Alkaline Battery Leakage: Dissolving?

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wrote:

I'm not saying this would work for a flashlight, probab not, but
For the car, I'm so lazy I don't bother to make a solution, like I was told to do. I just pour on the baking soda and slowly pour on hot water until it stops bubbling. Then I figure I'm done.
I thought I had to remove the baking sode from the fridge in my NY apartment when I left, as part of cleaning the place, so I took it with me. Then there was another box in the fridge here. Since I ony use the baking soda for absorbinhg odors in the fridge, which has some special surface and never has odors., it took 25 years to use up the firsrt box of baking soda, cleaning car batteries.
Now I'm on the second box. but I haven't used any yet.

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Water, then clean, apply deoxit, wd40 or your favorite lube. Sometimes the plating comes off and your in trouble.
Greg
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On 11/14/2014 01:17 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

The suggestions you received will probably work if the leakage is minor but it sounds like you have a major mess on your hands.
The last LED flashlight I bought was only $3 or so, I would not bother trying to fix it if it went bad
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Per Stormin Mormon:

I did. Thanks.
Turns out there was another way to get to the affected parts: a screw-out piece that took a pin wrench, but was not obviously removable because of the corrosion. Strap wrench, pin wrench.... a little careful torque, and I was in business.
Gave up on chemical means and just used a razor blade to physically remove the corrosion that was obviously preventing a circuit. Was surprised at how much of the aluminum went away when I scraped the corrosion off - arguing for use of the proper chemical to reconstitute the alu instead of just carving it away.
Tangentially, this light cost about thirty bucks at Lowe's over five years ago. Just bought a box of three flashlights that are even brighter at Costco for fifteen bucks total (i.e. $5.00 per flashlight) and they even came with batteries).
Only feature of the old light that wins out over the $5.00 lights is that the $5.00 lights take three AAA batteries and the old ones take a couple of C batteries which gives them an extremely long life in use.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 11/15/2014 9:48 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Nice to hear when something works out. The AAA lights probably fit in a pocket, easier.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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but if the batteries go dead sooner, you will be more likely to replace them before the start to ooze.
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Per Pico Rico:

Point taken.
--
Pete Cresswell

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