12 volt impact wrench

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Good luck keeping the tool on the lugnut while trying that trick. The chances of that trick working on an overtorqued lugnut are about zero.
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Goedjn wrote:

I've had jacks (more than one) that didn't have any surface that was usable for something like that. One example was the one that had nothing but a hook on its business end for hooking into a slot on the car.
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The limiting factor is usually the socket on the lugnut. An adult jumping down on a tire iron can produce over 200 ft-lbs of force assuming it didn't slip off, but 30-40 ft-lbs is probably a typical maximum before a cheap tool slips off.
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wrote:

That's why I use a 1/2" drive breaker bar instead of a short tire iron. I don't need to jump on it,either.You can generate more torque by lifting up on the breaker bar/lugwrench then trying to push down on it with your weight.
Is "G" suggesting you use the tire jack to lift up on the lugnut wrench to break loose the lugnuts? A great opportunity to have the thing slip and go flying with some force in a random direction.
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Jim Yanik posted for all of us...

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says...

What if they warp the brake rotors?
That gets expensive.
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snipped-for-privacy@abuse.gov says...

Not nearly as expensive as losing a wheel.
And it seems that brake rotors are finally getting cheaper. I recently bought a pair for my son's Stratus at Auto Zone for $15 each.
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snipped-for-privacy@hartigan.dot.com says...

Yep, but cheaper <> better. Figure on rotors for every brake job. It's not a biggie if you do the work yourself, but check out what the shops charge for those $15 rotors. Midas, anyone?
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I'm with you, carrying the breaker bar. I've heard tell that some shops have contests. See if Joe can put the lugs on so tight that Steve's wrench won't get em off. Of course, they end up replacing studs, rotors, drums, etc.
The goal would be to get a rusted lug off after starting the motion with a breaker bar.
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The 12V HarborFreight driver only has an impact every couple of seconds(beats per minute,IIRC= 20).And rated at IIRC,150 ft/lbs. Most impact wrenches have 100's-1000's of BPM.They might be kinda slow.
**BUT,I've never tried one.**
I use a 1/2" drive breaker bar and socket. If you pull UPwards on the bar,you use your leg muscles instead of body weight when pushing down. IMO,you get more force.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@abuse.gov says...

The downside of using a breaker bar is that you're far more likely to break the bolt. An impact wrench is MUCH better for this situation.
While I have never used a cordless impact wrench, I would tend to have little confidence in a 12V unit. Nevertheless, I will defer to someone who has actually used one.
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Mike Hartigan wrote: ...

You break grade-8 lug bolts w/ no more than a 1/2" breaker bar routinely enough it's a problem???? :)
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snipped-for-privacy@swko.net says...

I broke one many, many years ago. That one was enough to break me of the habit. I've no idea how many I may have damaged prior to that one, but it was probably more than none.
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Mike Hartigan wrote:

In some 50 years I don't recall ever breaking a lug bolt on anything from passenger car to tractors and combines. Being as they're hardened and decent-sized diameters, I think it likely there was a fracture-failure already present to break one w/ just a simple bar (or, of course, you're undoubtedly able to apply much more of a lever-arm than I when applying same... :) ).
I worry far more about the over-torquing of the average tire-shop grease monkey w/ the impact wrench on max at 150 psi over-stressing the bolt and/or stripping threads, not to mention warping brake rotors...
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I did that a couple vehicles ago, changing shocks. The breaker bar sheared off the bolt, and an impact wrench loosened the bolt. Ah, well.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Oh, that's easy enough for a Grade-5, probably no more than 5/16" or 3/8" bolt -- probably better off to replace it, anyway.
My point was simply that a Grade-8 lug bolt is pretty formidable to shear w/ no more than an ordinary 1/2" breakover bar unless it already had a stress-fracture or had been over-torqued w/ the aforementioned tire-shop zealot w/ his impact wrench...
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Rear shocks, Chevy product. The bolt I broke was the main one coming from the frame. I twisted the nut (3/4 or about that size of socket) and the bolt broke off. Looked like it would make for a LOT of work to replace that large a bolt, and not designed to be replaced. Not sure what the hardness was, but the broken bolt was supposed to take the force of the shock absorber.
I know what you mean about the repair garage guys and their over active impact wrenches. I got a safety inspect one year, and came home. Figured to try the lugs, see if.... yep the only thing I owned that would loosen them was a 25 inch breaker bar.
I get funny looks when I tell the repair garage to put the lugs on finger tight, and I'll set the torque before leaving the parking lot.
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The one time I did a tire change for a friend, I started the lugs with a breaker bar, and then it woulda been nice to hvae an impact to get them the rest of the way. She had a X-wrench which helped a lot.
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 03:43:54 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"

I avoid any impact tool that is rated at less than 400 ftlbs. Waste of money.
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