Broan 684 bathroom fan - Galvanized? NOT!

I just ordered a replacement 97006987G motor bracket, fan and assembly for my 23 year old Broan model 684 bathroom fan. The old one was painted steel, and turned to a bucket of rust.
The specification sheet at the Broan web site states that the new 684 "housing" is galvanized (I missed that qualifier... I thought it was all galvanized.) Not only is the fan bracket not galvanized, but it's raw freakin' steal with not even a coat of paint. What garbage. Don't buy one of these.
I need to give the bracket a good coat of primer and paint that will resist rust. A really good primer. Would 'yall please make some recommendations about the brand and type of paint and primer I should use?
I'm looking for something better than Rust-Oleum, and I don't mind going to an industrial supply house or the internet to get it.
Thanks.
Mac
http://www.broan.com/display/router.asp?ProductIDR3
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pc wrote:

You won't find anything better in a consumer paint product. True, the dry time is somewhat long, but that's the tradeoff for the proprietary resins that do the work. There are so called zinc-rich finishes that approach galvanizing for corrosion resistance with names like 'Co-Galv' or something like that. Probably available from Grainger or other industrial supply, and fairly pricey. Powder coatings are a mixed bag, because the baked on resin is not necessarily a rust inhibiting vehicle. Once the coating is breached, the rust spreads rapidly. For examples, check the pickup truck bumpers in the WalMart lot. You'll find some ratty looking powder coated examples there. The thickness of the peeling coating is the sure sign that it was a powder finish. If you don't know anybody running a hot dip galvanizing facilty, then you other choice is a plating shop. Doesn't take much to hang it on a hook and run it through with other parts while you wait, and the $ may be less than you think. Pick your best option and go for it. Good luck.
Joe
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Hammerite. Comes in spray cans, designed to go on bare metal so no primer required. Masterchem is the manufacturer which I think also produces Kilz. An Ace or TrueValue hardware store should have, as do some big box stores.
R
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 16:25:20 -0000, someone wrote:

Can't suck that much if it lasted 23 years.
How many more years are you going to live there?
How long will it take to rust out again? Will any other parts break before that? I replaced the guts of one of my bathroom fans after 5 years, I'd say your bucket of rust did pretty well for 23.
Reply to NG only - this e.mail address goes to a kill file.
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Thanks to all for your replies.
@@@@@@@@@@@@
I went to a local industrial hardware store and inquired about galvanizing primers. They were about to close and pointed me to a locked rack in the back, and tossed me they key. I found about four different products that would have probably done the job. The one that rang the gong was "SPRAY ON S00740 ZINC-RICH COLD GALVANIZING COMPOUND, MEETS MILL-P-26915C"; it was the only one that claimed to be a primer, and the only one noting a MIL rating.
It is essentially an epoxy based spray with 97% of the pigment as powdered zinc (I expected zinc chromate, but it must be an industrial health no-no.) They claim it to be as good as hot galvanized. Time will tell; considering that the cheap assed latex spray on the original bracket lasted 20+ years (and was more or less still holding its own, rust aside), this should live longer than I might live with a coat of Rust-Oleum or two on top.
On that note, considering that Broan is now selling new exhaust fan packages with a galvanized housing and a black steel core, it seems to me that Broan is, in reality, in the business of selling replacement cores, which cost about double what the whole damn package does at Home Depot and Lowe's.
With regards to the comments on sleeve bearing motors, I have one in my downstairs can that is approximately 43 years old. When the rotor stuck the first time, about 3 years ago (!), I took the mother apart, drilled a 1/8" hole in the sealed back side of the motor housing, put some Kroil in the hole and down the shaft at the front bearing (open) to loosen it up. I let it run for several hours with a desk fan blowing on it so it wouldn't overheat, since the normal fan wasn't there to cool the motor. I then dosed it with 5W-30 motor oil and let it run another few hours. I found some aircraft grade stainless washers from my days at Hughes Aircraft and reinvented the thrust bearings. It's still running like a top. You must be careful not to drill into the shaft, but I've actually done that several times over the years due, usually, to an excess intake of C2H5OH, and it din't seem to hurt 'em none. They are all still on the job.
I have a half dozen window fans in my house that I have given the same treatment. Some of them were made in the 50's; I bought one unit from the guy who sold me my first house 28 years ago. These so-called "permanently lubricated bearings" obviously are not, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to give them a new lease on life.
Ho hum. We each have our own realities; thanks again to all of you.
mac
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