Can Toshiba tube TV be repaired now days?

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It's probably a simple repair, especially for someone that has fixed that same tv a dozen times. The tech would look at the symptom and say, oh it's that 100uf 250v capacitor again or the vertical drive transistor. That will be $110.00 for the repair. The repair is usually simple, knowing the part to replace is the hard part. Get the model number and put your question on some of the electronic repair groups. Maybe you'll get lucky. Mike
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Post your question with the exact model number to "sci.electronic.repair" [I've changed a single capacitor with the advice given there and restored TV sets. The key being knowing exactly the probably component.] Since you aren't electronically inclined, you possibly won't want to pursue this unless it is a well-known or easily diagnosed fault.
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Considering that analog over-the-air TV will shut down on 2/17/09, I would chuck it and buy a new one. 6 years old isn't new because it's an analog TV and it will be a boat anchor on 2/18/09.
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people have satellite or cable these days.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I use over-the-air TV. So does my mother. I got the converter box so that my analog TV (4 years old) won't turn into a pumpkin on 2/18/09.
Cable is not worth it to me. I think satellite is a better value but still not worth it to me - I hardly watch TV except for news, a couple game shows and Dancing With the Stars.
My apartment complex prohibits satellite dishes. I wonder if that is legal.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Tell your brother to treat himself to a nice HDTV. At least now he has a reason since his TV died.
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Don Klipstein wrote:

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html
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New Life Home Improvement
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 05:36:12 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

I guess news is one of the best reason to have cable. The local news is just fluff around here. I seldom watch anything on the networks. D list celebrities dancing and morons eating bugs is not entertaining to me.
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 00:37:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And DVD players, VCRs, etc...
BTW, I do know someone who has no broadcast TV source, and uses the TV only to play tapes and DVDs.
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Mark Lloyd
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How is that working out for them?
I've considered doing that as well as I'm in an area that is VERY difficult to get over air reception
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 10:38:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I spent the night with these people last December. A couple of teenage girls were up all night watching old "Time Tunnel" shows.

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Jodie Foster probably sees Carl Sagan as her savior...but he is dead and God is not. (to those who actually use all of their senses)
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No it won't. There are (and will continue to be for a long time) many sources of NTSC (analog video), such as cable and satellite receivers, DVD players, etc...
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Only if you are using an antenna. How many ppl don't have sat or cable these days?
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

process with a 3 year old 36" RCA, I thought I would chime in here. My TV just shut off one day, by itself. A friend told me about a place that did free estimates and he thought they were pretty good. So, we loaded up the boat anchor in the car, did the 10 mile trip and dropped it off. Later that day I got a call from the repair guy .... $129. I said of course, do it. If you can find a good repair guy with free estimates, it's worth a try. I didn't want to replace the TV yet because of an impending move and I figure the flat screens will still come down a bit more. It also fit real nice in the present entertainment cabinet. BTW, I got the TV back in 3 days and am very happy with it. After the move, in maybe 8 months or so, it will probably be replaced or moved down to a bedroom TV or such. But for now I don't have to fool with it. If you live in the Chicago suburban area (Countryside, IL), the guys at Fox Electronics are real good and fair.
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you can. Also search for some other clever search strings like "tv repair symptoms"
What you have is a problem with the vertical deflection. You already knew that. It can be a problem anywhere starting to where the signal is generated (on some chip), amplified, and wired to the yoke around the neck of the CRT. Usually the problem is the driver transister (vertical output). Or a bad solder joint. Or wiring. Or the yoke. In my experience, at least half of all faulty electronics are due to something physical: a bad solder joint, short in a multilayer circuit board, connector, cable, switch, etc.

yourself either unless you already have the requried electronics skills and can handle troubleshooting complex electronics. If it is going to take you two hundred hours to diagnose and repair, then you might consider your time better spent elsewhere.
A TV repairman, if you can actually find one, probably won't bother looking at it. Nowadays, anything under $400 to replace simply isn't worth being repaired. Consider that you're going to have to buy a digital tv adapter in february. Add that to the cost of the repair ($150-250) and you're well on your way to replacing it.

circuit board first. You'll probably need an osciloscope to trace the signal.
Most tv repairman nowadays only diagnose down to the board level. They have a stock of replacement boards so they can try swapping them out fairly risk free. If you try that, you'll be lucky if you fix it for less than twice the cost of a new TV.
Unless you live in your TV, this really isn't a home repair question. Try sci.electronics.repair. But, please, read the the FAQ and get a clue first. They're not going to teach you how to solder or procure basic troubleshooting skills that are already detailed in the FAQ. They will, however, be able to tell you if the particular tv model has a history of problems.
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

This should be a cheap fix if you do it yourself. Look at the vertical sweep circuitry. The problem could be a bad solder joint or electrolytic capacitor around the vertical oscillator chip, a high voltage electrolytic capacitor (probably at least 180 volts) in series with the vertical yoke (those coils of wires around the rear area of the CRT) , or the vertical output transistors. There are two of those transistors, and when one goes bad, so does the other one. In a lot of TVs the transistors are built into a chip, and that chip may also contain the rest of the vertical circuitry.
You may be able to find a schematic on the web, especially from Russian websites (a friend of mine bought a schematic from one for $5, maybe from http://top.eserviceinfo.com or Radio Locman), or your library may have Sams (not Sam's) Photofacts, either on paper or online. It's even possible that Sears.com has the repair manual online (they do for major appliances).
If you don't know how to solder and desolder, practice on a junk circuit board. The TV is probably made with one-sided circuit boards, which are by far the easiest to solder and desolder. Desoldering can be done with a suction bulb from Radio Shack, but copper desoldering braid is probably safer because it lessens the chance of overheating the copper traces and making them come unglued. A 30W iron is good for soldering single-sided boards, but 40W is better, especially for desoldering.
If you work on the TV, unplug it first! And don't set it upright on a soft surface, like a sofa or mattress, because it can easily tip foward (center of gravity is just 2" behind the front of the screen). So either place a pillow to catch it, or work on it face-down. Be careful not to bump or scratch the glass CRT.
Parts prices can vary a lot. Some good sources are MCM Electronics, MAT Electronics, Dalbani, Premium Parts, and Tritronics, but don't overlook Sears or even the manufacturer. Generic parts, like capacitors, can be bought from any electronics supply, but be sure they're rated for roughly the same capacitance (it may have to be fairly close for vertical timing capacitors -- I once replaced a 1uF with a 10uF, and the picture was only 2" tall) and at least as much voltage as the original. BTW capacitors can't be tested reliably with just a meter, even a capacitance meter, and bad caps can look perfectly good. If you're replacing electrolytic caps around the vertical chip, consider replacing all of them. And don't install any of them backward!
Even though analog TV is scheduled to go away in Feb. 2009, converter boxes are only $10-20 if you get a free $40 discount card (limit is two per person) from DTV2009.gov. I'm using one with a vintage 1976 TV that used to belong to my parents and still works fine (was made in Japan).
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On Mon, 09 Jun 2008 10:26:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Wow. I must be old. After reading the header I thought a this tube TV was a pre- solid state TV.
Times have changed. I guess a CRT TV is now considered a tube TV.
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