What work gloves do you use for heavy infestation of poison oak & ivy (covered in urushiol)?

What work gloves do you use for repeated immersion in very heavy impenetrable thickets of poison oak & poison ivy?
I'm covered in black poison urushiol from head to toe!
So far, these are the gloves I've tried (most of which failed miserably)! - Pics here: http://yfrog.com/jc45906740jx - Album http://img696.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?idE906740.jpg
Specifically, what skin is best for repeated washings? - cowhide? goatskin? deerskin? what skin is best? And, what gloves are available that are long and durable? - garden gloves? oxy-welder's gloves? mig welders gloves? (what else?)
Cotton/leather work gloves are wholly unsatisfactory: - They wash well; but the thin leather is worn out after 1 or two uses; - They're too short to be of much use in heavy infestations; - Worse yet, the back cotton allows urushiol to penetrate to the skin!
Leather work gloves are slightly better, but still wholly unsatisfactory: - They're strong enough to take the wear of a few uses in the chapparal; - But they're too short so my wrists get covered in the black oil; - Worse yet, an XL comes out of the wash as an L which is smaller still; - Yet the leather gets hard as a rock after a few wash cycles!
Cowhide oxy-acetylene welder's gloves are also unsatisfactory: - They're nicely long so they cover the wrists perfectly; - And, it's no problem finding an XL size to fit my large hands; - And they're thick enough not to wear through on the first few uses; - And they come out of repeated wash cycles as hard as serpentine! - But they're just too cumbersome to use around power trimming tools!
I just tried the pigskin mig-welding gloves with some success: - They're nicely long, almost as long as the O2 welder's gloves; - They're all leather like the leather garden gloves so they're strong; - And the leather is thinner than gas welder's gloves (nice and nimble); - And, you can get them in XL sizes which don't seem to shrink too much; - But they too get hard as a rock after repeated wash cycles!
Next I'm going to try the goatskin mig welding gloves: - Like the pigskin mig welding gloves, they're long & seemingly durable; - And, they seem to give a bit more "feel" than the pigskin gloves do; - Also, I can get them in XL sizes (but I hope they don't shrink too much); - Mostly, I hope they don't get as rock hard after a few wash cycles.
If the goatskin mig welding gloveds don't work, I'll try the deerskin mig welding gloves; but there must be someone out there who has worked in heavy impenetrable thickets of poison oak and/or poison ivy and/or poison sumac who has solved this problem.
What other gloves can you recommend for protection when cutting through heavy thickets of poison oak, when you're covered in black urushiol marks from head to toe?
Requirements are: - Available in size XL (and needs to stay XL after repeated washing!) - Must be durable (can't have any cloth) and must cover the wrists! - But can't be so thick as to hinder the use of power tool controls. - A bonus would be if it stays pliable after repeated machine washings!
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On Apr 9, 2:30 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Go cheap and just throw them away when you are finished.
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Address.invalid> wrote:

Go cheap and just throw them away when you are finished.
That's what I do...I buy the big bag of brown cheapo gloves at Wal*Mart and toss them...Works for me and I'm VERY allergic to that stuff...HTH...Why make it more complicated than it needs to be??
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On 4/9/2010 2:30 PM, Elmo wrote:

A chemical worker would use rubber gloves that are washable. Any leather is going to be permeable or hard to wash.
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Elmo wrote:

NONE of the above. ANYTHING that can absorb the oils is no good.
Visit a fire equipment store and buy a pair of gauntlet style extrication gloves. These are made for use with power equipment, BUT they hape a moisture barrier inside them which stops oils, gas, blood, water from getting though and reaching you.
To protect farther up the arms you could buy a pair of the sleeves sold there as well.
--
Steve W.
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So, Elmo, why aren't you just killing these awful plants with glyphosate? Why bother wrestling with them?
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Work gloves? Who needs work gloves? I'm lucky enough to be pretty damn near immune to the stuff, and I just pull it out with my bare hands. Ask around -- maybe someone you know is like me, and would be willing to pull it for you in exchange for work on his place, or beer and pizza, or a sawbuck or three...
If you live in the Indianapolis area, maybe we can work something out. Email doug at milmac dot com.
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On Apr 9, 2:30 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

WHATEVER YOU DO DONT BURN IT. THE SMOKE IS LETHAL.
Jimmie
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Elmo wrote:

I'd try welder's gloves (or similar) to keep from getting burned as I operated the flame-thrower. (Don't forget the ear, eye, nose, throat, and underarm protection.)
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 18:30:08 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

http://www.unitedglove.com/leather.htm
a) Cowhide dries stiff when it gets wet, becoming hard and losing its flexibility. b) Goatskin leather has the highest natural lanolin content, which makes a very soft and flexible glove that retains its pliability after getting wet. c) Deerskin gloves do not stiffen after getting wet repeatedly and form to the hand over time. d) High lanolin content keeps pigskin leather soft which does not dry out and crack after repeatedly getting wet.
So, it looks like, for repeated washings, you want: 1) Goatskin 2) Pigskin 3) Deerskin 4) Cowhide
In that order.
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Elmo:
I come very late to this discussion, but have been reading your posts for years and know you are very determined and usually find a solution.
In this case, I have worked, lived, played, even had ...hmm, a few "intimate experiences" <unfortunately> in and around poison oak.
So, that's some 42 years, if you count from about 8 years old.
The messages saying that the oil disappear after about a year or so, are true in MY experience. I can't guarantee it for you and your particular bushes. Maybe you have cream of the crop, top quality hybrid poison oak and the oils last for centuries.
But for my Oregon poison oak on MY ranch, it lasts a year or so.
Unlucky enough to "get a rash." Zanfel is a wonder drug. Technu makes a competing product that works just as well and is usually a little cheaper. But neither are cheap. A small tube of the stuff is $25 or more, but compared to poison oak misery, it's worth it. Just make sure if you buy the Technu brand you are NOT buying just their cleaner.
What you want is Technu EXTREME. You can google both Zanfel and Technu to read about them.
A trip to the doctor also works, but is even more expensive and then you get ultra high doses of steroids, which I prefer to avoid.
Finally, you'd be amazed at what a GOOD heavy equipment operator can do for you, or the suggestions they can make. It wouldn't hurt to call one to take a look. Pricewise, and misery-wise, you could come out way ahead
Tim
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