Anti-slip Paint

Hi, Sweepin, shoveling snow lately but thinking ahead for summer. My porch rises about 6 steps and back porch 4 steps. I'd like to apply anti-slip paint, so stairs will be little safer. Any recommendations? TIA,
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On 1/11/2011 5:43 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Typically you just ask for anti slip (small glass beads) to be added to the paint at the paint store.
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I have used the glass beads route. Works good and I think it would look better than sand.. My &.02 worth. WW
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That would work also RG. But don't walk on it barefoot. WW
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My front steps were like ice when wet, they were wood painted with floor and porch. Next time I got some anti slip in the form of silica powder that I mixed with the paint from Lowes. Works like a charm and does not settle out of the paint during a painting session.

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On 1/11/2011 7:48 PM RRW spake thus:

Sounds good. Just realize that silica = sand.
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wrote:

I used Shark Grip on the top of the pontoons on my boat. It worked great and a bottle of it was only about $5. The way I did it was to paint the top, shake on the Shark Grip from a spice shaker bottle, then I dusted a little more paint on top with a spray can to seal it in.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

1. Mask off the steps except for 3-4 one inch areas running the long way
2. Paint the unmasked areas and sprinkle grit. The grit can be most anything including ground walnut shells but plain old sand is generally used.
3. Let dry and paint the unmasked area again.
4. Let dry, remove tape and paint the entire area.
You *could* do the above without masking and wind up with the entire step being anti-skid instead of just strips but non-skid areas tend to hold dirt; the strips hold dirt too but at least you have a nice pattern :)
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Get the anti slip from your paint store. Stay away from sand additive. Had some Sears epoxy garage paint containing it, and all it does is make cleaning impossible without improving traction. Subsequently used the commercial plastic safety strips, a far better way to go.
Joe
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Try some Walmart porch paint non-slip. It cheap.
I have added sand to paint, but tends to rub off. You can also attach antislip strips if you have a nice shiny surface. It comes in rolls.
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wrote:

Many years ago I built an 18 foot inboard boat from wood; no fiberglass involved. There were areas where I need non-slip painted surface, and was advised to use ground up pecan shells mixed with the paint. I guess the idea is similar to the sand mixed in, but the pecan shells did not readily sink to the bottom.
At any rate, it worked great. That was almost fifty years ago, so I don't know if it is an outdated technology or not.
Bob-tx
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