ground rod at the generator to which the generator is connected and a single #4 stranded copper wire, perhaps 200 ft long, buried along the perimeter of the basement that bonds this ground rod to the two ground rods at the meter base. At the time I did this I felt that I was in compliance with the NEC (although today I can't cite a specific reference.)
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