Potting-up fussy seedlings

I've got a bunch of more adventurous seeds on the go, which will come to pricking out / potting on before long.
For now one lot have got away ahead of the pack - some seedlings of Crambe cordifolia.
Since potting-up its not going well. First true leaves are drying up, and have made no headway [after a couple of weeks], and a couple have snuffed it
My general question (i.e. not specifically related to Crambe cordifolia) is whether I would be better to try to improve drainage of multi purpose compost (go 1/3rd or even 50% Perlite perhaps?) with a view to stopping the compost becoming compacted, and to reduce the effect of watering [when the plants are not actually thirsty]?
Slight risk that they will need water more often, but by the time they get to the next potting-on pot-size they will probably be strong enough to be less influenced by compost-drainage.
Advice welcome, I want to avoid killing off the seedlings that I do manage to get to germinate
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coykiesaol


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coykiesaol;914944 Wrote:

Hi,
You can use ordinary sharp sand yes, but I would not recommend to use it alone.
As you are on clay I would mix 1 part topsoil/loam with 2 parts sand and a little bit of peat (about 1/2 a part if that makes sense).
The ideal time to do this is early autumn to encourage root growth over winter so I would wait until later in the season.
Also do you plan to aerate the lawn first? Definitely worth while if you have the patience, particularly as your lawn is on clay and doesn't drain well.
Hope this helps.
Alex
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SheffieldGarden

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Its really interesting to read this post, I want to see the latest designs which are very popular now a days as season..! But also your idea is good, You can use sharp sand..!
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Ava

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On Mar 26, 6:14 am, SheffieldGarden

Agree that the above is sound advice. And I would not do it without aeration first. Without aeration all the new mix is going to do is sit on top of the surface. With aeration, you create holes for at least some of it to fall into and get two inches into the soil. Also, the aeration by itself can help with the drainage.
While the mix is preferred, if cost or availability of good topsoil is an issue, you could do it with straight sand too.
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On Saturday, March 26, 2011 10:14:26 AM UTC, SheffieldGarden wrote:

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