Anyone know how to fix a pocket door?


Got two clients (actually one client & one friend) who have pocket doors that are off their tracks. Pain in the ass. Both are different but similar; as near as I can tell, one was probably installed in the 1960s, the other one probably 15 years ago or so.
Both have finished walls that are inaccessible. Does anyone have any clever tricks for getting these goddamned things back on their tracks? I've looked at them, scratched my head and come up with zilch so far.
Many thanks to anyone who can give me a clue here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

Take a look here at how they should be installed and how to repair them.
You should be able to remove one trim member in the top of the door opening and access/remove the door.
http://www.johnsonhardware.com/pdindex.htm
Boden
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/7/2008 9:18 PM Boden spake thus:

>

Thanks--great stuff! I'm hoping I can get them working without having to cut into the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

The usual problem is that the two parts of the hanger have disconnected. Use a lever under the bottom of the door to raise it so the two pieces slot together, then turn the latch until it clicks to lock everything together.
Here's a closer look:
http://jhusa.net/images/2610/2610Ficon580.jpg
And here's a drawing:
http://jheurope.com/images/jh/bulkparts/bpcad580/1120.gif
The instructions above are simple, but performing them is tricky. 1. Put a lever under the bottom of the door. You'll use your foot to raise and lower the door. 2. Align the peg on the wheel section with the large end of the keyhole opening in the plate on the top of the door. 3. Raise the door just enough that the peg enters the keyhole. 4. Slide the peg sideways into the smaller end of the keyhole. 5. Turn the locking plate until it clicks around the peg. This locks it into place so it doesn't come apart again.
I use two screwdrivers to slide the parts of the hanger back and forth and a lever to raise and lower the door. The first time you do this will require 6.5 hours to learn the technique. ;-) Following efforts take as little as three minutes.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a similar problem.
The links and pics posted by previous posters show pretty high-end trucks and tracks. On mine, the track was a single rail and the trucks had a single wheel. I got the door off by taking of the trim, but there was no way to get the track off and a new one in. I ended up cutting through the drywall on the back side of the wall and installing high-end tracks and trucks.
A contractor friend suggested that I try using a car jack or something similar to spread the pocket as much as possible to get access, but it didn't work because there were cabinets on both sides. It might work if you have open walls.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How much do you think you could spread the pocket before messing up those little studs? You're also more likely to crack the drywall.
If the cabinets are not full height, you could open up the wall further down and use bit extenders and self-tapping hex heads in a magnetic bit holder. A pain in the ass, but it's rock and a hard place.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zz Yzx wrote:

Not suggesting your track was this way but many have a keyhole slot...pull track, it slides back to the wider hole in the slot, lift track off.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OUCH! Actually, the old rail DID have keyhole slots, but the contractor (builder) didn't use them, it looked like they used washer-head screws and a power driver, right through the rail base. And judging by the condition of the rail (nasty bends in the lip, paint on it but not on the wood inside the pocket), I bet it was salvaged.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.