Identify nasty grub

I have no way to post a picture so I am sorry you will have to work from 1000 words as they say. I am in Australia where it is high summer, hot and showery at present.
A grub that I have never seen before just stripped a fig plant in a pot. All the leaves are reduced to paper thin lace, this took about 24 hrs for a 2ft (60cm) plant as it was fine beforehand.
The attackers are up to about 3/4in (18mm) long with segmented bodies and a pair of legs on each segment I think, my eyesight is not that good, lots of legs anyway. Each one has a similar number of segments, about 12. Some are smaller and presumeably given enough food they would all grow bigger.
They are yellowish on the underside and dark grey/brown on top and somewhat hairy. One end is blunt and seems to have black mouth parts, the other, the tail I think, is slightly pointed. Oh where is my binocular microscope ....
As they appeared so quickly I assume they hatched recently and have grown very fast. If you are able to identify the grub can you also tell me what the adult looks like so I can keep an eye open for them.
David
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If you have a local garden center, take the grub into one or more of them to see if they know what it is. I don't know if you have your version of the USA's notion of a County Agricultural Extension Agent, that are connected with universities, but if you do, they should be able to help you identify them.
Other than that, libraries usually have insect books and some have larva pictures along with the adult.
Good luck!
Janice
On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 23:27:19 GMT, "David Hare-Scott"

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work from

summer, hot and

in a pot.

24 hrs for a

bodies and a

good, lots of

12. Some are

bigger.
Sounds like some kind of a caterpillar, rather than a grub. Look for a spray or powder that contains Bacillus thuriengensis (BT). Or, pick them off and squish them.
Jim Lewis - snipped-for-privacy@nettally.com - Tallahassee, FL - Only where people have learned to appreciate and cherish the landscape and its living cover will they treat it with the care and respect it should have - Paul Bigelow Sears.
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On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 23:27:19 +0000, David Hare-Scott wrote:

In the US we have county extension agents affiliated with local universities. Check the insect depart at your local university. They will be happy to ID the critter.
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and
a
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are
somewhat
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....
Hi, David You could even take one of the bugs in a sealed container/jar to the local nursery or the CSIRO if you have one nearby. I'm sure one of those could help if they know their business. Cheers, Boozo in Adelaide, S.A.
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wrote:

Caterpillers. Use Dipel to kill them.
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