Battery Question - Not as dumb as it might first seem. Would appreciate any advice.

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One problem is that a VOM doesn't draw enough amperage to know if the battery is any good. I had that problem with old carbon zinc cells, they would read 1.5 volts, but would not operate any device.
One quick and easy answer is to take a PR-2 or PR-4 bulb. Wrap the end of a wire around the bulb, about six inch of 14 ga house hold wire works well. Curve the wire in a C shape. Touch the bulb center spot to one end of the battery, the wire to other end of the battery. See if the bulb lights. If the bulb doesn't light, pitch the battery in the trash.
I've done this enough times, I can tell new, used, or dead.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My question: When do you throw a battery away?
The obvious answer I think everyone will advise is "When it quits working." However, I need a bit more advice then that. I have about 50 AA and AAA batteries not in any devices. Some used, some new. I have a Volt Omh Meter. The batteries are 1.5volt. At what tested voltage should I discard the battery. I know that some batteries that won't power one device because it is running out of juice, may run something else. I get that. BUT,
IN GENERAL, at what voltage would you disgard a 1.5volt battery? Is it when the battery reaches a % of its original power?
Thanks B
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These are very nice. I own several. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Button-Battery-Checker-Tester-AA-AAA-C-D-9V-/270923830756?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f145195e4
I like the swing meter, gives me a good idea if the battery is any good.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My question: When do you throw a battery away?
The obvious answer I think everyone will advise is "When it quits working." However, I need a bit more advice then that. I have about 50 AA and AAA batteries not in any devices. Some used, some new. I have a Volt Omh Meter. The batteries are 1.5volt. At what tested voltage should I discard the battery. I know that some batteries that won't power one device because it is running out of juice, may run something else. I get that. BUT,
IN GENERAL, at what voltage would you disgard a 1.5volt battery? Is it when the battery reaches a % of its original power?
Thanks B
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Generally I measure the shortcircuit current(quickly). That make sorting the batteries very easy. Compare to a known new one of the same brand. Voltage does tell you less about their condition. You need a 10 Amp range on your meter.
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my $3 Harbor Fright DMM has a battery test mode that loads the cell(370 ohms) and you read the current. I use it -and- the no-load voltage reading.
they were giving the DMM away free with a coupon,now IIRC,you have to make a $10 purchase to get one free with the coupon.
But CHECK the basic voltage accuracy!!! my first one was WAY off. but I exchanged it for a good one.
--
Jim Yanik
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Thats how I saw one junk yard test batteries, with a screwdriver.
I was fooling around one day in a military van. Sort of accidentally dropped screwdriver on battery I was checking. Large battery with tops unscrewed. I ran out of that van, or jumped down. 6 fountains of electrolyte hitting ceiling.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@Notmyemail.com wrote:

Hit the Dollar Tree store and get a few flashlights. Put your old batteries in them. When the light doesn't light any more dig into the battery pile and find another good battery.... you aren't supposed to mix a dead battery with a good one, or different types... it goes on and on. I've got rechargeable batteries, I've got alkaline, I've got heavy duty carbon zinc, I've got batteries made by companies at places I never heard of and can't pronounce. What I've finally done is just buy a bulk package of them at the dollar store. The remote sensor for the temp part of the atomic time clock... that thing, sometimes a couple of batteries will last a year, sometimes a month. And finally, Dollar Tree had solar lights, for a dollar ? I bought one to take apart, I'm suspicious, it has one of those pull strips so I'm thinking it's actually just a battery operated thing and what looks like a solar panel is actually just a light sensor. I bought it to take apart just to see. I was joking with the cashiers about using it to go off grid and one knew what the joke was about the other didn't have the slightest idea what the joke was about. Summery, Flashlights... for messing with computers I like the AA size, incandescent bulb ones. The light spectrum works best for me. For serious light a hand held 12V spot light with a small rechargeable lead acid battery. A million candle power so they claim, those will light up your life. Summery 1.2 Batteries batteries batteries, laptop batteries, little 12v batteries for the remotes, 9 volt for the smoke alarms, the car batteries, the riding lawnmower battery, the camera, the electric drill, the cell phone, the APC, high dollar lithium for long storage life. Batteries 101 could be a lower level college course.
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"Mr. Austerity" <"PrintMo.Money "> wrote

Invest in, or buy at a yard sale .......... a good digital tester. I have a $25 Radio Shack that will measure a 2v. DC range. It gives digital LCD readings to the second decimal place ..... as in 1.37 v. It makes managing batteries easier. I have boxes of 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5+. When I need a battery, I can choose one of those variations depending on if I need it to be strong, or just strong enough.
This helps me out, particularly in managing my nimh batteries when going out for a job, and they've been sitting for a month.
HTH
Steve
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On Feb 26, 4:17pm, snipped-for-privacy@Notmyemail.com wrote:

I was once told, "If you're going to save your battery for a while, DON'T test it!" Further went on to say that testing the battery under load condition, although tells you the condition of the battery today, starts a chemical process that ages the battery, it will be gone in six months to a year on the shelf. Conclusion was that to have a battery when you need one, don't perturb it.
Any battery specialists out there to confirm/deny their comment?
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wrote:

I was once told, "If you're going to save your battery for a while, DON'T test it!" Further went on to say that testing the battery under load condition, although tells you the condition of the battery today, starts a chemical process that ages the battery, it will be gone in six months to a year on the shelf. Conclusion was that to have a battery when you need one, don't perturb it.
Any battery specialists out there to confirm/deny their comment?
****
I agree on not load testing it, but just a very small digital tester would not draw much off the battery.
Steve
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An alkaline battery, maybe 1.3 with a remote, but even a regular flashlight will be dim. I usually check them just by voltage and usually good enough. Sometimes when I find my battery tester, I use that. The old dry cells had more voltage but more resistance. Typically 1.65 volts. I have had dry cells last 20 years and still provide some output. I have had nicads last 50 years.
Some harbor freight batteries I have, mostly aaa, start leaking and making noises. Alkalines.
Greg
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rg:

I've not had any luck with NiCds lasting,unless they get frequent use. let 'em sit,and they short.

the HF alkalines I bought,half leaked even before I used them. they were AAA cells. I will not buy HF batteries any more.Thunderbolt was the brand name.
I USED to have good no-leaks service from Fuji Novel alkalines(from Big Lots),but the new versions leaked badly. they're off the list too.
my last buy was Ray-O-Vacs. I may try Walgreens brand next,when they're on sale.
--
Jim Yanik
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