Quickest growing trees to shield housing development

Hello I am new to this site and would really appreciate some help!
We live in a lovely conservation area and unfortunately a housing development is going up at the end of our garden over the end of the house. The house will be 2 storey with a pitched roof and one if going to be looking directly into our garden (about 80 metres long and 20 metres wide).
The developers cut down all of the beautiful tall trees which gave us totally privacy but now we feel completely exposed....
I know very little about trees but I would really appreciate anybody's advice as to which are the best ones to plant to hopefully shield all the new house which is going up as we speak and will be finished sometime this year.
I'm not sure whether I should be buying small or large trees but I am happy to pay more if it means I get the result I want quicker!!
Thanks so much
--
Lisa GB

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On Thu, 28 Jul 2011 07:29:43 +0000, Lisa GB

Would help to know your location/climate.
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On 7/28/11 12:29 AM, Lisa GB wrote:

Yes, this question requires knowing where you are and what your climate is.
In any case, the fastest trees generally also have problems. For example, eucalyptus are very fast; but many are also very messy. Poplars and their family are fast; they also tend to be shallow-rooted, having surface roots with suckers that can create a thicket.
Ash trees grow quickly. As with gingkos and asparagus, there are female and male ash trees. Female ash trees produce bucketsful of seed every year, leading to many, many seedlings all over your garden. Male ash trees produce pollen to which many people are allergic. Both have surface roots.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Thu, 28 Jul 2011 11:41:31 -0700, "David E. Ross"

Doesn't matter about what climate (a request for location had already been requested upthread), because none of those trees you mentioned make good privacy screens, in fact all being deciduous are trees only a know-nothing idiot would choose for privacy. And gingko is about the slowest growing tree there is. The OP can look for herself; this is a gingko that was planted as a five year old sapling more than 20 years ago, it's in full sun, in deep rich soil, receives sufficient water, and obviously is well fertilized:
http://i51.tinypic.com/14llx81.jpg
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"Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message wrote:

Eucalypts are NOT deciduous.
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wrote:

There are hundreds of types, some are. But it doesn't matter, before knowing where the OP resides suggesting any trees was silly, but especially eucalyptus.
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Except for those that are not. let us do a billy?
"Nearly all eucalypts are evergreen but some tropical species lose their leaves at the end of the dry season."
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus
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Except for those that are not. let us do a billy?
"Nearly all eucalypts are evergreen but some tropical species lose their leaves at the end of the dry season."
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus _______________________________________ Gee, you and Sheldon can both use google! Not that either of you would have ever seen one or known about those few tropical speices if you couldn't.
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Locust trees.
Greg
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Condolences on your situation. The assassins who cut down those good trees will probably die in their beds.
Judging from the feedback so far, tree-wise, would you consider a fast- growing hedge that, ISTR, could reach remarkable heights fairly quickly. What does the group think?
Also, does the code in your area permit a very high fence? If height is limited, can you fill in the top with wire and train vines into it?
HB
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I guess my reply is never going to show up, so here goes again:
What about thickly planting a fast-growing HEDGE rather than opting for trees (on which you have received some iffy replies).
Also: Could you build a wall as high as the code will allow, and continue it higher with chicken wire or other wire, through which you would train thick vines?
Just some thoughts.
HB
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Locust's tend to be self limiting. They planted many here after strip mining.
Greg
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