Weed Blocker for fruits/veggies?

It's getting near time to plant some tomatos, onion, peas, etc. I'm
planning on expanding my tiny garden into some of the lawn area. I'll
get rid of some of the grass (and weeds) and then turn and add peat
moss to the soil. Then, I'm thinking of just putting down some of that
Weed Blocker stuff and put some holes through for the plants.
It seems too lazy to be morally correct, but I really hate weeding. Is
there some other reason, other than a Puritan upbringing, which
suggests that weed blocker is not a reasonable idea?
Reply to
dgk
I did indeed. The guy said it was fine soil for planting almost anything. He suggested starting with some lime and then a vegetable/fruit fertilizer every six weeks.
The peas were growing really quickly indoors so I put a few of them outside, along with some romaine and onions that I got at Garden World. It's likely too early for the peas but I'll see how they do. The rest have been transplanted to pots and will go out soon.
I started ripping up some lawn area to use for tomatos. That's tough work. I figure I'll rip up about a 12 by 5 foot area - much tougher than it looks.
I did try some of the weed blocker material and it will likely be ok for the tomato section of the garden, but is too unwieldy for things like onions where you need a lot of holes. Once you put it down, it's difficult to put plants in. When you need to put in plants 4" apart in rows 12" apart it's difficult to work with. And I think the squirrels will rip it to shreds.
What's the problem with peat moss? Oh. This?
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I thought the whole purpose of the stuff was to retain water in the soil. Now I feel bad about buying it and won't do that again.
I did take your advice about the lights and just propped the tray of seedlings on a south facing window. The seedlings are about two inches tall and some are developing the real leaves. I'm keeping an eye on them to make sure they don't get leggy.
Reply to
dgk
Interesting that he'd suggest lime, if there was established turf, and you're switching to veggies in that area.
I doubt it's too early for the peas. More likely, it's too late. Good luck with them, though! Maybe the weather will stay cool enough to harvest some. I'm zone 5a, and when I grow peas, they're in the ground either the last week of Feb, or the first week of March.
hahaha yup! A good, sharp, square spade should make quick work of it. (Or, rent a sod cutter and be done in a few minutes.) =)
Yup. As an alternative, you might consider using straw as a mulch. It's heavy enough to stay put, and as it breaks down, it's beneficial to the soil. =)
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, and it won't really do your soil any good. It will /really/ affect pH. While most veggies like the soil on the "sour" side, most won't like it if you take it too far acidic. If you're planning on using that area long-term for veggies, your best bet is good helpings of humus and compost (including composted manure). =)
Getting the texture of the soil correct, as well as mulching, will do a lot more for proper water retention than adding peat moss ever will. =)
=)
Reply to
Eggs Zachtly
[....]
Eggs, if a customer asked you to apply lime and fertilizer to their lawn on the same day would you do it?
the fertilizer would be for Bermuda grass and something like 16-4-8 applied at 20 pounds/3000sq.ft.
Reply to
Jim
I wouldn't. I prefer to add lime in the fall, when it will have the couple months that it needs to break down and incorporate into the soil. That being said, I doubt it would do any harm. I wouldn't mix the two in the hopper at the same time. If I /had/ to do it, then I'd do the lime app, and then the fertilizer app.
Reply to
Eggs Zachtly
Eggs, thanks for your input on this.
The customer is trying to save money by eliminating some of my travel cost.
Reply to
Jim

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