ID requested (insect)

Reposted from sci.bio.entomology.misc
Good day. I was hoping someone here could point me in the right direction. I've got 3 clients with the same beetle covering their fruit trees. This happened last year and it's starting again this year. Any offered help would be great.
http://ywgc.com/resources/photo/insects/mystery_beetle.jpg
http://ywgc.com/resources/photo/insects/mystery_beetle_1.jpg
As a side note, it seems that they help spread powedery mildew. Affected trees: apples, pears and a plum Location: Lummi island washington state usa
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Yard Works Gardening Co.
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Possibly Psyllobora vigintimaculata, aka mildew-eating ladybird beetle.
See http://www.cirrusimage.com/beetles_ladybird_Psyllobora.htm
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David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
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On Wed, 25 May 2005 18:59:08 +0000, David Bockman wrote:

Thank you very much Mr.Bockman, this is what we have. I have treated these trees with winter oil and sulphur three times this season. I'm not able to find much information on P. vigintimaculata in regards to if P. vigintimaculata is the vector of the mildew or not. P. vigintimaculata seems to be on non-infected leaves and then days later the leaves are full blown infected. This maybe due to P. vigintimaculata having spores on it's body and spreading it while hunting for new fungi patches.
Again, thanks for helping me out.
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I don't know the answer either, however it might be worth contacting your local agricultural extension office and finding out, as it would be a shame to interfere with a beneficial insect (should the beetle be actually helping rather than spreading).
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David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
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wrote:

He could also aim his questions towards sci.bio.entomology.misc
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this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
--MS_Mac_OE_3201417077_995894_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
nope. what he's talking about are ROSE CHAFERS
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/e123rosechafer . html
i totally disagree with all these unversity entomologists about controlling them one CHEMICAL spray or another. the method is use is squishing them between forefinger and thumb, dumping them into jars filled with soapy water, or using the direct spray on the hose controller. also, the "rose chafer attachment" placed upon japanese beetles traps may work IF your yard is large enough to place the traps far away from your plants {roses, grapes, linden-Tilia trees, willows, beech-Fagus trees, Filipendula, asparagus ferns, etc ...these are SOME of the plants and trees i've had defoliated by rose chafers before they were identified for me and my whole household turns out with jars of water and willing fingers to squish, drown and suffocate 'em} so...if you have any of the above plants AND MORE....and you have a smallish yard...DO NOT USE THE JAPANESE BEETLE traps with or without rose chafer attachments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

&gt; http://beyondgardening.com/Albums <BR> </BODY> </HTML>
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RAINDEAR wrote:

When you post in HTML format the links you post are not clickable.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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1. Rose Chafers look NOTHING like the beetle he posted. Not even close.
2. While I agree organic pest control is always preferable, in this case the gentleman posting is responsible for a large commercial orchard. There is no way hand picking could be an effective control.
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David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
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