Can I cannect fridge to a water bottle?

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Say one has a fridge with icemaker and water dispenser and no pipe to connect the supply tube to.
Does a solution exist where one can simply connect it to a water bottle and pump?
I googled a bit but mainly came up with stand alone ice maker replacement parts
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Well, you're need to hook it up in such a way that you'd have water pressure to push the water through the fridge.
I guess if you stuck a hose through the top of a water bottle, ran it all the way to the bottom, then stuck it on top of your fridge, you could do it if you got the flow started like you would by siphoning a gas tank...
It'd look odd, but I bet it could be done.
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sounds like a ideal use for a RV water pump!
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I might try that. Best if it ran on 120V so I could wire in parallel to the solenoid but a 12V power supply is not a problem.
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PipeDown wrote:

You need a fairly hefty amperage for an RV pump, besides they cost a lot.
Do you have a cabinet above the refrigerator? If so you have the ideal solution, just put a 5 gallon water bottle up there and pipe it down to the refrigerator with polyethylene tubing (food grade). Change it every month? You won't use more ice than 5 gallons per month would you?
Heck, you could just set a 5 gallon water carrier on top of the refrigerator if you don't have a cabinet above it.
As for piping, a simple saddle valve on your existing pipes would work. Then just run the copper tube through the floor at the back of the refrigerator space.
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No way, you need at least 15PSI probably more to push through the pressure regulator and valves and back up to the icemaker (which is only 12") below the top of the fridge. That leaves a 12" head in a 1/4" tube with obstructions. I would need to put the bottle on a tower to even get close. You would need at least 2 gallons in a tube above the icemaker I estimate. Perhaps with an inverted bottle.
What I really wanted was a cheap air pump to pressurize a 5 or 6 gal bottle and push the water through. Perhaps I can rig up something using my air compressor. Hmmmm.
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regular compressor MIGHT introduce contaminants, since they arent generally built for human consumption....
rv type much better, and a simple power supply like a wall one can power it if you can only find 12 volt ones
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Still over $50 even on eBay and I would still need to design how it would work/connect etc. I did find something just right on eBay, NOS from an out of business company but exactly what I want. Must have been hard to install. The other one I posted the link to does not need to be wired to the fridge but this one does. For $21 its worth the risk.
The compressor idea was never very good as water bottles are not intended to hold much pressure
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Build a combination water tower, satellite dish tower and then rent space to the cell companies for their antenna. You just have to be a bit more creative.
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wrote in message

Won't the microwave radiation from the dish and cell site boil off all the water before it gets to the icemaker.
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wrote:

How big is this water bottle going to be? A 2 or 3 liter soda bottle, or the size bottle delivered by a water company for a water cooler than doesn't have a water supply?
I suppose you could do it, but why not just get some ice trays and fill them with water?
Have you lived so long with autmatic ice makers that this is foreign to you?
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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Well, I had to order one of few side by sides that *don't* have an ice maker, since I have well water which is not the greatest (tests OK, taste not the greatest). You can hardly get away from it anymore. The water dispenser/ice maker soaks a lot of what should be food storage room; it's a shame to put in ice trays also.
I asked around about the same question before ordering my new appliances, and got pretty much a "no, never heard of it" for an answer.
Banty
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Banty wrote:

Thing of it is, an ice maker kit IS an OPTIONAL item on almost all side by side models today. Whether it comes ice n' water thru the door is another consideration
I say yes, if you get a tank that has drinkable water (taste and odor ok) in it, and a way to refill it, you can hook it to the fridge. This can be as little as a 2 gallon tank up to as large as you can pay for, install and use. The tanks I am talking about are similar to the tank you have hooked to your well pump.
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Well, I had to order one of few side by sides that *don't* have an ice maker, since I have well water which is not the greatest (tests OK, taste not the greatest). You can hardly get away from it anymore. The water dispenser/ice maker soaks a lot of what should be food storage room; it's a shame to put in ice trays also.
I asked around about the same question before ordering my new appliances, and got pretty much a "no, never heard of it" for an answer.
Banty
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Even more interesting question: Why have an auto ice maker if he doesn't intend to hook it up right?
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Thats easy, someone gave me it for free and its better than my old one.
I finally used the right keywords but still only came up with this http://watershed.net/flojet-wp.htm
A bit more than I am wanting to spend. It would be cheaper to climb under the house, cut open my aged rusty galv steel pipes and thread god knows how many couplings, nipples and unions back on to get a tap.
Right, actually I plan to repipe that section of the house later this year so I don't want to make a big deal of it now.
For now the icemaker module is removable si I can use the space, I just need to ignore the dispenser in the door.
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wrote:

Use a hose connected to a camping water-bag, and put a rock on the bag to generate pressure.
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wrote:

in the spirit of what you describe, do what I did in the same situation, I bought a saddle valve from Lowe's. you can get either the self piercing or the drill type. In your case, you'll probably need the drill type.
you can buy a kit that has all the parts you need for about $15 at your local hardware store. they usually come with a self piercing valve, but you can drill first, then put it on.
Turn off the water, mark where your going to drill, drill a tiny hole, put on the saddle valve, tighten, turn on water, look for leaks, put on water hose...then you should be ready.
I would suggest if you do this, check the valve a couple of times the first week for leaks, just to be safe.
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Yeah, ever tried that on Galvinized steel pipe that has 40 years worth of rust inside.
Sections I have replaced, are over 50% filled with rust. Whenever I fix one spot, another one starts to leak. I bet it has an infarction within a week.
Hence the planned repipe, Ill do that myself after I finish the present project.
Saddle valves are only good for copper IMO.
I did just think of another spot to tap. It is not too hard to get a two port valve to replace the one under the kitchen sink and 1/4" tubing is real cheap.
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wrote:

mine had 28 years of crud, so yes, I understand the risks, but like you I didn't want to cut a bunch of pipe to put in a tap. I was fortunate that it worked out with out any problems. my dad has used saddle valves on copper and PVC with no problems as well. I guess it's all a matter of the particular situation.
I like your two port valve idea, it sounds the safest. good luck, I hope it works out.
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