220 volt to 110 volt

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Far cheaper to buy 220V lightbulbs.
While several people have pointed out you should never use a safety ground as a return, the OP did not say that. He uses the word common, a term sometimes still used for neutral. He therefore may or may not have a safe way to do this. He says common wire AND ground wire, implying he has both available.
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Or he may simply be unaware that 240V circuits don't have a neutral, leading him to think he has one when he really doesn't.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Nov 20, 11:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Being a 240V line to a pool pump, this raises another issue. Where is the GFCI? If it's in the panel, then he needs one that will accomodate both 240V and drawing 120V on the same circuit. Some GFCI are strictly 240V and if you unbalance it by drawing 120V from one leg to neutral, it will trip.
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On Nov 20, 1:52 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Exactly! Just too many open questions.
The OP has not posted sufficiently concise information to make a complete conclusion. In other words the OP may not be knowledgeable enough to ask; let alone complete the work safely and in accordance with code.
That's often a problem with these "If I did this ..... " questions. We, trying to help, are all asking more questions, perhaps jumping to or postulating reasonable conclusions and/or saying "If this, or If that .... ."
Still think for safety and insurance purposes the OP needs to consult a 'knowledgeable' electrician; not just some Joe around the corner who 'says they know what they are doing' (and by the way I am not a licensed electrician so this is not a comment protecting an association or anything!).
Electricity around pools should not be taken lightly! There are several ways to arrange things that would 'work'; but whether safe or satisfactory to insurance or electrical codes ....... ?????
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TimR wrote:

Or just put two 120 volt bulbs of the same wattage in series across the 240 volt line. <G>
It's likely not to code, but thinking about it, each side of the 240 volt circuit is only 120 volts above ground, and for a zillion years table lamps didn't have polarized cord plugs, so there was a 50-50 chance that the threaded portion of the light bulb sockets in them were 120 volts off ground.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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[dumb joke snipped]

No, it's not -- and when the OP is clearly not an expert in electrical matters, this sort of joke isn't a good idea at all.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I couldn't resist...It's getting close to Xmas and I thought of those series strings of many low voltage incandescent bulbs plugged into 120 volt sockets.
Jeff
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wrote:

Nobody asked you the most important question. Is your pump motor 240/120 convertible? Most are with a simple swap of a jumper under the bell cap. The next question is, what does it draw at 120v? Generally speaking I would say you can do this if it is 1HP or less. Probably not if it is 1.5HP. I bet you have 14ga wire going out there (15a). This will need to be GFCI protected.
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On Nov 20, 2:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why should he be converting the pump motor to 120V, when by all indication he has a 240V circuit with neutral and ground and he just wants to add a 120V load?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

*What* indications?
I see *nothing* in the original post that indicates the presence of a neutral. The fact that he's using the circuit to run a 240V motor strongly suggests that there is *not* a neutral, as 240V motors neither need nor use a neutral and thus are typically wired without one.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Perhaps you should reread it:
"Is this as simple as taking the 220 wires, and connecting only one hot wire side with the common wire and ground wire to a standard 110 volt outlet?"
One hot wire...common wire...ground wire. What do you suppose he means by "common wire" other than neutral? He's certainly NOT referring to the ground wire since he says "common wire AND ground wire"...clearly two different wires. And of course he doesn't mean the other hot since he expressly stated "connecting only one hot wire" let alone that it would not make any electrical sense.
We won't know unless and until he clarifies but presence of a neutral is VERY STRONGLY suggested in the OP. There is really nothing else "common wire" can mean. There is no need for this blather about using ground as neutral. He never said anything of the sort.
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 06:22:33 -0000, Steve Kraus

Nice post Steve.
It's amazing how some people can't read a simple paragraph with any degree of inference.
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--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I suppose that by that, he means the neutral wire which he *imagines* to be present in the existing 240V motor circuit -- but is almost certainly absent.

I agree that it's clear he knows the difference between the two. What's not at all clear is whether he -- or you -- realizes that 240V circuits typically do *not* contain a neutral conductor.

Sorry, but that's just not correct. The description of the circuit as powering an existing 240V motor "VERY STRONGLY" suggests the ABSENCE of a neutral conductor.

Neither did I. But there is no evidence whatsoever, absent an actual count of the uninsulated conductors present in the cable or conduit, that the OP does in fact have a neutral available. Many people do not understand that 240V devices do not have or use a neutral conductor. The OP may be one of them. You appear to be another.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Better still, count the insulated ones. There's probably only one that's uninsulated.
Many people do not understand that 240V

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<g> OOPS! Pardon me while I wipe the egg off my face. Thanks for catching that.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Someone wrote:

Some of us even occasionally call the two legs of a 240 volt circuit, "Phases"! Which in North American residential service is most unlikely to be true. But let's not introduce that (phase) complication into a very unclear original question; still lacking information. I give up! Who's on first ...... etc. :-) :-) :-) BTW. The reason for the constant reference to 'North American' (which seems to be a good working system capable as it is of supplying both 120 and 240 volts) is because in Europe and elsewhere a 240 volt supply could very well be one 'hot' wire at 240 volts (50 hertz) and one 'neutral' at around zero volts. But could also be (in some systems) two leads, neither at a zero potential, neither really considered to be a neutral but at 240 volts (50 hertz) with respect to each other. However the two leads 'could' in certain systems be 'phases'. :-( :-(
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THREE days now and no response from the OP. We should be able to plainly see this was a troll.
s

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Steve Barker wrote:

Oh come on. If he's a troll then he's a genius troll. Who could possibly foresee that a simple question like that, reasonably clear but for his use of "common" instead of "neutral," would lead to so much needless argument?
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anyone who follows this group....
Who could possibly

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