Can I replace my own sewer pipe?

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Every case is different, but here was mine. I hired a plumber to replace a bad line. The line left the house at about 4' deep, went across the yard, was about 6' deep at the curb, went to the middle of the street, then straight down an additional 15' to the sewer line. The sewer line had to be broken into, a saddle placed over it, topped with 3 bags of sacrete, everything backfilled and packed, and the street asphalt repaired. No way in hell was it a diy job.
Red
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Thanks Red, but depth may be my only issue.
The town already took care of the alsphalt-removing-sewer-line- breaking-saddle-connection-installation-backfilling-asphalt-patching part of the job. I just need to replace my cast iron and tie into their PVC.
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Copper sulfate monthly might be a lot easier way to clear the line.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

There might be an alternative not yet mentioned:
It is sometimes possible to insert a liner into an existing drain. The liner is made of stuff impervious to tree roots and it won't ever crack. Here's an example of a firm that does that sort of thing:
http://www.craftsmanpipelining.com/?gclid=CPWL_te06JcCFRIMDQodeEG-Cg
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it tends to cost as much as a dig and replace fix, but does save landscaping and the utter mess of a new line digging.
my neighbor is getting a new sewer line currently yard is piles of dirt, excavator, a true mess very sad
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

About a year ago the city replaced the main sewer line serving my street. The old sewer line was 8" concrete - the new is 10" plastic (of some kind). What's fascinating was the way they did it.
Starting at one end, they POUNDED the new pipe THROUGH the old pipe, fracturing the old pipe as they went! All day long THUD..... THUD.... THUD.
Eventually the plastic probe reached the end of the block.
Then they came along with an itty-bitty back hoe, dug up all the connections in people's yards and connected the individual houses to the new plastic pipe. They filled in the holes, placed sod over the mess, repaired the fence, and moved on.
Ain't technology grand?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

How do you know the pipe needs replacement? Unscrupulous drain cleaning services have been known to lie to customers in order to drum up business. Get a second opinion.
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Have you read the rest of this thread?
The first (and only) opinion I've gotten is my own.
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1. A well equipped plumber/inspector uses a SeeSnake or similar camera system which goes down the sewer on a pushrod. Most of these units can record to VHS or to some digital media. Ask to see the inspection by camera or a recording of it.
2. The marking of the line of the sewer pipe can be done at the same time if he is usig the kind of camera that includes a small 512 Hz transmitter built-in. This is standard in all the SeeSnake and most other models of piep inspection systems. The location of the camera at any given point in time is located using a locator receiver such as RIDGE's Scout or SR-20, or some othe rbrand that can detect the 512 Hz frequency. Each point is marked with chalk or spray paint. You get a neat dotted line along your yard showing you where the pipe is, if the operator knows his business.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 11:30:10 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
The problem with replacing your own sewer pipe is that you might make a mistake. First replace your neighbor's sewer pipe, and if all goes well, do yours.

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