220 volt to 110 volt

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Steve Barker wrote:

Sir, I defer to your greater knowledge of trolling. LOL
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/elvis voice on
thankya, thankya very much..
s

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I can't imagine why he would want to switch it from 240 to 120.
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So that he won't have to pull a new cable, of course.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

There is that, but he'd probably have to pull one anyway to handle twice the current.
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Depends entirely on the size of the motor (as noted in gfretwell's post above). If it's 1HP or less, he almost certainly does *not* need to pull heavier cable.
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If this is, in fact, 2 wire plus ground cable it is an easy option. As I said in another note this should be wire in pipe.
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wrote:

As everyone else told you, NEVER use the ground wire as the neutral. If you actually meant the neutral, meaning you have a WHITE neutral, and a black and red hot (or two or either color), Then you can do something. You'd need to run the 220 to a separate breaker box, install a dual breaker for the pool, and a single 15 or 20A for the 110. (at the pool location) Of course you also need an actual ground, and there are likely restrictions for a breaker box by a pool (and it must be an outdoor type box if it's not in an enclosure). If the 220 wires to the pool pimp are in a conduit, you can likely shove a white wire thru. If not, start digging !!!!
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Should be fine, note on setups like this with long wire runs from the box, the motor startup surge can introduce significant spikes which might damage poorly designed electronics. Lights fine.

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Wrong. See posts earlier in this thread by gfretwell and myself for explanations of why.
Please don't offer electrical advice without understanding it.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I assumed the poster spoke correctly and there was a neutral, yes I know stuff that only uses 240 often is fed with two hots and a ground. My bigger worry would be if the 240 breaker was larger than 20A which is not allowed for standard wall plugs.
wrote:

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But he never actually said that he has a neutral. He's *assuming* that there is one. This is a common assumption among people who don't understand how North American 240V service works, but it's usually a mistaken assumption.
Most 240V *appliance* circuits *do* have a neutral (because they also have 120V control circuits).
Most 240V *motor* circuits do *not* have one.

It'd be one heck of a big pool pump, to need a 30A 240V circuit...
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Doug Miller wrote:

He expressly referred to two hot wires, a ground wire, and a wire he referred to as a "common." 4 wires in all. What are you suggesting he means by "common" other than neutral? No one is suggesting he or anyone else wire anything without verifying for certain that that is the case. But we have only what he stated to go on.
Since you're the one who is coming to the conclusion that the wire he refers to is NOT a neutral may I ask what you think it is? Everyone else here believes he is referring to a neutral...yes yes it should be verified...but that's what he said and I'm puzzled why you draw some other conclusion.
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:43:02 -0000, Steve Kraus

Indeed, I second the request. With all 4 wires accounted for, just what do you (Doug) think the OP is referring to by "common" and "ground" ?
Guess what: Some professional electricians will run a neutral in a 240v circuit even if the application doesn't require the neutral. They do it because it's a good practice that can save a lot of aggravation down the line.
Admit it Doug. You read it wrong. It's as simple as that.
Question: when you screw up some wiring, are you just as obstinate in admitting the mistake?
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See my response to Steve. Perhaps the third time you read the same thing, you'll finally figure it out.

Yes, some do. Most don't.

No, I didn't. *You* read it wrong. Maybe if you take a deep breath, re-read the original post -- where the OP never said that he actually looked to see what's there -- and finally think about it even just a little bit, you might possibly begin to realize that you don't have a clue.
But probably not.

I've made no mistake here.
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Go back and re-read the original post.

And he never explicitly stated that he actually had all four.

Geez, I thought I'd already made that clear -- I think he's referring to a neutral that he *assumes* is present because he misunderstands how 240V circuits are wired, and thinks that all circuits have neutrals. Look at it this way: if he *did* understand how 240V circuits are wired, he'd know what to look for and he'd know what to do with it, and would not have asked the question in the first place.
In a 240V motor circuit, it's *very* unlikely that there is a neutral conductor present. The OP never said that he actually checked. He's assuming that there is a neutral. That assumption is probably incorrect.

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He has not said if he's looked but he hasn't said that he hasn't either. You are making an assumption based on the utterly ridiculous contention that if he did look and saw four wires he wouldn't be bothering to ask. Why is that utterly ridiculous? Because a non professional might still ask to make sure that it's OK in terms of safety and code since as we all know there are many things that might physically work that are not. Is it ok to put a 120V receptacle on one side of a 240V line? Will it work...of course. Is it safe and to code? That's the real question here and you went off on a tangent.
Since the man asked if it's ok to hook up based on the presence of a neutral the logical response would be to treat it as though there is one. Naturally if there isn't then he cannot do it that way. Everyone else is treating the case based on the facts presented by the OP, whether those facts are verified truth or just assumed. If you want to add a little kicker along the lines of "hey there's a good likelyhood there is no neutral present and in that case here's what to do" then fine. But you're insisting that the poster's question is wrong on the face of it. Everyone else is answering the question as given.
Is this a game you play? If a someone asks a question--any question--then obviously they must not be capable of doing the task they ask about. Trying to turn this place into alt.hvac?
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 02:56:12 -0000, Steve Kraus

Actually if you read the original post, the OP could have a neutral with only two current carrying conductors if he converts the circuit to 110V, which is what he is asking.
To answer that question with any certainty you would need to know the HP of the motor, and maybe the distance from the pump to the panel.
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Terry wrote:

No, I don't think that's what he's asking although I agree there is at least a touch of ambiguity. While he does use the word "convert" in the first sentence when he says what he is proposing in the second sentence he refers only to things at the outlet end, nothing about at all about converting entirely to a 120V circuit.
If he's proposing anything at the breaker end it's not contained in what he stated. Until he says otherwise I will presume he means to put a 120 outlet across one leg of the "220" (240) and neutral with a ground. Whether the neutral is there or not remains to be seen but that's the proposal that I get out of the posting.
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I'm thinking WE ALL were duped by a troll. Did you all notice that not once did the OP come back with answers or further questions? We all fell into the trap this time.
steve

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